CGarchitect News Feedhttp://www.cgarchitect.com/CGarchitect is the leading online community for architectural visualization professionals.Wed, 24 Jan 2018 04:15:18 MSTWomen in Arch Viz - Keely ColcleughJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2018/01/women-in-arch-viz---keely-colcleugh"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2018/01/143402.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p></p> <p></p> <p> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 81; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=20969&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=20969&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Women in Arch Viz (BOXX) --></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/FINALS_170901-2_Page_2.jpg" target="_blank"><strong><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/FINALS_170901-2_Page_2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></strong></a></p> <p>Suzhou competition for Kevin Daly Architects</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Tell us about your current role and what you are doing in the industry.</strong></p> <p>I am the <a href="http://kilograph.com/keely-colcleugh/" target="_blank">founder</a> and CEO of a creative studio called <a href="http://kilograph.com/" target="_blank">Kilograph</a> in LA. We are about 25 people creating communication design materials for the architecture, real estate development, and entertainment industries. Our products range from illustrations, animations and virtual reality experiences to branding, interactive design and signage design projects.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What was the path you took to get where you are today and was this always the role you thought you would have? What was your dream job as a kid and why?</strong></p> <p>I worked as an architect for a number of years, left to work in visual effects, and then found my way back to architecture via communication design and related fields. When I was a kid my dream job was to be an architect. My father wanted to be an architect at one point so I heard a lot about this profession growing up. That and I always loved to draw and build things.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What is the best and worst decision you've ever made?</strong></p> <p>Best decision - starting my own company. Worst decision - tie between dropping out of college with a full scholarship to pursue a job opportunity or starting my own company with an infant at home.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Based on our industry survey, women still only represent 7% of the industry.&nbsp; Do you have any thoughts on this, how it can be changed, and if it will be changed in the foreseeable future.</strong></p> <p>We need to move from an industry that focuses too heavily on process and software settings to one that is more creative. There are no shortage of female concept artists and architects. There is no reason this should be in the case in arch viz other a possible over-focus on tech. Design and art are not given the same priority in the broad discourse and education of arch viz artists as render settings. The further we push as an industry away from creative innovation to a numbers and style game, the fewer women, and talented artists in general, will be attracted to the profession.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/FINALS_170901-2_Page_4.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/FINALS_170901-2_Page_4-sm.jpg" width="630" height="347" /></a></p> <p>Suzhou competition for Kevin Daly Architects</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Name three other women, who are not working in this industry, that impacted your work artistically and/or the path you took to get where you are today. [include links if applicable]</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.pentagram.com/about/paula-scher" target="_blank">Paula Scher,</a> <a href="http://www.zaha-hadid.com/people/zaha-hadid/" target="_blank">Zaha Hadid</a>, <a href="http://www.insideoutside.nl/Petra-Blaisse" target="_blank">Petra Blaise</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/Paula_Scher_Atlantic_INT_9.jpg" width="630" height="450" /><br />Paula Scher<br /><br /></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/metropolis_ZH_1985.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/metropolis_ZH_1985-sm.jpg" width="630" height="274" /></a>Zaha Hadid</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/thepeak_ZH.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/thepeak_ZH-sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /><br /></a>Zaha Hadid</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/paulascher01.jpg" width="550" height="832" /><br />Paula Scher</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/PetraBlaise_chazum-museum-of-art-usa.jpg" width="544" height="479" /><br />Petra Blaise</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/PetraBlaise_InsideOutside_Collage_1000.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/PetraBlaise_InsideOutside_Collage_1000-sm.jpg" width="630" height="404" /></a>Petra Blaise</p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>What motivates/inspires you the most?</strong></p> <p>Challenges that require creative risk to uncertain outcomes. Basically every exciting job we've had.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What lessons have you learned in your career to date that you think would benefit others in the field?</strong></p> <p>Your voice is important and needs to be heard if you want to be a creative partner with your clients. Mean what you say at all times (don't ever say what you think a client wants to here). You may lose some business contracts but you'll keep the good ones.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/FINALS_170901-2_Page_5.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/FINALS_170901-2_Page_5-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p>Suzhou competition for Kevin Daly Architects</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What is the best piece of advice you ever received?</strong></p> <p>Empower leaders to rise within your organization (even if it feels like loss of control at first) they will lead you to longer term success.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What has been your proudest achievement in business to date?</strong></p> <p>Thriving as an office and growing to over 20 employees in 7 years. Getting the opportunity to work with groups impacting the future of cities: from public transit to autonomous vehicles,&nbsp; and seeing our work as a central piece in these discussions. On a more technical level - getting our first contract for a fully immersive 6DOF VR experience with a major clothing retailer. We gently pushed them from more traditional visualization requests to this medium as it seemed like the perfect solution to their problem. It paid off and we continuing to develop content for them.&nbsp; Seeing the entire client team completely engrossed in the virtual experience for the first time was fascinating. Design decisions were getting made and everyone had a "holy shit this is real" moment.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What other artistic pursuits or creative outlets do you pursue outside of your day to day work?&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>I am on the board of the Architecture and Design museum of Los Angeles and very involved with the museum's mission to engage and outreach to the community at large. Much of our time is devoted to supporting, fundraising, and helping with important initiatives related to the design community in LA and it is incredibly fulfilling. I am also working on a few side projects exploring the potential of VR for more personal architectural narratives.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/Inside-Outside_Seattle-Library_IBaan_6527_1000.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/Inside-Outside_Seattle-Library_IBaan_6527_1000-sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Where do you see the industry going?&nbsp; Does it look significantly different from where it is today? If so, how?</strong></p> <p>I think the industry is at a difficult point. The barrier to entry in arch viz is very low compared to other industries which creates a huge pool of vendors without standards of practice. Architects also have increasingly more capability to create resolved renderings in-house. We have seen this happening slowly over the years but with more intensity in the past two years where it is either ultra low-end or ultra high-end that is left for still renderings. The middle is gone unless there is an unrealistic deadline to accomplish or renderings come "packaged" with other deliverables.</p> <p>Film, creative VR, full marketing / branding packages will live on but only if archviz re-asserts itself as a creative partner solution instead of the "renderer".&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Please name five artists, creatives or business people (outside of the archviz industry) who have inspired you.</strong></p> <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Knoll" target="_blank">Florence Knoll</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wim_Wenders" target="_blank">Wim Wenders</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Mau" target="_blank">Bruce Mau</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patti_Smith" target="_blank">Patti Smith</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Bestor" target="_blank">Barbara Bestor</a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Please name five artists within the industry you think have influenced your own work or have influenced the industry?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.dbox.com/leadership/" target="_blank">Matthew Bannister</a>, <a href="https://www.mir.no/team/trond/" target="_blank">Trond Greve</a>, <a href="http://www.ericdebroche.com/contact/" target="_blank">Eric de Broches des Combes</a> , <a href="http://www.peterguthrie.net/" target="_blank">Peter Guthrie</a>.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>As a women do you feel you had to work harder or do anything differently than your male counterparts to get where you are today?</strong></p> <p>Not work harder, just be more serious on the job. It has been a very tough road starting your own company and raising a family but I don't know how different it would have been if I were a man, maybe the same?</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What advice would you give women thinking about entering into the arch viz industry?</strong></p> <p>Please do! We need more of you!</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What will be the biggest challenge for the generation of women behind you as it pertains to working in this industry?</strong></p> <p>I think the challenges are going away every day. The next generation is more computer literate, code literate, has rarely experienced any obstacles based on their sex. The obstacles I would see are the same that pertain to the next generation of men - decreasing value for still renderings, more competition from all around the world, a need to assert the relevance of "art" in the industry of arch viz. It is more difficult in the US with so little priorty given to art education, funding etc.. Here Europe will be at an advantage.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Where do you envision yourself 10 years from now? What are you doing and what did you do to get there?</strong></p> <p>Working on projects that promote innovative design communication at all scales (from signage design to app development and videos with a human connection), for all communities. Taking on work regardless of fee if it fits within our mission statement.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Please take one of your favorite projects and walk us through the piece from start to finish.&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/Kol_Emeth_02.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol2/Kol_Emeth_02-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p>Kol Emeth - Animation, Stills, 6DOF VR,&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://kilograph.com/work/kol-emeth/" target="_blank">Kol Emeth</a> was a project for a new Synagogue in Paolo Alto California. Initially we were contracted to develop a short animation for fundraising purposes. The design was so beautiful and there were so many moments of contemplation throughout the video. We used 3ds max and vray with after effects for minor post production/ color grading. DOF and volume lights were rendered in. Our approach was to highlight the sound effects that one might encounter in a sacred space as well as the sound effects in the natural environment. The synagogue's design was very indoor-outdoor and lent itself to this kind of vibe. We mixed these effects into the background track and cued to the animation. It was really effective.</p> <p></p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/235043491?color=ffffff&amp;title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="630" height="394" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/235043491">Kol Emeth VR</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/kilograph">Kilograph</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p>Once the video was created we proceeded to craft a series of still images (one of which won an ASAI award :, with different characters who might occupy this place as both a community center and a religious place. As our studio began to embark on high end VR projects we were really searching for the perfect immersion experience to show our clients the power of VR. Something that wasn't too personal (like a residence) but that had a sense of spatial intimacy. We decided to go back to Kol Emeth. Our process for scripting the VR film came from a conversation about clients dislike of&nbsp; teleporting and 'learning' in VR space. They weren't able to relax and enjoy. We also were really interested in trying non photorealistic modes of representation in VR so we opted for a black and white environment with exaggerated volume lighting. 360 sound in the central space added to the overall experience and enhanced what we were trying to do with sound cues in the original film. Once the experience was complete we transported viewers around the space over the span of a couple minutes and slowly transitioned back from black and white to photoreal progressing with time. The most incredible thing about this experience is the total sense of immersion people felt and their very real emotional response to only the architecture. Without fail someone always says to us "that changed my life" when the headset comes off.&nbsp; It is a pretty incredible feeling to facilitate that connection between human beings and spaces. We'd like to continue to explore the potential of this medium as well as more collaborative forms of VR.</p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Women in Arch Viz (BOXX) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 81; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=20969&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=20969&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Women in Arch Viz (BOXX) -->Tue, 16 Jan 2018 12:19:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2018/01/143402.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2018/01/women-in-arch-viz---keely-colcleughWomen in Arch Viz - Lucia FrascerraJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/12/women-in-arch-viz---lucia-frascerra"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/12/142866.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><br />Welcome to our first installment of our new&nbsp;Women in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the few months we will be featuring some of the talented women who work in visualization in hopes of inspiring artists from around the world and the next generation of women visualizers.&nbsp; If you know a women who should be featured, please email us at <a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com">jmottle@cgarchitect.com</a><br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<b><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Somewhereonlyweknow.jpg" target="_blank"><br /><br /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Somewhereonlyweknow-sm.jpg" width="630" height="424" /></a></b></p> <p><b><br /></b></p> <p><b>Tell us about your current role and what you are doing in the industry.</b></p> <p class="p1">I am working in London as a senior CGI designer for DBOX, an award-winning creative and communication agency specialized in branding, design, CGI, VR, photography and copywriting.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;<br /><br /></span></p> <p class="p1">Since I joined in 2015, I've been working together with the CGI team on a series of stills and VR for luxury real estates, residential, retail and office buildings for clients such as Foster + Partners, Eric Parry, Squire &amp; Partners, David Chipperfield and many more.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p><b>What was the path you took to get where you are today and was this always the role you thought you would have? What was your dream job as a kid and why?</b></p> <p class="p1">I always had a great passion for the Arts. My granddad was a sculptor and he first introduced me to drawing. Likely because of this, I was dreaming to become a painter from a young age.</p> <p class="p1">I certainly have never considered any jobs not related to Art. In fact I remember that I went from wanting to be a painter, a photographer, an interior designer, a graphic designer to my final decision to become an Architect.</p> <p class="p1">I decided to study Architecture at the University of Florence, which is fortunately not too far from my hometown Livorno in Tuscany. From the early days in my studies, I found the way architecture could be represented fascinating. I soon started to consider Architectural representation as a beautiful form of art.</p> <p class="p1">It didn't take long before I realized that the part of the process I liked the most was the representation part and towards the end of my studies I started to think that I had to make a choice: did I want to be an architect or a visualizer? At the beginning I thought that maybe I could have been both, but soon I realized that I didn&rsquo;t want to be 50% architect and 50% visualizer, I just wanted to be 100% of one of the two, and even if I loved designing, I realized that the thing that really was making me feel happy was spending all of my time rendering, so I decided for once and for all to leave architecture and become a visualizer.</p> <p class="p1">After this significant choice, I realized that I needed to improve my skills significantly to be competitive. Specifically, I had to learn much more about modelling and rendering, so I started a Master in computer graphics in a private Academy in Florence, where finally I got to know software like 3ds Max and V-Ray.</p> <p class="p1">On completion of my masters, I got a job offer from the same Academy in which I studied to become a post-production teacher and at the same time I started working on my personal portfolio. As soon as I finished an image I posted it online on forums, Facebook pages and websites like CGarchitect.com. Incredibly, one of the first images I posted, <i>Arctic</i>, gained the visualization pro of the week on CGarchitect and thanks to that DBOX found me and offered me a position in its studio in London. I never really thought about moving to another country but I could hardly refuse an offer like that! So I accepted the job and a few months later I left Italy to move to London, where I've been living and working ever since.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;<br /></span></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Anotherdayofsun.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Anotherdayofsun-sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p><b>What is the best and worst decision you've ever made?</b></p> <p class="p1">The best decision I have ever made is without any doubt accepting DBOX's job offer and moving to London. It was very challenging, especially at the beginning (I barely knew English when I moved) but I've been incredibly lucky to meet extraordinary people who made me feel at home from day one.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">The worst decision I made was deciding not to go to have an experience abroad when I was at University and had the chance to do it. I always thought It would have been cool to do it but I didn't do it out of cowardice. If I had done it, eventually moving to the UK or another country would have had been much easier - especially the language barrier.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p><b>Based on our industry survey, women still only represent 7% of the industry.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Do you have any thoughts on this, how it can be changed, and if it will be changed in the foreseeable future.</b></p> <p class="p1">I believe that unfortunately our profession is wrongly associated with something extremely technical, a job where you need to be a 3D guru, know all the most recent plug-ins and scripts on the market, have the most powerful machines, be a massive nerd and be able to do a bunch of very technical boring stuff. Sadly, this is socially considered more appealing to men, but less appealing to (some) women.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">Of course this common perception is almost certainly incorrect and plenty of women are both talented and enjoy this role. It&rsquo;s sad that more women don't necessarily want to participate in our industry today, and I am keen to help increase that tiny percentage.</p> <p class="p1">I'm not sure how we could fix the problem, it will take time to break this stereotype, but we are getting there. I think it's definitely a good start to show the presence of women already in the field, in order to attract more of them into our industry. I'm sure that this series of interviews CGarchitect is doing will be a precious source of inspiration for women out there who are thinking about pursuing this career and hopefully, it would be a step forward to make the number of women in Arch Viz grow.</p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Arctic.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Arctic-sm.jpg" width="630" height="867" /></a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>Name three other women, who are not working in this industry, that impacted your work artistically and/or the path you took to get where you are today.&nbsp;</b></p> <p class="p1">The first woman is Zaha Hadid, I&rsquo;m pretty sure everyone knows her, she was one of the very few women among the Starchitects. In an incredibly competitive male-dominated environment she was able not only to stand out but also to be one of the most important and influential personalities in the industry and I really wanted to be like her.</p> <p class="p2">The second woman is the Bass player Tal Wilkenfeld, one of the most famous bass players in the world. I used to play bass when I was younger, and she was such an inspiration to me partly because it&rsquo;s quite rare for girls play bass, and even more rare to find a very famous one! She is even younger than me and in an extremely male-dominated environment, she managed to find her way and become one of the best in her industry.</p> <p class="p2">I know I might sound a bit cheesy but I couldn&rsquo;t think of a woman who inspired me and encouraged me along my path more than my mum. She&rsquo;s an incredibly brave woman and she always supported all of my choices, standing by my side. I would not have got this far without her help and support, Thank you Ma!<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What motivates/inspires you the most?</b></p> <p class="p1">I love competing. There is nothing that would motivate me more than a challenge, that&rsquo;s why I often find myself running out of hours of sleep to do rendering competitions in my spare time.</p> <p class="p1">I&rsquo;m also very motivated/inspired by the work of the other artists, and in the past few years, I had the chance to meet in person some of the most talented people in the industry thanks to my work, events, and conferences. It makes me realize how lucky I am to be part of an industry where is so easy to get in touch with your peers and getting inspired by them every day.<br /><br /></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Holiday.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Holiday-sm.jpg" width="630" height="833" /></a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What lessons have you learned in your career to date that you think would benefit others in the field?</b></p> <p class="p1">I used to work very long hours, and I loved it! it was very tiring but also extremely rewarding. I was younger and I had the energy to do it for a long time, but at some point, I realized that I was leaving too many things behind and, even if I thought it was manageable at the time, in the long run, it was really hard to handle.</p> <p class="p1">That&rsquo;s when I realized that after all, work is yes a very important part of life, but just a part of it, as well as your friends, your family, your hobbies, etc... there needs to be a balance between all of these things. If you allow your work to take over everything else for a very long time, the reward that you get at the end might not be enough to balance what you gave up over the years.</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What is the best piece of advice you ever received?</b></p> <p class="p1">Do what you love, love what you do - that&rsquo;s all you need to know. This doesn&rsquo;t apply just in this industry obviously, but this was, and it is, more important to me than I can fully describe. We spend half or more of our time at work and you need to do something you love, otherwise, you are going to literally waste half your life!</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Homesweethome.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Homesweethome-sm.jpg" width="630" height="315" /></a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What has been your proudest achievement in business to date?</b></p> <p class="p1">Without any doubt, my proudest achievement by far was being chosen to be on the judging board for the CGarchitect 3D Awards for the years 2016 and 2017 together with some of the biggest names in the industry.</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What other artistic pursuits or creative outlets do you pursue outside of your day to day work?<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></b></p> <p class="p1">I love drawing and painting, even if unfortunately I haven&rsquo;t done much of it recently. When I am not working or spending time with my friends/family/boyfriend I spend quite a lot of my time doing my own CGIs for competitions or just for fun. This really relaxes me and helps me remember that I&rsquo;m able to create CGIs just with my resources and without external inputs from clients etc.</p> <p class="p1"><a href="http://www.luciafrascerra.com/" target="_blank">http://www.luciafrascerra.com/</a></p> <p class="p1"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/luciafrascerravisualization/" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/luciafrascerravisualization/</a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Morning.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Morning-sm.jpg" width="630" height="360" /></a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>Where do you see the industry going?<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Does it look significantly different from where it is today? If so, how?</b></p> <p class="p1">I think we can already smell the change within the industry, I believe that clients will always want stills, but VR/AR are becoming more and more popular and I&rsquo;m sure they will play a big role in the next few years. However, I feel we are still in the very early days, so I believe it&rsquo;s not going to be a day-to-night change.</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>Please name five artists, creatives or business people (outside of the archviz industry) who have inspired you.</b></p> <p class="p1">Many artists inspired me over the years, some of them are <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caspar_David_Friedrich" target="_blank">Caspar David Friederich</a>, for his evocative Romantic Landscapes, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wassily_Kandinsky" target="_blank">Vasilij Kandinskij</a> for his superb use of colour and for the unique relationship between Art and Music, architectural photographer <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Shulman" target="_blank">Julius Shulman</a> for his use of composition in photography, Architect <a href="http://www.johnpawson.com/" target="_blank">John Pawson</a> for the pure geometries and the importance of light in his buildings and <a href="https://snohetta.com/" target="_blank">Snohetta Architects</a> for the connection between architecture and nature.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Snowinthecity.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Snowinthecity-sm.jpg" width="630" height="867" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p><b>Please name five artists within the industry you think have influenced your own work or have influenced the industry?</b></p> <p class="p1">That's an easy one, the first artist I'm going to mention is Alex Hogrefe, because even if he doesn't know it, he taught me so much about post-production through his blog (<a href="http://visualizingarchitecture.com" target="_blank">visualizingarchitecture.com</a>) and he's probably the reason why I started to get so passionate about it.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">The second artist is one of my ex-teachers at the Master, Fabio Corica. Fabio is an incredibly talented guy who was one of the first people who helped me realize that my path was CGI and not Architecture. He taught me quite a lot of technical skills but most of all he influenced my workflow and the way I tell the story of an image.&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">How not to mention <a href="https://www.mir.no/" target="_blank">MIR</a>! I don't think anyone influenced my work more than them, especially in my early days. The first time I saw one of their images I was still a student and I couldn't believe that somebody would be able to do something like that!</p> <p class="p1">Another incredible artist I definitely need to mention is <a href="http://thirdseventh-book.com/" target="_blank">Alex Roman</a>, his film "The third and the seventh" is just poetry and I think it had a huge impact on the industry and on myself. Even many years after this piece of art was released, I still struggle to find other people/studios capable of what he did, and every time I see that film I almost cry!<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">Last but not least, <a href="http://www.dbox.com/" target="_blank">DBOX</a>. Can't describe how much this studio influenced me, my personal work and the whole industry. I've been very lucky to have the chance to work there and the amount of stuff I learnt over these years is just insane.</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>As a women do you feel you had to work harder or do anything differently than your male counterparts to get where you are today?</b></p> <p class="p1">I don't think I've ever been treated in a very different way, not in recent times anyway. I do recall that years ago, when I decided to pursue this career, some people were constantly underestimating me. They said that I would never make it in this industry, or that I wasn't good enough. I was not sure why they said that; maybe because they couldn't believe that a young woman could work in a quite technical and male-dominated environment, or maybe just to be mean. Who knows - i'm so glad I proved them wrong!</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Summeriscoming.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/Summeriscoming-sm.jpg" width="630" height="349" /></a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>Given all of the coverage we are seeing with the #metoo campaign, it begs the question if the architectural industry is any different.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Have you seen or experienced similar issues yourself or seen others within the industry experience the issues the media is bringing to light about workplace harassment and assault?</b></p> <p class="p1">I&rsquo;ve been very fortunate that this has never happened to me. All the people I met in my current and previous jobs have been absolutely professional and I never in any way felt threatened or found myself in an unpleasant situation with anybody. I really hope that&rsquo;s the sign that our industry is &ldquo;clean&rdquo; and not just me being lucky.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What advice would you give women thinking about entering into the arch viz industry?</b></p> <p class="p1">The best advice I could give is to believe in yourself and don't let anyone tell you what you can or can't do. People will say "you're not good enough" or "you're never gonna make it", listen to them, but just to prove them wrong later on.</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/TheBank.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/TheBank-sm.jpg" width="630" height="863" /></a></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>What will be the biggest challenge for the generation of women behind you as it pertains to working in this industry?</b></p> <p class="p1">I think the biggest challenge will be getting more women in the industry in the first place, and once we get them, the challenges they'll be facing will be the same as the men - which will be trying to keep up with the industry changing, new technologies, new ways to represent architecture, understanding the new needs of the clients, and so on.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p><b>Anecdotally, I have noticed that on average the women artists within the arch viz industry tend to be some of the most talented people in our field.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Would you agree? If so, why do you think that is? <span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></b></p> <p class="p1">This is a really interesting and complicated problem - one I certainly don&rsquo;t have all the answers for. My personal feeling is that this isn&rsquo;t unique to our industry: it&rsquo;s similar in other industries where the percentage of girls is very low. I've been talking about this very same problem many times with my boyfriend who works in technology and also in his industry the problem is very present.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">I think that that at least part of the problem is that girls are normally taught to be "perfect" and the social pressure on them is often quite significant (often more than for guys). It is tragically common that girls often simply exclude themselves from the "competition"<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>if they are not sure 100% they will succeed. On the other hand, a guy will frequently be far more likely to try to enter the competition even if is just 60% sure that he'll succeed (or even less), because generally, he's more keen to take risks and under less pressure to not fail. The result is that the few girls that actually enter the competition are the bravest and very self-confident and for this reason they turn out to be very good at what they do.</p> <p class="p3"></p> <p><b>Where do you envision yourself 10 years from now? What are you doing and what did you do to get there?</b></p> <p class="p1">That&rsquo;s a million dollar question! Unfortunately, I&rsquo;m not sure I can answer this one, 10 years is a long time! I&rsquo;m pretty sure I will be in London, and I&rsquo;m pretty sure I&rsquo;ll still be doing CGI!<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p><b>Please take one of your favourite projects and walk us through the piece from start to finish.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></b></p> <p class="p1">I'm gonna talk about one of my favourite personal works: <i>Tea Time</i></p> <p class="p1">This image is done in 3dS max + Corona + Photoshop. I made it<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>for the Evermotion Challenge in 2015, and it gained the first award.</p> <p class="p2">I&rsquo;m pretty fond to this image as was the first one I made after I started working for DBOX and even if the approach to this CGI didn&rsquo;t change that much from the previous ones in my portfolio, my experience at DBOX was essential for it, especially given the photography and the level of detail.</p> <p class="p1">The theme of the Evermotion Challenge 2015 was the LOFT. The first thing I always think about before starting a new image is finding some good references, which can be found in everything: photography, other CGIs, paintings, illustrations etc. I think a good reference is the one that can communicate a very similar emotion you want your image to communicate.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>I usually search for different types of references: some for the composition, some for the lighting, some for the general atmosphere and some for the colour palette. In this way, i&rsquo;m pretty sure that my image is gonna be exactly how I want it to be at the end.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">Since the beginning I wanted this image to be an art studio, so I tried to find as many references as possible to better understand what art studios look like and how the lighting and atmosphere inside them look.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/_reference_TeaTime.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/_reference_TeaTime-sm.jpg" width="630" height="306" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Once I have all the references I need, the next step is particularly important to me: sketching. I think that before playing around with 3D, camera views, modelling etc, it&rsquo;s absolutely necessary to have a very precise idea of what you are about to do, and of the story you want to tell. That&rsquo;s why I normally do some sketches of my idea until I find the good feeling of the composition, balance, image crop, etc. What I always repeat to myself is that if something works in a sketch, it must work in the final render as well! <span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Sketching helps me put together all the information I collected from the references, and it gives me the chance to &ldquo;see the image even before it&rsquo;s done&rdquo; which means I don&rsquo;t have to go straight into the 3D software and waste my time finding the right camera view, the right image ratio, and the right composition - because I&rsquo;ve already done all of that in the sketch phase. This is why I normally use the sketch as a guide for the 3D and compositing.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/_Workflow_Teatime.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/_Workflow_Teatime-sm.jpg" width="630" height="231" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">With <i>Tea Time</i> I wanted to show a very specific moment: when the artist has a little break to clear her mind, drinking a cup of tea, thinking about her unfinished painting and what to do to finally complete it. I also wanted to create some kind of mystery on the scene not showing the painting, making who watch the image wandering how it would be like.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/TeaTime.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/WomenInArchViz/Vol1/TeaTime-sm.jpg" width="630" height="952" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">When it comes to the 3D phase, I think it&rsquo;s essential to know in advance what you can do in 3D and what in post, according to your skills, to the time you have, and how powerful your machine is. For me, I know that i&rsquo;m not the fastest person in doing 3D modelling, and my machine at home is not the most powerful in the world. This means i&rsquo;d rather add some photography elements in post instead of modelling and rendering them, just like I did in <i>Tea Time</i>, where a lot of the elements I used are photography.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">For me, the machine is just a tool, along with the various pieces of software, and as long as you know your skills you&rsquo;ll be able to use your resources to your own advantage.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Postproduction <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2BviceFQtk" target="_blank">breakdown video youtube link</a></p>Thu, 21 Dec 2017 19:12:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/12/142866.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/12/women-in-arch-viz---lucia-frascerraBusiness in Arch Viz. Vol. 10 - Finding Your LookJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/12/business-in-arch-viz-vol-10---finding-your-look"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/12/142688.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://corona-renderer.com/download" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/CoronaRenderer-BusinessInArchViz-Header-top-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Mix1-1500wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Mix1-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a>&nbsp;</p> <h1><strong><br />Finding your look&nbsp;</strong>by Juraj Talcik</h1> <p></p> <h2><strong>An approach for conscious image creation and better use of tools in managing your personal creative vision&nbsp;</strong></h2> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Ask the right questions</strong></p> <p><em>"So goes a proverb: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and he will never ask "What HDRi/LUT did you use?" ever again.</em></p> <p>If there is one particular thing that visualizers have in common with photographers, it's that a lot of them are inadvertently asking the wrong questions, and that often leads to frustration on both sides. That is not just a trait of hobbyists or beginners, I am guilty of that myself after all these years! But I've learned to banish those thoughts, to better analyze what I am really interested in replicating, and then rely on my own skillset to realize it. This approach is something I would like to guide you through so that you can work with confidence yourself.</p> <p>Why are there "wrong" questions? Because learning the answer to them won&iacute;t leave you in a more knowledgeable state in the true sense of the word. They're akin to asking "What camera did you use?" in day when even entry-level DSLR with a kit lens can make fantastic images. Heck, an iPhone photo can land you on the cover of glossy magazine or win you a photographic award!</p> <p>Learning the name of the exact part of process or of a particular prop or tool will bring you as close to replicating the great image you admire as would buying the same chair and keyboard the artist used while sitting behind his workstation. The props or tools will merely show a potential, potential that the artists fulfilled themselves with their creative choices backed with experience.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>The are no secrets to successful image</strong></p> <p>These questions will only set you up for failure and frustration. There is no elusive secret technique or hidden button to push (I've looked for them myself for way too long). Great creatives are almost never defined by such externalities as their choice of software, a particular technique such as HDRi, or which exact one or two buttons they push during post-production.</p> <p>I am by no mean saying those aren't important. Great software that fits your preference, or high-quality HDRI domes that do their job correctly, are important parts of the creative workflow and their mastery can be crucial in executing your creative vision. You can't take a picture without having some sort of camera after all, but it's important to sort out the priorities and place the tools and techniques where they fit better - which is behind a conscious creative vision.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>The role of the software</strong></p> <p>The tools of the trade for the architectural visualizer have greatly evolved to a point where they are as unobtrusive as possible. Long gone are the days of tweaking loads of technical values and searching for the right formula that will save you from the morning horror of seeing splotches all over your image. All tools can make great images now, so you can't make a wrong choice. Consequently, none of the tools will produce great images for you all by themselves. This is a fantastic state of affairs because we want to focus squarely on the creative part, without enduring any unnecessary burden from the technical part.</p> <p>I personally use Corona Renderer for the ease of use, which comes both as great integration into the host application like 3ds Max, and as great simplicity in producing clean, technically-correct images. It's the closest to the one-button dream solution, and capable whether you are a beginner or seasoned professional.&nbsp;</p> <p>The same applies to post-production software, whether you use it to paint the majority of your picture or just put some finishing tweaks to color and tones.&nbsp;</p> <p>With all that said, I would love to show you how I try to find my vision for projects and how I use my tools to craft the images afterwards to fulfill that vision.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Settings-944wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Settings-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="457" /></a></p> <p>The rest is not important for the look of your image! It's great that we have the freedom to not think about it anymore.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Lost in the Workflow</strong></p> <p>There are many established common workflows when it comes to architectural visualization, and some of them harken back too much to the technical nature of it. The biggest offender in my book is to overly focus on breaking things up into particular building blocks, i.e: "Lighting"/"Texturing"/"Post-Production"/etc.</p> <p>When you divide your work into blocks like this in the very beginning, the image process becomes a technical puzzle, where you can easily get the feeling that you might be missing a crucial block in order to solve the puzzle. It may also lead you to give preference to a particular block to the detriment of the final image. A fantastic texturing job will never be able to save poorly lit and composed image that doesn&iacute;t elicit any emotion.</p> <p>It may also lead you into a needlessly strict linear path when being more flexible would yield a better result. Stacking layers on top of each other relegates the workflow to that of a painter - except the kind who is renovating their kitchen rather than one who is creating a work of art. I would like to propose an alternative that puts a slight twist on this.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Enter (Pre)visualization</strong></p> <p>The great photography pioneer Ansel Adams defined "visualization" as <em>"the ability to anticipate a finished image before making the exposure".</em></p> <p>The complexity of early-age photography made visualizing your subject a crucial necessity. Knowing what composition and light you were going to capture was an important aspect of it, and while there is nothing wrong with simply capturing reality as it is with an unpremeditated push of a button, this concept of visualization is much closer to the work we do in CGI, and learning to harness its power can be very beneficial.</p> <p>Cinematography took this purely psychological concept further, into the practical realm of prototyping, called "previs", experimenting with art direction such as lighting, composition, camera and placement in a looser more approximated set, before incurring the cost of full production.&nbsp; I like to utilize both of these concepts heavily in our work in architectural CGI. Here is how I apply it in our studio:</p> <p></p> <p><strong>The harder the start, the easier the finish</strong></p> <p>I am not ashamed to say that we brainstorm and play around with the scene in our studio as much as we end up spending time polishing the result to its final quality. This has proved to be a successful formula for us to keep the creative spirit and motivation high while delivering unique and good-looking images that both us and our clients are proud of.</p> <p>If you want to cry that this is a luxury you can't afford, I would love to clarify that this isn't about wasting time daydreaming before starting the tools, but more about equalizing the priorities during the full length of production. The creative gains during conceptualization and experimentation will smoothen and shorten the following production and may save you from spiraling production costs that can result from excessive back-n-forth with an unhappy client later in the process.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>[Previsualization] -&gt; [Scene mockup] -&gt; [Applying the concept] -&gt; [ Polishing up the successful concept]</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Start with an Idea</strong></p> <p>Conceptualization isn't a set amount of stages or particular techniques. The process is individual for every artist and unique to every project&iacute;s needs. The main purpose is to think of the image. In our studio, Veronika and I consider what we want to achieve with the image first. Asking questions like: What are the strong elements of the project or the particular space to be portrayed? What sort of emotion should the image convey? What color palette and light would achieve that?</p> <p>Lot of artists want the images to tell a story. I am not necessarily of the opinion that every image needs to strongly tell a story, and I feel this often leads to a forced narrative overtaking the image and overshadowing other qualities. But I do consider how each of the individual elements of the image contribute in meaningful ways. A hazy sunny morning light over a neatly unkempt bed can add a touch of life and a storytelling element to an otherwise sterile room. I imagine soft bright light washing over the room and a tamed palette of warm tones, and I get a mental image in my head of how I want to proceed with the image creation.</p> <p>When building the vision for the image, I draw upon inspiration from a multitude of sources. There's a mental library of images in my head from personal experiences travelling and exploring, or a visual library of work from a multitude of media such as photography or cinematography, and so on. When drawing inspiration from the work of others, try not to just emulate them. Analyze and go deeper into why you love that particular inspiration.</p> <p>Try to describe your vision. A bold composition, natural light, a focus on the XYZ element. It will remind you of the priorities during production and help you better communicate your ideas and your plan to your client.</p> <p>Whether you merely keep this in your mind, or write it down, or create visual moodboards, all depends on you and the particular project. A strong moodboard can be a powerful weapon in winning over your client&iacute;s trust, granting you the much necessary creative freedom in executing your vision.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-References-1500wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-References-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="382" /></a></p> <p>It's great to look for references elsewhere. Just aim broadly and look outside the field - photography, movies, paintings, etc. Perhaps subjects outside of architecture can give you ideas for your work (moody landscapes, colorful portraits...)</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Moodboard2-1500wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Moodboard2-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="118" /></a></p> <p>A small moodboard from a presentation to a client. If our ideas for mood, light, material and color palette, furniture and details fit together at this stage, making it fit together in a CGI scene will simply be a matter of craftsmanship!</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>A more agile approach</strong></p> <p>Armed with a vision, the next step is to quickly test it. It may live up to or even surpass its imagined potential - or it may fall like house of cards! It's therefore important not to focus on the details of the work yet.</p> <p>To quickly build up a playground, we use premade content from our in-house asset library when possible, and creating a simple approximation when not. I don&iacute;t believe in testing in isolation. A "Clay" stage, which is the "naked" model of a scene with a white/grey material, is used at best for early composition or architecture sign-off, but not to test lighting, due to its very inaccurate portrayal of light; dark painted walls, overly rich colored props or reflective flooring can drastically alter the interaction of the light in the scene, and a clay render will not capture any of that.</p> <p>With the help of physically correct shaders, this situation can be easily amended. Without wasting time on complex shaders and gathering high-resolution texture sources (which at this point wouldn&iacute;t contribute much), I use a simple color or diffuse texture and approximate the specular reflection (just "matte"/"semi"/ or "polished"), giving me a preview close to how the final scene will look. Those are two clicks that can make all the difference.</p> <p>The faster I build the set, the sooner I can walk through it as virtual photographer!</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Clay-vs-Materials-1358wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Clay-vs-Materials-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="421" /></a></p> <p>Both the clay and final image above use the same light setup. I created the light with the materials in place, since the one on the left isn't very useful in judging how the result will look. Don't fall in love with an unfinished result!</p> <p></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Take the opportunity to explore deeply</strong></p> <p>One of the reasons so many creatives search for a holy-grail of a particular way of doing things (like some special HDRI) is that they don&iacute;t explore fully the tools at their disposal or learn deep enough to understand them.</p> <p>Light is one of the most fantastic aspects of an image. To abandon the opportunity to shape it to your liking and instead follow the preference of some template is robbing yourself of the most satisfying part of this work, in my opinion.</p> <p>Don't think of "Light" as a building block in your puzzle. I don't associate it with a particular technique such as Sun/Sky system, HDRI dome, IES spotlight - instead I think of light as a transformational force that reveals the built form, the shape of elements, the texture of every surface; of its influence over the mood and spirit of the space. It is a creative medium to be mastered and used to mold our vision into our final image.</p> <p>I am a great fan of natural light. Daylight can take so many forms and interact with architecture in so many ways. It can be diffused or directed; reveal patterns or shapes; put focus onto the space or onto the light itself alone. As CGI artists, we have power to sculpt it in way a photographer can&iacute;t imagine, invoking sunrise or blue hour at will, amplifying a golden ambiance with atmospheric effects like fog to separate our subject and underline the magical mood.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-light-matrix-1500wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-light-matrix-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="404" /></a></p> <p>For architects, the light is at the very centre of their designs. They look at how to shape it by form and texture, and in return, the mood and spirit of the space. As a CGI visualizer, it's good to give it the same depth and importance! It requires thought and consideration, not a cookie-cutter approach. Image credit: SIOBHAN ROCKCASTLE &amp; MARILYNE ANDERSEN</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Use simple means to achieve spectacular results</strong></p> <p><em><strong>"The best camera is the one you have with you"</strong></em></p> <p></p> <p>Once I know what I want to achieve, executing it is a simple matter of craftsmanship. Intimate knowledge of tools and thinking outside of the box can help, though. To the surprise of many, 80 percent of our work is lit using the age old Sun &amp; Sky system. It gives you a breadth of options you might not be aware of!</p> <p>You can affect the size of the sun to make softer shadows, make the sun much weaker to put more dominance into the diffused light, desaturate the sky to simulate an overcast Nordic sky, or desaturate the sun to simulate it being diffused behind clouds. From a warm Mediterranean afternoon, to an intense Alpinic sun with strong sharp shadows, or a bright neutral white light in Scandinavia, it&iacute;s all within reach with few clicks and tweaks of the system.</p> <p>A few of our images from a recent award-winning project used nothing more than a simple white-colored plane, positioned with adjusted intensity and directionality.</p> <p>Do you prefer HDRI domes? Perhaps there is this sky with an incredible sun behind clouds, but it's midday in Summer and you would like the same light just lower? Simply open the texture in Photoshop, apply warp or repaint the position through other means and you have the same nice light with longer shadows. Or perhaps you just want to keep the clouds and affect both the height and intensity of the sun? Then separate them into two textures that are combined back together in a flexible manner inside your 3D app, or combine the systems (a sun from the 3D app, and a sky with the separated HDRI texture).</p> <p>The options are endless. Don't let the tools command your work, direct them to your goals.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-HDRI-1237wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-HDRI-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="669" /></a></p> <p>You can freely modify HDRI maps to suit your needs. Here I quickly (and dirtily!) warped the hotspot to make longer shadows. I also painted below the horizon to bounce some light and color from the "ground". Don't LOOK for the best one - MAKE your best one!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Find your signature style</strong></p> <p>Through time and practice, following your own vision and relying on your skills will reveal the most satisfying "by-product" - the emergence of a signature style, a look to your work that is unique to you. Your images will be consistent with the goals you set in advance, creating a cohesive body of work, a memorable portfolio attractive to clients.</p> <p>Your work will feel unique, while everyone else will be focused on using the "same settings" as one famous image or another.</p> <p></p> <p>Best,</p> <p>Juraj Talcik</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Kitchen-1500wide.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol10/TalcikDemovicova-Kitchen-630wide.jpg" width="630" height="431" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Links</strong></p> <p>Talcik&amp;Demovicova: <a href="http://talcikdemovicova.com/" target="_blank">http://talcikdemovicova.com/</a></p> <p>Corona Renderer: <a href="https://corona-renderer.com/" target="_blank">https://corona-renderer.com/</a></p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (Corona) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 79; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=90712&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=90712&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (Corona) -->Thu, 14 Dec 2017 12:49:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/12/142688.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/12/business-in-arch-viz-vol-10---finding-your-lookBusiness in Arch Viz. Vol. 9 - IT Infrastructure &amp; Networking (Part 2 of 2)Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/12/business-in-arch-viz-vol-9---it-infrastructure--networking-part-2-of-2"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/12/142552.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p class="p1"><b><br /></b></p> <p class="p1"><b><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-MIR1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-MIR1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></b>Image Courtesy: MIR</p> <p class="p1"><b><br /></b></p> <p class="p1"><b>What does your data backup system and strategy look like?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>We use the rule of three: one original protected with drive redundancy and hot spare disks, one copy on site to local storage, one copy out of the office.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>Always having your main copy and several satellite copies done automatically week by week. We are really paranoid about losing data so we even make more local copies of several projects that are actually running. The strategy is to have lots of copies so you never regret anything.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>Our backup system uses best practices of daily, weekly and monthly sets. It also includes machine replication. We use disk backup and off site mirroring (no more tape drives).<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>We run a 4 bay RDX tape drive, we backup live projects, resources and admin nightly. These tapes are rotated weekly so there is always a set offsite. There is also a backup server (also a domain controller). In the case of the main server having a critical failure, the live projects would be copied from the tapes to the backup server. This would be enough to get by while the main server is rebuilt.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">This of course relies on the live projects and the tapes being administered effectively.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>We keep one on site back of our active projects, and one off site back up. Our archived projects are kept on site and we are currently in the process of integrating Amazon Glacier for deep storage backup of our archives.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR:</b> This is a huge and kind of problematic issue. We create more data than what it makes sense to back up, and have not yet found a good solution to this problem. We are working on new solutions to this now, that will be more an integrated part of our workflow.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> The isilon has built in snapshotting, and we can lose up to 3 hard drives or 2 nodes and still keep running. Beyond that we have disaster backups that go to LTO tape library, which get cycled out and taken offsite.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>The Digit Group: </b>We have recently shifted from a hardware (tapes/CD/DVD) to an online (Cloud) strategy, using multiple providers to solve our real-time/once an hour/once a day/once a week/once a month and data banking needs.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> We can't afford to have a day without our files, so we run a highly redundant system. Essentially, we have a second file server that fully replicates our primary file server throughout the day. They have automatic failover, should one of them decide to die. This also forms our primary onsite backup. We also regularly replicate the servers off site via this system using Synology Snapshot Replication.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> We have used a lot of methods - online backup, tapes, hard drives we throw in boxes, offloading to a smaller RAID array.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> Size and safety. We have now 3 mirrored servers. 2 in-house and 1 external.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> The backup system should be exactly the same as the main storage. But the main problem is, it is too expensive if you also want to build the same system. The most annoying part is, the copying process is really painful and it takes a lot of time. &nbsp;It will also make your network traffic is very high when the backup processes on business days, making the network disconnect and will slow down the production flow almost 100 percent. <br /> You might say, you can set the backup system overnight or on weekend, but the problem is, our output is quite big, almost every day our artists render overnight and some of them use the render farm as well. If we always render on business days, it going to make things more complicated. So, we finally choose to do it in a manual way. For all the project data, we archived it through 3dsmax, and we will save it with all the psd and final images, and copy it manually to our backup system.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> UPS, Local redundancy, supplemental storage for old projects and permanent offsite storage.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>The primary server manages shadow copies for one week's worth of data that allows users to restore previous versions without any other assistance from IT. Incremental tape backups are run constantly to tape with a full backup run periodically and kept offsite.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> We are using the most stable enterprise HDDs in our NAS solution, which giving us a little more room of stability. As well everything is built in RAID there high chance to recover the data. We are backing up old projects to make sure when client will come back to us we will have all assets to continue to work on this project. We do not have mirror of whole server, because it very expensive. Cloud services are also not working for us for now, with 100tb of cloud space it will cost an insane amount of money and you will be leashed to it. Stop payment &nbsp;and lose what you had. We tried it, and realized that if you need files quickly, there no way to download even 3tb project in an hours. As I mentioned before we are not there yet.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> A third server manages it&hellip; instead of backing everything up, twice a day our system chooses only 3d files and no frames are stored because it's the easy material to be rendered again if something fails and all the 3d material done by our artist should be a great loss.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-PixelFlakes1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-PixelFlakes1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a><span style="color: #000000;">Image Courtesy: PixelFlakes</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Any specific advice for larger studios or smaller studios about building or growing a proper IT infrastructure?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>Ask for advice, the more we all share our experience, the better for everybody. You'll be surprised how people share this information.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: &nbsp;</b>Don't get mad at it, be reasonable, build your structure by little steps and take decisions that bring possible scalability. The key point is never being overwhelmed by the technical part of business.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>For smaller studios, keep it simple and absolutely do not neglect backup when planning. Take advantage of cloud storage (Google offers unlimited storage for business accounts) to replicate critical systems and data off site. Backup is a big expense but it&rsquo;s absolutely necessary.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>My advice for building or growing a proper IT infrastructure is invest heavily in the firm&rsquo;s server components (network cards, hard drives, RAID cards, and switches to name a few), never buy computers with components that are more the a few years old because in the long run, technology will pass you by and those computers will not be able to be upgraded to keep up with the times and you will have to buy a new computer in the end, and lastly, develop a flowchart of every component, license, software, and plugin because that flowchart will be what saves you from chasing that one thing that may be wreaking havoc on that visualization pipeline.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> If you are able get a dedicated IT manager who will have the best interests of the company in mind (not just be a barrier to getting things done), track the problems, so that you can identify the recurring ones. For small studios, try to maintain discipline among users workstations, discourage users from &ldquo;going off the ranch&rdquo; and installing random software and putting the company in jeopardy from a licensing standpoint or network weaknesses.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> Plan. Upgrading when it&rsquo;s too late or sorting backups once you&rsquo;ve lost important data is of course not an option.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> Get high quality machines, and try building them from the ground up. Buy some used parts if it means you will get a more powerful system up.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> My advice would be... everyone need to know about the 3dsmax and the render engine. Mostly on file project size management. Test the scene with or without converting the object to proxy, need to test the file size, vs render speed, vs network traffic. Although it seems like very simple advice, it took us years to figure out. Lots of test we have been done before we finally come up with our current network setup.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> A reliable system is better than a fancy full feature consumer grade one.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>Supporting your company internally is a great way to keep a cost efficient handle on IT services. But knowing when support requires outside assistance is key. When you balance your own time and the concern over making a decision that could cost the company time and money it becomes obvious when outside support is necessary.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House: </b>Invest in your tools, it will gives you more smooth result, every dollar will pays of for sure. Separate things from long term and short term investment, build better workstations. Most R&amp;N is going locally while farm is busy, think ahead, of upgrade possibilities. Build or upgrade your network to maximum on today's technologies. Time is getting more expensive every day, there no reason to spend it on fixing or waiting.</p> <p class="p1"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations: </b>Avoid getting the ultimate hardware or software, it's always expensive and overestimated, get 75% of the power saving money and use the easy thing. The thing with great, impressive features can lock you for years and really often you are only using the same features as the easy and cheap ones.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-publicsquare1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-publicsquare1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="415" /></a><span style="color: #000000;">Image Courtesy: Public Square</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Are there any specific tools that you use on a daily basis that help you manage the network and its administration?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>Yes, our IT staff monitor software installations, inventory, remote accesses, etc.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>Sure, the NAS&acute;s built in tools for backup are really good since you don't have to be an illuminati to understand and use.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Remote Desktop Connection manager v2.7</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph:</b> Spiceworks mostly as it is a one stop shop for all IT administration.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR:</b> We use Windows remote desktop, and also a software that we are beta-testing (which is secret).</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape: </b>One primary useful tool is our monitoring system , it is essential to understanding any failures among the equipment in the data center, along with that the support system where users can submit trouble tickets.<span class="Apple-tab-span"> </span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> Almost all our management tools are cloud based. Our network is run off Ubiquiti Unifi hardware, that has a fully cloud managed dashboard. They are in our opinion the best on the market now, and it makes a huge difference to the ease of administration.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square: </b>Mostly just backburner. And remote desktop to keep an eye on things.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> Yes, we created our own tools to see which machines are free to render and made it very simple to use always the biggest power available</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha: </b>Remote connection and SSH clients mostly, alongside specialized OS for the taks.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue:</b> Sonicwall VPN for remote access. Also exploring Silent Install Builder and Deadline for renderfarm management.</p> <p class="p1"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House: </b>As we are using 3ds Max in our pipeline, we can the included package tools. For years it&rsquo;s been pretty stable, and in most cases has not required extra tools for network rendering. There some useful small utilities to monitor health and load of the farm, but we using it only on couple of machines. We have a chat specifically for the farm to always be on the same page with team. For now it feels enough but maybe in a future we will need something more that that.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> common windows tools&hellip; nothing fancy.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-2gs1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-2gs1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="840" /></a><span style="color: #000000;">Image Courtesy: 2G Studio</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>What are some hard lessons you&rsquo;ve learned the hard way setting up a visualization network?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>Don't trust the big guys: Dell, HP, they will sell you and over budgeted servers that can handle our workload. Try to look for advice in the industry.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>That most of the times what seems cheap in first place can be expensive later on.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>We implemented virtualization a number of years ago on the recommendation of an IT company we were working with. Virtualization sounds like a great thing (it was THE thing for a while), but in practice we were badly burned. When it&rsquo;s working, it&rsquo;s great; it maximizes resources and handles hardware failures automatically. When something goes wrong, it requires some serious knowledge to fix. We didn&rsquo;t have that knowledge and relied on an outside company to help, so when something happened (and it did!) we were not able to respond quickly. We are implementing a plan soon to remove the last of our virtualized systems.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>There is no cheap and easy route.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>Network efficiency and stability make or break a firm. A full day of down time is thousands of dollars, and over the years I have learned that keeping the network as stable as possible will save you from sleepless nights of troubleshooting<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> There are many times when we tried to be penny wise, but ended up being pound foolish, the Isilon, the Cisco switches, are both enterprise level hardware that perform on a much higher plane than the consumer level version of those devices.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> Even with the best planning, sometimes things don't work out. You might have thought a particular piece of hardware would resolve an issue to no avail. For example, initially we thought moving to a RAID 6 system alone would work. We tried it and it was just too slow for us, leaving us with a very expensive but slow storage system. This required some on the spot brainstorming which resulted in the trial of SSD caching, which worked! Another issue is physical space; we don't have a dedicated server room... yet. This means our racks must stand within the main, open plan office which of course could lead to noise and heat issues. To solve this, we started using APC Netshelter CX cabinets. They are insulated/sound proofed and work beautifully.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> REDUNDANCY! You don&rsquo;t want to lose your data.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> To realize that when the server doesn't work, all are screwed. It&rsquo;s clear for sure, but luckily we had this just once for half a day and it was a nightmare to experience how dependent we are on this.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> Redundancy, and backup. This are the worst, also down time.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>Never underestimate the amount of data that artists can quickly generate. When building out a data infrastructure double the size of storage you think you'll need</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> Couple of things, memory and internal storage very important for the node machine, it has to be minimum match your workstations, if not you will have situations when the farm will not be able to handle your project, second is power consumptions, make sure the place where your farm is placed has enough power to work at maximum fulfill. And one more thing, maybe very obvious, update your software in between the projects, maybe this for more younger studios. <b>&nbsp;</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> Getting the latest one thing&hellip; such as hardware and software makes your work harder rather than easier&hellip; wait 3 months after every release.</p> <p class="p3"><b><span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></b></p> <p class="p3"><b><span class="Apple-converted-space"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-DesignStor1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-DesignStor1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="900" /><br /></a></span></b>Image Courtesy: DesignStor</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>How do you manage network rendering? Do you use 3rd party tools to manage that process or have you developed your own tools?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>No, we just use Autodesk's backburner or the distributed rendering from Vray.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>3rd party tools for the moment.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>We use a highly customized version of Deadline as well as many scripts and programs developed in house.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Deadline</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph:</b> We use Thinkbox software for our network rendering manager. Great tool and helps with IT oversight because it allows me to see all the specs per render machine as well as up time and in some cases downtime.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR:</b> We are helping out with beta testing some tools. In general we don't use network rendering that much. We mainly work on images, and haven't had any problems with rendering times the latest years.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> We use deadline, which has been another hard lesson, after years and years of fighting with Backburner, Deadline just works, it is very powerful and can be used across platforms and with many software, which is a huge benefit.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes: </b>We use backburner for animations / interactive work, however our primary usage for them is distributed bucket rendering / quick tests for our artists. We therefore don&rsquo;t &lsquo;queue&rsquo; our jobs as traditional CGI / FX artists would. We just need to funnel as much power as possible when the time comes to test a render / kick out a high-resolution draft.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> Just old fashioned backburner. Keep it simple.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> we created our own tools</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> For still image we just let the workstation render overnight and use several render farm nodes for each workstation. For animation we use backburner. There are 3rd party tools to manage the process, but I heard some companies are still having some issue with the 3rd party tools. Right now we are still comfortable with backburner and how we do the render.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> We use of the shelf tools, Simplicity is sometimes underrated.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue:</b> Currently exploring 3rd party tools. To date have been able to manage with native tools within 3dsmax/vray/corona.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> As I mentioned before we are using included utilities in our pipeline. There are just couple of situations when we thought it would be better, but went back to standards.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> Backburner is a quick and easy solution but we have tested a lot of good tools.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-pure1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol9/v9-pure1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="252" /></a><span style="color: #000000;">Image Courtesy: Pure</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Have you run into any issues with power consumption and the amount of hardware that needs to be run? Explain the challenges and what you had to change.</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>Not really</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>When we moved to our new office we were worried about it so the smarter move we did was hiring the higher power range with the electric co. We run some nice &ldquo;power consuming&rdquo; devices, kitchen (that gets really crowded at some moments of the day) and also cooling system can give you some headaches if you don't plan it. Also coffee machines are really demanding&hellip;we love to drink high quality coffee.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>We had terrible issues with our server room cooling and power for a while, all of which were the fault of the systems in our building. Most buildings aren&rsquo;t meant for such power-intensive operations. We spent lots of time putting systems in place to warn about problems and to react accordingly (automatic shutdowns, backup power, etc.). Like data backup, power backup is a huge but critical expense that can&rsquo;t be underestimated.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Yes in our last two offices we had power cuts all the time. In our new office we built the electrics from scratch and we have had fewer issues. Something always blows at some point.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph:</b> Not too many issues with power consumption. Being a small/medium firm, we just make sure all computers are on battery backups with voltage regulators.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR: </b>Our workstations generate a lot of heat and noise. We are thinking about upgrading our offices so that the workstations can be located elsewhere than where we sit.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape: </b>We have the whole Data Center on UPSs which takes planning, but was grown rather organically, we started with one APC Symmetra LX 8kVA, then added another, then another, we just moved and decommissioned one and added a APC Symmetra PX 30KW &nbsp;3 phase system. These 3 UPSs are able to run the entire data center in the case of a power failure.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> Not really. There are power considerations, but this is one of the more predictable aspects of configuring a system. We calculate the maximum load power requirements of all our servers and make sure that we specify the appropriate power supplies. On that subject, when we first set everything up we accidently placed our PSU on a 3AMP instead of a 12AMP kettle cable. This resulted in our fans failing and our MD having to make a 3am emergency trip to the office as our server was sending email warnings that all our hard-drives were overheating. Good times.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> Sure, we were in a shitty old building years ago and we would lose power all the time once we sent a heavy animation sequence. I think it really depends on the building you are in and how their electrical is set up.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> Our electricity bill is huge. &nbsp;When we moved in the office space we took care that we got five special lines on top of what it normal so we secured the power supply.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> This is always the biggest challenge mostly for small studio like us back then. As you know firstly I worked as a freelancer at my own house, then kept growing. When you are at the stage growing, you will always be faced with this problem. <br /> Here, there is a power limit, the government count is per house. If you want to get a bigger limit, you need to pay lots of money for it. The price for the electricity is also different. This is the hardest part in our life, when we were able to buy a render farm but we could not run it because we didn&rsquo;t &nbsp;have the power capacity. &nbsp;Fortunately we managed to buy three properties side by side in Bali, and we set the power limit quite high for each property. We can use it for our new office without any problem and the running cost will not that big.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> Yes. Power consumption and proper power outlets are not to be ignored, also knowing what are the power requirements for hardware. For this you&rsquo;ll need specialised help, this is dangerous.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue:</b> Yes blowing circuits has led to the installation of additional 110 and 220 circuits in our office space for the workstations and servers.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> Yes, I mentioned it in our hard lessons, at some point we replaced our old farm, with new and bigger one. And once it was installed everything was fine, there was some slow projects in a couple of weeks, but then we&rsquo;ve got bigger project with huge amount of rendering, and once the farm was up in full speed there was situations when the power outage started. A couple times we didn&rsquo;t notice the reason, but we solved it quickly but updating the wiring and some stuff which I not really familiar with. Now it&rsquo;s almost three times more powerful than it needs to be in areas where the farm is located, to be sure this will not happen even if will add more nodes later.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> A well known blade render system made us pay 4 times the nowadays energy consumption because the stability of the CPUs and a lot of fancy features we haven't used anytime. &nbsp;Moving to an easy, tailor made server without any cooling feature gave us a flexibility and low consumption solution.</p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Thu, 07 Dec 2017 16:09:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/12/142552.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/12/business-in-arch-viz-vol-9---it-infrastructure--networking-part-2-of-2Business in Arch Viz. Vol. 8 - IT Infrastructure &amp; Networking (Part 1 of 2)Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/11/business-in-arch-viz-vol-8---it-infrastructure--networking-part-1-of-2"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/11/142065.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><br /></a>Welcome to the seventh installment of our new&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">here</a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/BaB1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/BaB1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="504" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy Beauty &amp; the Bit</p> <p class="p1"><b><br /></b></p> <p class="p1"><b>How different is it to manage a network for visualization professionals and visualization departments vs other service based companies (architects, designers, photographers etc.)?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>We handle really large number of files and data. Regular networks can collapse pretty easy if they are not planned. Not all of the IT professionals understand the amount of information we can generate in a year.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit:</b> In some strange way it is much more specialized. You probably will need much more horsepower for some tasks. And the half life of the equipment could be less than in other service based companies as you mention.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen:</b> It&rsquo;s more akin to a small vfx house if you do a lot of animation. So we would be considered super users. Our needs far surpass that of any other architects service company in terms of equipment, server speed, data, storage and computing.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph:</b> The biggest difference between managing a network for visualization professionals vs other service based companies is mainly keeping the data pipeline and I/O from the server consistent as possible because one slight hiccup in the network from dropped packets to a small interruption in the network and whole animations could be wasted.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> All service based companies face technology challenges, although I would say that visualization companies have some difficult ones. The most prominent element of our data room is the render farm, with between 80 and 100 1U rack mounted blade workstations, we face power/heat/noise loads larger than most.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">There needs to be special consideration made for all three. The power units (UPS&rsquo;s) maintain redundancy of power (we have a 15-20 min &ldquo;rundown&rdquo; window in case of failure) the AHU (air handling unit) is an 8 ton unit which we are currently evaluating for upgrading. When re-building our office recently (we moved from &nbsp;the 5th floor of our building to the 7th) we had to carefully design the wall construction so there is minimal sound pollution into the main office space. Our largest investment is not our farm but our storage pool, we have clustering storage from Isilon (EMC) this storage pool is &ldquo;scale up / scale out&rdquo; as we add nodes to make the pool bigger we get more dynamic connections to the cluster. We currently have about 600 TB of storage, dynamically served over 24 10GB fiber connections to the company. We also have a 10Gb point to point connection between our office in NYC and Boston. This allows the NYC artists to access the storage pool and render farm at near-local connection speeds. For our more remote users we establish hardware VPN tunnels for secure traffic. No matter how fast the connections, or render power, or machine speed, we always seem to saturate it, so we constantly strive to refine pipelines so that artists can work as fast as possible.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>The Digit Group: </b>Visualization needs high performance machines in order to produce high quality deliverables and will be a major driver of how profitable you are. &nbsp;Other network infrastructures are not using the same amount of power. &nbsp;I am keeping my eye on Cloud-based solutions, but have not been overly impressed with the offerings at the moment.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> The big difference with our industry is storage requirements and all the challenges that come with working with large files. These files need to be served quickly to all our individual PCs, they need to be backed up locally and offsite without slowing down our network and they also need to be stored locally. We often transfer around 150GB per day over the network, ensuring there are no bottlenecks across the system is crucial for efficiency. The same goes for the architectural industry, large plans and files need to be distributed / printed quickly and efficiently.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> Not much different other than we use space much faster.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> more machines, faster machines, faster network for heavy data transfer and redundant backup system</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> I think it's not about how different we manage a network for archviz vs other service. It's about the size of the company itself. For example, when we were still 4-5 artist, we only used low end storage system and low end switches. Since everything is low end, the bandwidth is not big enough but we still were able to manage it. When we became bigger, like 10 artists, we needed bigger bandwidth because bigger bandwidth meant more speed to access the server, rendering time, etc. The most important thing is how you can limit your artists from accessing a specific folder. and how you can make sure they cannot get any files from the server. We can use windows servers, but it can cost a lot of money, or you can use linux based storage which are free.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> The large file sizes are a very big contributor to differentiate between normal office and home networks, also the larger packages need to be available to all users and servers from the same location in the network so NAS is a must in this configurations.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>Depending on the size of the company the primary difference is the data load and throughput requirements.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House: </b>At TH I would say it is very close to what it in others companies, we have same routers, same cables, what we have done a little differently, is just doubled it in mind. All cards are Gigabit speed, drives on NAS all not less than 7200 rpm. Because size of the projects almost doubling in size of Gb every year, we have to be ahead of collapse. Even this summer we a going to double our file server from 50tb to 100tb and with new technologies coming projects are going to be larger and larger.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> Quite different, more of the archviz companies work with still renderings but we are working with a huge render farm in-house dealing with tons of TIFs and rendering elements throughout the network feeding realtime postproduction of sequences that can require a ultra fast broadband network. Our goal is having different networks and servers to split 3d data and frames and elements avoiding traffic collapses our network.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/FF1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/FF1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="302" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy Factory Fifteen</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>How hard was it to learn all of the nuances of a network built around rendering?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>We were in this industry for so long that this item was based on an organic growth. We currently have in ArX specific professionals dedicated to this matter that know exactly how to handle our IT necessities.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit:</b> It is a never ending process. Each year there are new installments, novelties, upgrades. I guess the best way to act is not being overwhelmed by that. Sometimes analysis is paralysis so you have to use what works for you.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor:</b> It has taken us years to learn about all the nuances of a visualization network. Experimenting and gathering data takes a lot of time, and it is combined with production needs.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Very hard. You can do it alone to a certain extent, but there comes a time when you need support. The trick is that support is rarely full time so you can&rsquo;t justify the cost of a dedicated I.T. person. We are lucky as we have a 3D artist who has experience with networking who freelances remotely for us. He does everything from Manchester.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape: </b>Well, it&rsquo;s been 23 years, and I still don&rsquo;t know all the nuances. I would say that using an established 3rd party render management system takes much of the guesswork and problems out of the system. There were times, that if a job was submitted to the farm, it could crash the network as all the render slaves competed for the same bandwidth to open the file and all the links contained. For the most part those challenges have gone away, but there will always be challenges about managing how machines are traded between distributed rendering and frame-based rendering. Getting all users to participate in the rendering when they leave for the evening. These are among the nuances, of which there are too many to mention.</p> <p class="p3"><b><span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></b></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>The nuances of building and maintaining a network for rendering was extremely hard. Due to the niche knowledge that is needed to implement specific programs that require specific protocols and license servers needing the correct MAC and IP addresses from multiple machines and trying to make sure all the ports were open, secure and were not tied to any other programs or protocols.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR: </b>We have never had any issues with the network. Our systems are very basic, just a couple computers and a network.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>The Digit Group: </b>I am not sure if it was hard, as much as it was frustrating at times. &nbsp;It felt like one step forward then two steps back at time. &nbsp;We have good solutions now, but will always look to improve as the cycle time speed directly affects our profits.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes: </b>Marvin (Founding Partner) has a strong set of IT skills (not bad at table tennis either), therefore this came quite naturally and wasn&rsquo;t that hard to do. We enlisted the help of another IT friend where necessary and quickly learned this ins and outs. We also received advice from the companies we purchased our hardware from like Synology and DELL. These guys have dedicated teams to help you find the best solution for your business.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square: </b>You are basically just adding some extra computers to the network which are accessible by everyone at the office. In my opinion it&rsquo;s pretty basic.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> &hellip;.not too hard. We always tried to build up something stable and for the future</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> For someone who does not understand networks, this is a very complicated problem. I was lucky that I learned about networking in the past. Although i am not that expert, it help sme to know how to setup a network in a basic way.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> When you are inclined and like to learn the specifics not much, but I can imagine it can be overwhelming.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>Coming up as a renderer myself I would say that I learned as I go. By the time I was required to manage a network for our company I had the past experience of seeing how operations at my previous employment could be used for our company. This removed a lot of the potential errors that could have occurred.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House: </b>Not really hard, the hardest part was only investment into it. We find out that speed of network is the most important for us, and then quickly found the solution.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> It was kind of trying to identify where and when the network is collapsing and from there trying to organize several networks and servers to store and deliver different sorts of data and traffic in the right way. That was a test-failure process over the years.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/FF2-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/FF2-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="302" /><br /></a>Image Courtest Factory Fifteen</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>How do you go about deciding which workstations to purchase? Is it the biggest machine within budget or do you have specific requirements that you meet?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>This has been changing in our company. Based on our experience we prefer to have multiple computers rather than a few very expensive ones. Based on our experience giving to our 3D Artists super computers always killed common sense and smart optimization because it was always easier to use brute force. But at the end, a few months later they were once again complaining that the computers were not fast enough. We started several years ago when computer power was a problem, counting polygons and keeping that count low was a priority. Nowadays I feel that artists are not paying enough attention in optimization.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>Generally is not big deal, just machines that make your technical everyday life easier. Obviously horsepower is important, but using your brain is much more important. We have a geeky component but far from being obsessed with the latest available processor or workstation.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>It&rsquo;s important for us that all machines are of relatively equal capability. Therefore, we determine a budget and work towards prioritized specifications, maximizing what we can get within that budget.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>We have a standard check box and every year update it to the latest CPU and GPU. We hardly think about it now. We ring up PC specialist, and order two more per year on average.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"><span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>I feel as time has gone on, learning the power necessary for the artists to perform at their highest capabilities, there was a balance that had to be achieved between building the most efficient PC and budget. Since we get our machines custom built, there is flexibility that allows us to achieve the balance between efficiency and budget rather than buying pre built computers.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR: </b>We buy the most powerful workstations we can find (within reason) in order to render as much as possible locally and to not weigh down the network unnecessarily. We always stack our work stations with as much RAM as possible.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape: </b>We usually go with &ldquo;good&rdquo; but not &ldquo;great&rdquo; the final 5% bump in speed can often cost 50% more, so we don&rsquo;t get the absolute top of the line, we go a notch or 2 down. We do tend to get as much memory as we can. These days it makes sense to get well reviewed graphic card, although we may be beyond the days of needing &ldquo;Workstation&rdquo; class cards. The top of the line gaming cards have gotten so good, we tend to use those. We try to keep generations of machines the same so we can have generic disk images that can roll out to the entire organization.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>The Digit Group: </b>We have recently moved from a machine in a budget resource restriction to specific requirements to best meet the needs of our clients. &nbsp;It took many years to mature to this model.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> We haven&rsquo;t yet made the step to explore GPU rendering, so save for a few computers that our media guys use we like to bulk up the horsepower of a PC as much as we can. Most our PCs have either strong i7s CPUs or dual Xeons. We even have two PCs which have very high-end spec dual Xeons which we use for any 3D intensive projects.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> We typically get a workstation with a fast graphics card that can handle heavy models, and keep the processors fast but not loads of cores. The render farm does the rest. Plus soon everything will be GPU based anyways.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> We used to buy always the second best. But it turned out to buy the best (even if it&acute;s just 10% more speed) makes sense. The biggest costs go to the artists who wait. Therefore it makes sense to pay for machines instead of waiting artists.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> Lately I always choose xeon. The i7 is just too slow. When I choose Xeon processor, I usually count the price per core. Usually, the latest build always have the most expensive price. &nbsp;I choose several series and count the price per core. Once I see there is a series that is too expensive and not worth the speed (usually the latest build) I will not choose that series. Budget...this is quite tricky, and obviously the most irrelevant thing when we are discussing about investment. I just don&rsquo;t understand why people keep saying budget budget budget and budget. If the workstation is too expensive for you right now, then save some money and wait for couple months until you can get it. Yes you need to sacrifice your personal needs for a couple of months, but, investment is investment. Investment is always for long term, never for short term. A lot of people don't want to sacrifice their comfort zone until they know what will happen when they stick around in their comfort zone too long.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> First we decide the budget we can work with, then considering the direction of the company we decide on the hardware, like if we&rsquo;ll invest on CPU only or combine CPU and GPU or go full GPU, etc.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue:</b> Our minimum requirements are pretty high and we max out our budget just hitting those internal needs.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> Here is a very tricky situation.Uusually machine last about 4-5 years, trying to predict what you will need in this time frame very hard, but by analyzing speed of innovation in PC industry we definitely can be sure that small upgrades are visible in this time frame. There is no way you spend 20k on PC and it will last 10 years, you will be out from upgrade in 4-5 years, because different connectors, chips and sockets will not be compatible with newer processors, old processors will not be compatible with newest GPUs. It is better to pay twice by 10k than for one.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> Our specs are really defined based on the graphic card, network connection and quick hard disk and CPU as everybody else. &nbsp;But we do prefer to build our own workstations with a local dealer to achieve the right specs.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/Kil1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/Kil1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy Kilograph<a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/Kil1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><br /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>How involved are the visualization artists in your management of the network and the machines?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>Not much. We have in house employees who are in charge of this specific area.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>Artists in our company are artists, more worried about the images than in render cores.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>Little to no involvement. We have a dedicated IT specialist and a Technical Director that manage our pipeline and network.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Very little aside from asset management and resourcing.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>At Kilograph, it is a team of senior visualization artists, the IT director, and management that coordinate the effort to manage our network where communication and execution are paramount to minimize downtown and maximize efficiency. Management of a sophisticated network environment cannot be done with only one person, and as we grow as a company, we learn how to manage our network as a team.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR:</b> A group of our artists run the network and machines. We use an outside partner for setting up the hardware.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> As little as possible. We have a 3 or 4 month cycle of disk image roll-outs, we build a &ldquo;test&rdquo; machine will have all the software, plugins, upgrades, versions, and then invite a select group to test everything. We make sure that we have licensing for all the software and that everything will play nicely on the network &nbsp;and render farm. These &ldquo;Builds&rdquo; are made for Macs and PCs. Once the builds have been tested on both platforms by the select stakeholders, (Motion graphic, Film, 3d, Graphic design, Project management) then we &ldquo;Image&rdquo; all the machines, everyone is given warning to make sure any personal data is backed up or copied off to a safe place on the network, and over the span of a few days all machines (including render units) are overwritten with a full clean install, from the OS to all the software. Then the users can log into their machines, copy any data back and keep working. We typically keep a few generations of software so that projects don&rsquo;t have to switch mid-stream.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>The Digit Group: </b>Our visualization artists are part of the business process team as well as the technology team when it concerns capital expenses for IT.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> Not at all. We want our artists to be focused on the work and not have to worry about infrastructure. If there are suggestions for improvements from technical artists we of course welcome the feedback. For now, we maintain the approach that all network and technical issues be handled by our talented I.T. guys, who basically, turn it off and on again.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> Depends on the artist really. If they are comfortable with IT, they can problem solve some things on their own which is great.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> Not really. They concentrate on their work. But of course we listen to their preferences in terms of monitors etc.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio: </b>Same as any render engine developer. They need their customer to give them &nbsp;feedback. The more they can get, the more they know what is the problem on their render engine, and what kind of features that their customers want. So, I can say my team has the biggest influence when I make a decision. I want to hear what kind of problem they are facing on the current network. What is their wishlist? How can we make it work?<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha: </b>Very. Although server class hardware is stable by design, we need the capacity to deploy changes, fixes or upgrades ourselves and not waiting for a IT company to understand our requirements and do the work, saving time and money.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue:</b> Being a small studio our artists are heavily involved. When updates are required we send out links with patches to be run to all artists. This saves the time from an admin running all updates or requiring more expensive software management tools.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> Not much, but definitely most of them understand all aspects and can find out what cause any issues, and explain to IT personal.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> Since keeping the files small and saving space to improve renderings is a must in our industry to get renders quick. Every artist in the office knows about the importance of having clean the network of useless traffic.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/arx1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/arx1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="376" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy ArX Solutions</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>How do you plan the network to accommodate a visualization pipeline? What sort of hardware is required and how do you specify the individual components? (i.e. bandwidth, network topology, storage etc.)</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>We use Windows Storage Servers which are perfectly fitted to handle large amount of files and data. Our network is a double gigabit network. Storage is a constant problem, we double our storage capacity every two years.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>For us a good internet connection is obviously vital and also a nice rack of NAS&acute; since they run out of capacity in short time due to our production. We are really prolific so we need a nice storage system. Also backup system is important.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>This is a question worthy of several pages of answers. The short answer is, we plan for maximum efficiency rather than brute force power. Our strategy is to have fewer powerful pieces of hardware with an intelligent management system (rather than many less powerful pieces). Storage is something that can become a runaway train, so we try to analyze storage needs and place priorities in terms of speed, volume and redundancy. Backup is probably the greatest challenge and it&rsquo;s very important to build a system that can handle not just storage volume but backup volume as well.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen:</b> 3D work and rendering is massively demanding of IT resources, it is a matter of buying the best you can afford and balancing the kit to avoid bottlenecks. The price performance ratio is far higher from &lsquo;gaming&rsquo; rigs than it is for a specialised 3D rendering system from the likes of HP or Dell. In the long run the hardware in the XEON based workstations will be more reliable, but even so it is hard to justify the additional expense unless you have a large budget and/or no onsite IT support.</p> <p class="p1">Workstation spec is fairly straightforward, buy a custom high end gaming/3D rig, specify as much RAM as you can afford (64GB ideally) and the CPU with the highest GHz / &pound; (normally Hex core i7)</p> <p class="p1">Investing in reliable server hardware, (XEON and RAID 10) offers disk redundancy and performance benefits. We use bonded gigabit connections to a pair of Cisco switches to ensure there are no network bottlenecks on the server.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">FF invested in laying CAT6 cable in the new studio running to a dedicated patch panel, this increases reliability and reduces confusion.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">We load balance 2 fibre internet connections on a dedicated hardware firewall.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">And don&rsquo;t forget good chairs! A vital piece of hardware.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph:</b> Planning for a network to accommodate a visualization pipeline is hard to gauge. It is a moving target. Growth and future projections play a huge role in the planning process. We do not want to overbuy as that greatly affects the firm financially, and we do not want to under buy as that greatly affects the firm&rsquo;s efficiency. The moving target that is the visualization pipeline can only be described as future proofing the network as much as possible through smart utilization of every component from server network cards, RAID cards, switches (1G or 10G), and establishing a network hierarchy that is least detrimental to the visualization artists work flor.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR:</b> I don't think that anyone in our office (including the people in charge) can answer this question. We are not that tech-oriented. We just buy what our service provider suggest and then it works.</p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> Our network grew like most I think, organically, we didn&rsquo;t have a 5 or 10 year plan, we would add some hardware, and then support it, as best we can. Our switching infrastructure is based on 2 Cisco 4500 series switch chassis, with 10 gb line cards, 48 port 1Gb cards and a handful of other specialized hardware. This switching gear provides more than enough backplane speed. This along with our EMC Isilon storage cluster allows us to serve up maximum speed to the workstations on the floor in both Boston and NYC (through our 10Gb point to point connection). We also utilize VLANs to organize the network into logical sections, ie. the render farm is on it own &ldquo;subnet&rdquo; the Boston PCs, the Macs, the NYC office, the servers, monitoring equipment, guest wifi, company wifi, all on separate subnets on the network, &nbsp;both to separate traffic but also keep everything straight.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> A pipeline is a good way of thinking about it. A bottleneck anywhere along the pipeline can bring everything to a screeching halt so we must think of performance from start to finish. We&rsquo;ve found the two most important aspects are network bandwidth and storage I/O performance. In terms of network performance this means elements as simple as &lsquo;well installed Cat 6 cabling&rsquo; (a lot of poor network performance comes from bad cables) to complex elements such as the correct RAID configurations and SSD caching. Our servers also plug into the network via 10Gb ethernet connections. Storage is also a big challenge as we always need more, and the amount we need is ever increasing. We used to run all our storage in a RAID 10 configuration for speed but over time this became prohibitively expensive. As technology has improved we have moved to a hybrid RAID system where our workstations talk to a bank of SSDs that sit in front of a RAID 6 partition. This gives huge cost savings at a similar performance.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> Loads of storage.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> hm... I guess I always start with the storage size, then the storage speed, then the switch, the bandwidth, then the network topology.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha: </b>It&rsquo;s a very straight forward plan in a small user count office, get the fastest most reliable connection you can afford, manage user access and permissions and share on network drives, this way we centralize all information and can manage backups and security in one place.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>Our network grew organically as the company grew so did the network components. We started with a couple workstations networked to a local drive share. That grew into small business server with a direct attached storage. Followed by multiple virtual servers networked with a 10GB backplane and a Dell Compellent SSD hybrid data storage.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House: </b>Simply saying - every project has to be done on the server, that farm and every artist and PM can have access to it right away. There is probably a single situation when we have local NAS for very first initial cut of filmed material, because to transfer 3-6tb to the server just impossible to transfer quickly. But in most cases as mentioned earlier every machine has 1Gbit cards, to have comfortable speed to the server.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations: </b>Splitting data and traffic in a key to success&hellip; 2 servers, 3d data and frames and elements and 2 networks to avoid collapsing</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/fp1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/fp1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="769" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy PixelFlakes</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Do you design all of the IT and system infrastructure yourself or bring in outside consultants?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>We use consultants, but at the end our experience is really what matters.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: &nbsp;</b>Outside consultants. We prefer to leave that to professionals and reserve ourselves to the creative part of the process.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>Mostly in-house.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>We had a base and the built everything from scratch with outside consultants when we could afford it. We had so many issues when we were doing it ourselves. It really pays off in the long run if you invest in proper systems.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>The IT and system infrastructure is an effort between me, an outside consultant, and a computer builder with years of experience in the industry.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape:</b> We only use outside consultants only when we are implementing a new technology or component, and we include it with the purchase of the equipment. For the most part, the core components and support systems of our business continuity are designed in house. Outside consultants tend to underestimate our needs, and it takes so long to bring them up to speed about our requirements that we just do most everything ourselves. We also occasionally bring in consultants from time to time to pitch new technologies, workflows, or systems. We have adopted more web-based workflow technologies, sales tracking, timesheets, project tracking, mail, conferencing, there are many reasonable SaaS systems that have been a big help in running our business, these tend to be asset light, as we don&rsquo;t want too many assets living outside of our control, these are support systems that don&rsquo;t take up much bandwidth.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>The Digit Group: </b>Outside consultants along with an internal process team.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> We do it all ourselves.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square:</b> A mix of both. We do most of the renderfarm and workstations ourselves, and also work with an outside IT company to build some of the storage systems and such.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Pure:</b> Outside. We used to do it in-house. But we are too small to have a permanent IT person and too big to do it ourselves.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> First I design on my own. Most of the time in my company I always try to find the information first so at least I know the basic logic. Then I bring in outside consultants. I am lucky that my IT consultants are also the one who supply all my computer needs, and he is very passionate about IT. So now he is in charge on all my IT and system infrastructure. I can say, I am at the right hand.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> For simplicity sake we do all ourselves.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>Up into last year, internally. Last year, we brought on a consultant.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> I would say we are designing the main idea and then discuss it with an IT company.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> As with lawyers, it's quite difficult to bring in somebody not used to working with archviz to the point of understanding the deep and different behaviour of the network performance in our industry. We do prefer to ask our IT external guys for specific features of the hardware and get them advising us with the right one instead a whole view of the infrastructure.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/sb1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/sb1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="378" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy Steelblue</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>When building out a render farm what are the specific challenges you run into and how do you address them.</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>There's always the choice between a big computer with many cores (like Boxx) or the option to have more computers with less processing power. Lately we have been testing second generation servers with exceptional results.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>We haven't got a huge renderfarm for the moment compared to other companies but the most challenging part was the noise level. In the end the best solution was to soundproof a whole room of the office.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>The single greatest challenge is harnessing all the available power in an efficient way. We use Deadline and have customized it completely to make our farm as efficient as possible. Other challenges include physical environment (cooling, power, security), component issues and software versioning.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Main issue is bandwidth space so you can actually save your renders iles from 30 machines at the same time at 4k with 20 passes in each render. You simply need super fast cables and a dedicated server in full RAID to manage that. The second biggest issue is software, updates and maintenance, solved through taking the time to create software rollouts for the basics and smart shortcuts to specific spaces on the server accessible from all machines quickly. Also using some form of remote desktop so you can access each machine from a central computer or even from another city.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>The challenges that I run into every time I spec out a render farm is threefold: life span, efficiency, and integration in the future. Life span of a render farm is important because making one wrong move could cripple a firm for months financially and not getting the efficiency that we thought we paid for. Efficiency is dictated by the types of components that are being spec&rsquo;d out because as we all know time is money, and with more time being utilized to perfect that render or animation and less time twiddling your thumbs waiting for a render to finish, it&rsquo;s a win win for everyone. Lastly, integration for the future is the most important, because these things need to last for years, and with new technology coming out daily it seems, forecasting new tech and specifying components correctly to integrate later on will add years to the life of a render farm.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>MIR:</b> We have never built a renderfarm. We just use all the downgraded workstations for this purpose. The main challenge is that the newer machines have more RAM, hence the renderfarm can not deal with newer and heavier scenes. Since we have a very basic setup, it can be a pain in the ass to update things, like Windows or other software since it is not automated.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape: </b>Power/Heat/Noise, &nbsp;a render farm is nothing more than a bunch of dumb workstations in a convenient form factor so that they may be put in a closet or room to do their work and (hopefully) be left alone. The problem arises when calculating the amount of power needed for the farm under full load, the amount of heat that it will create when working, and the noise it will create when many machines close to each other. Rendering is a specialized process that is highly tuned to use 100% of the CPU 100% of the time possible. This is great for getting lots of rendering done, but terrible for heat management, the power it consumes and the wear and tear on the computer as it works under this great load. These computers tend to have components fail, more heat will shorten their lives even shorter.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes: </b>The main challenges we found were storage space and efficient cooling. We have 12 render nodes spread out over 8U of rack space. Each of these nodes have dual Xeons and onboard graphics. We knew that for the foreseeable future we would need a CPU loaded render farm, so invested our budget towards business grade CPUs as opposed to GPU. These nodes sound like a small plane taking off when turned on, so we needed to ensure they were sound insulated and cooled, two things which don&rsquo;t really go hand in hand. Moving into our new office this summer will allow us to have an independent server room which should help us solve both problems. In the interim we use the APC acoustic server racks which great. We also have a portable aircon unit pointed straight at it, which we turn on in the summer!<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square: </b>The next challenge will probably be - when should we start investing in a GPU based farm.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio: </b>The challenge is always about picking the right processor and the RAM and then the bandwidth to transfer the file on each render farm and the other workstation. As I mentioned previously, I always count the price per core. As for the ram, we need to know the RAM management. On workstation, we usually install lots of things, and lots of startup, and we also need to know that open an empty 3dsmax file can consume 3 GB of ram alone. Opening a big scene mostly with tons of foliage and lots of detailed object, it can consume more than 32 gb. not mentioning the rendering. I love to do some research. and I did lots of tests back then. Another example, on V-ray, you can choose to see only the small preview of your image while rendering, this is also to save lots of RAMs if you have a very limited RAM. So most of our workstation, we use 128 gb of RAM, and for our render farm, we use 64 GB of RAM, because a render farm doesn't need to open any 3dsmax files.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> Upgradeability, power management and noise. We solved this by not using a local render farm.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue: </b>The first issue is power load. Our office had enough open breakers on the electrical panel so this was overcome by bringing in an electrical consultant to run more dedicated circuits in the office. However, we are now utilizing the amount of juice possible in this particular office without more significant investment.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> Low energy consumption, low noise and easy refrigeration. We moved three years ago from a well-known international company to a local one to address these issues and get them solved we cut the energy a 75%, no noise and easy refrigeration with the new CPUs and even more without any case and just attached to glass plates</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/neo1-v8.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol8/neo1-v8-sm.jpg" width="630" height="553" /><br /></a>Image Courtesy Neoscape<br /><br /></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>When building storage array what are the specific challenges you run into and how do you address them?</b></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>ArX Solutions: </b>Redundancy is the key. You can't think about having a serious company with redundancy and hot spare drives.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Beauty and the Bit: </b>As I said we feel really prolific nowadays&hellip;we are like Geeky Beatles in Rubber Soul era <span class="s1">☺</span> So the main concern is to have a good storage system which does not run out quick. Each year we upgrade our system we think it will last a lot but happily it doesn't (which means the business is growing).</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Designstor: </b>The greatest challenge when building storage arrays is the required performance. Most arrays are designed for database-related performance (many small bits of data) but our needs are for speed in dealing with very large sized data. Maximizing performance is expensive, and implementing often exposes bottlenecks in the rest of a system (cabling, switches, etc.).</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Factory Fifteen: </b>Keep everything simple, Microsoft works well with Microsoft, so build a MS server and administer all network shares and security updates through a Windows domain environment. It will be more reliable and secure than running a NAS, although admittedly more challenging to set up. &nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">Ensure you have speed, reliability, and enough network bandwidth.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Kilograph: </b>Storage arrays are tricky because right off the bat the question runs through my head, what RAID do I need to use for this specific array. RAID 6 and you get more storage, but less I/O. RAID 10 and you get less storage, but more I/O. Addressing this, I coordinate with the senior artists, and management to determine the use of the array and through that coordination, determine the necessary RAID for that array. The hard drive choice and the SAN/NAS housing those drives are the most challenging because the hard drives dictate the I/O as much as the components that the SAN/NAS comes with because as building a render farm, life span, efficiency, and integration are paramount those files being stored will need to stay there safe and sound for years. Lastly, Integrating and creating protocols for artists is the last challenge, because as we all know, when artists see more storage, they jump for joy. File management and protocols are key to keeping a clean and efficient array and the only way that can be done is in depth and thorough coordination with the artists and communication is the only way that can be accomplished.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Neoscape: </b>Our Isilon is an expensive solution but it is proof that you get what you pay for, The ability for speed, scalability, along with redundancy at a OS level makes a very powerful system.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>PixelFlakes:</b> We must achieve a balance between performance and redundancy. This isn&rsquo;t unique, except that our performance requirements are much greater than a typical office network. In our early days, it made sense from both perspectives to build an array configured in RAID 10, with high specification enterprise drives. This results in fantastic performance, however as you grow, over time, it becomes prohibitively expensive. The problem is that we have become used to (and require for smooth workflow) this high performance. Eventually we decided to trial using new NAS boxes with most storage running in RAID 6, fronted by a small bank of high performance SSDs running in RAID 10. This sort of SSD caching has really made a big difference. We also only use high end consumer NAS drives. They are reliable and perform exceptionally well at a much lower cost than traditional enterprise drives.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Public Square: </b>How much storage can we get before it gets too expensive, and let's make sure there is enough redundancy. We have had a server fail in the past - not fun.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>2G Studio:</b> The challenge is to decide how big is your storage size is. It&rsquo;s going to dictate what type of your storage hardware (Synology or QNAP). The hardware itself is very expensive, so we decided to use two storage systems. One is using high end storage hardware for the main files, and second is using lower end storage hardware for the secondary files such as video tutorials, entertainment (music and videos), references images and videos. Modeling projects, etc.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Ricardo Rocha:</b> Transfer Speed, Redundancy, capacity and backup, user security and user management and configuration. We use enterprise grade hardware and software like RAID storage, internet redundancy, firewall, and gateway services. Also we rely on a domain network setup for user management and configuration. Other stuff is virtualization to test and deploy.</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Steelblue:</b> The biggest issue is maintaining enough space. Dumping to tape and a secondary array has allowed us to keep files accessible while maintaining enough active project space. 40+ TB for active projects</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Transparent House:</b> Storage is the most important piece. If you run out of space, your studio is slowing down every day, not enough space, projects age getting more expensive, while you spending time on figuring out how to solve it. &nbsp;The speed of network is slowing down, because all system is dependent on the server, because you can outsource rendering, you can outsource modeling, but no way to outsource storage. The internet is not there where you can work this remotely.</p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"></p> <p class="p1"><b>Urban Simulations:</b> it was difficult to decide between quick response and large storage for the same budget, finally we decided to score them, 75% quick and 25% larger storage system</p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Sun, 12 Nov 2017 13:07:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/11/142065.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/11/business-in-arch-viz-vol-8---it-infrastructure--networking-part-1-of-2Transparent House Reimagines Sutro Tower in San FranciscoJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/11/transparent-house-reimagines-sutro-tower-in-san-francisco"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138902.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/10x3.25_TH_Alctraz_01c_print_v3_111014.jpg" target="_blank"><strong><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/10x3.25_TH_Alctraz_01c_print_v3_111014-sm.jpg" width="630" height="204" /></strong></a></p> <p><strong>Can you tell us about Transparent house, how you got started and the type of work you specialize in?</strong></p> <p>Transparent House is a creative agency based in San Francisco, with offices in Moscow and Los Angeles. We specialize in photorealistic CGI and live action VFX for both real estate and product marketing &amp; advertising. TH was founded in 2004 to address the lack of high quality architectural visualization that was available to real estate developers in the early 2000s. but our services quickly expanded focus to 3D animation and product visualization. After 2010, Transparent House began producing live action video, and, in 2014, added an Interactive Department, specializing in Application Development and Virtual Reality.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Transparent House recently landed the cover of San Francisco magazine with an audacious image of a re-imagined Sutro Tower. &nbsp;Can you tell us a bit about the internal project that landed you this coveted spot?</strong></p> <p>In 2016, we conceived an internal marketing campaign that we called &ldquo;San Francisco Reimagined.&rdquo; It was predicated on the idea of transforming iconic SF landmarks into fantastic alternate realities &ndash; the TransAmerica Building became a wind farm, Alcatraz became single family homes, and the Sutro Tower became condos. We also did Coit Tower as a giant Christmas ornament. The concept may owe its origins to an original Virtual Reality greeting card that we produced for the 2015 Holiday Season (the first known commercial VR Holiday Card ever produced) where we strung the TA Building in holiday lights.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Final_Publishedjpg.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Final_Publishedjpg-sm.jpg" width="630" height="756" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/20141205_TH_Coit_Tower_Ad_Final.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/20141205_TH_Coit_Tower_Ad_Final-sm.jpg" width="630" height="872" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Can you tell us a bit about the backgrounds of the artists who worked on this project?</strong></p> <p>Hideki Kawata (Lead Artist) comes from a industrial design and engineering background where he used to design energy efficient lighting fixtures. &nbsp;After completing his graduate degree in Europe, he shifted gears and joined the gaming industry for a few years to develop games for the web and mobile devices. &nbsp;He now leads the technical development of VR at Transparent House and enjoy's fusing his industrial design and gaming experience to develop immersive experiences.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>I can imagine the reaction of the developers for the properties you re-imagined and the public in general must have been quite shocked? Any funny or unexpected opinions coming your way?</strong></p> <p>Haha. Well, yes, actually. The owners of the TA building actually called me (David) one day and prefaced the conversation with something along the lines of &lsquo;Don&rsquo;t worry, we&rsquo;re not going to sue you, but we want to talk.&rsquo; Turns out they had seen the ad and thought it was pretty cool. They came by our office and we discussed some great ideas for future projects.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>As this was an internal project, what was your ultimate goal and did you succeed?</strong></p> <p>We wanted to leverage our expertise in 3D Visualization to send a message to the greater Bay Area creative community and our clients &ndash; that not only are we experts at what we do, but our DNA is deeply woven into the fabric of San Francisco&hellip;and we have a sense of humor too. The idea was &lsquo;come to us and we&rsquo;ll get creative and help you push the boundaries on your marketing campaigns too&rsquo;. I feel it was absolutely successful in that we &lsquo;stirred the pot&rsquo; a bit, getting a lot of positive feedback from clients &amp; peers, as well as some negative feedback from critics who were uncomfortable with the idea of turning the tower into condos! I feel if the response is strong, positive or negative, you have done your job. There&rsquo;s nothing worse than a &lsquo;meh&rsquo; when it comes to advertising&hellip;</p> <p></p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/Trasamerica_Re-Imagined_CC_Ad.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/Trasamerica_Re-Imagined_CC_Ad-sm.jpg" width="630" height="873" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/20141110_TH_Alcatraz_Final.jpg" target="_blank"><strong><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/20141110_TH_Alcatraz_Final-sm.jpg" width="630" height="262" /></strong></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Can you walk us through how you decided up on the designs you did of each iconic piece of San Francisco architecture?</strong></p> <p>Main objective for each concept was to preserve the iconic form factor of each landmark while adding elements to make the use case unique. &nbsp;For example, we worked on Sutro Tower by setting certain geometric constraints for framing. &nbsp;We accurately modelled the Sutro Tower first then worked within the framing to add supporting elements for the condo, green roof, and observatory areas. &nbsp;A similar approach was taken for Transamerica Pyramid and Coit Tower. &nbsp;For Alcatraz, we modeled the existing island topography, blocked in the pre-existing prison structures and surrounding infrastructure first. &nbsp;We then built roads and plates for the homes to be built on, imagining a functional island.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Looking at each image, there was obviously very careful thought into the composition, grading and lighting. Can you talk us through some of the things you were focusing on and artistic details that were most important to the success of the image?</strong></p> <p>The first step was to create a highly detailed model of the concept, taking into account the smallest of details (bolts, brackets, etc.). &nbsp;The second step was situate the model in its environment and really dial in the camera angles to get a good balance in composition. &nbsp;The third and most important step was focused on lighting the scene, working on a variety of HDR's and fill lights to get good defining shadows, highlights and chromatic contrast. &nbsp;Texturing the model came last, where we baked in normal maps and created layered materials for final rendering.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Blend_1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Blend_1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="851" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Blend_2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Blend_2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="851" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_WhiteModel_1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_WhiteModel_1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="851" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Wireframe_1.jpg" target="_blank"><strong><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/transparenthouse/SF_Sutro_Wireframe_1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="851" /></strong></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>What was the most rewarding and most challenging part of this project?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>Challenge: Re-Imagining each landmark structure within acceptable / physically feasible bounds while still respecting the look, mood and feel of each iconic form. &nbsp;Each structure had to be recognizable yet look unique enough to look different but not too unrealistic. Reward: It's always the same for any creative project: Seeing our ideas come together to create a reality that does not exist that ultimately sells itself creatively.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Any there any plans to continue the series or use the models for another campaign?</strong></p> <p>Well, San Francisco Magazine came to us earlier this year because they loved the image of the Sutro Tower from our campaign and ended up using it on their April cover. Beyond that, we don&rsquo;t have plans for the models right now.</p> <p><strong>Do you have plans to do this type of marketing campaign again? Any hints as to what we might expect next?</strong></p> <p>At Transparent House, we are always thinking of ways to push the boundaries, regardless of the media. Today it&rsquo;s (still) print &amp; broadcast, and now we have Virtual Reality. Tomorrow it will be something different. Because good creative is always our focus, any way you slice it technology-wise, we will always strive to shake things up. I&rsquo;d say keep your eyes peeled for more non-traditional entries in the real estate marketing video sphere, some exciting interactive product marketing campaigns leveraging VR, and a few fun OOH deployments this year!</p>Thu, 09 Nov 2017 13:54:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138902.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/11/transparent-house-reimagines-sutro-tower-in-san-franciscoANIMA 2 | D2 Vienna Conference 2017Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/10/anima-2--d2-vienna-conference-2017"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/10/141434.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/np6p6rCCaZY?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p class="p1"><br />For two days each year, the d2 Vienna hosts one of the largest gathering of architectural visualization artists in the world. Converging from 26 countries worldwide, attendees from visualization studios, architecture offices, advertising agencies, and software companies come together to share knowledge and meet new faces in the industry.<br /><br /></p> <p class="p2"><b>This year Michael McCarthy presented "Breathing life into Architectural Renderings and Animations", a collection of nice ideas and artwork done with the use of ANIMA 2 and #AXYZ 3d Human characters.<br /><br /></b></p> <p class="p1">Michael McCarthy, an accomplished 3D artist and trainer from Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Michael&rsquo;s skills in the 3D field are built on many years of fine arts training. Character animation and photo real rendering are among Michael&rsquo;s passions. As an author and contributor to many 3D publications like 3D Artist, and 3D World Magazine as well as book titles including &ldquo;Inside 3ds Max&rdquo;, &ldquo;Harnessing 3ds Max&rdquo;, &ldquo;Animation with Biped&rdquo;, and &ldquo;How to Cheat in 3ds Max&rdquo;, Michael enjoys participating in the education and development of aspiring artists.</p> <p class="p1"></p> <p class="p1">Michael conducts training at Siggraph, EUE, studios such as Neoscape and Blur, and at a collegiate level. Michael currently serves as the head of animation at Northeastern University in Boston MA.</p> <p></p> <p class="p1">Always on the cutting edge of technology, Michael works with many leading 3D developers doing UX design and training for products including #ANIMA, #V-Ray, Phoenix FD, Particle Flow, Thinking Particles, Ornatrix, Zookeeper, #3dsMax, and Character Animation Toolkit. His vast production experience on projects such as Spiderman 3, Nim&rsquo;s Island, Infinite Crisis, Grimm, and Super Girl keep him engaged in all nuances of production.</p>Thu, 12 Oct 2017 11:50:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/10/141434.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/10/anima-2--d2-vienna-conference-2017Business in Arch Viz. Vol. 7 - Budget/Expenses/Pricing (Part 2 of 2)Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/09/business-in-arch-viz-vol-7---budgetexpensespricing"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/09/140792.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><br /></a>Welcome to the seventh installment of our new&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">here</a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/ARX1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/ARX1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="472" /></a></p> <p>Image courtesy ArX Solutions<strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Do you have dedicated staff in charge of budgets, accounting, quoting? Do any of them have formal training, or was it all learned from experience?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Yes we have staff in charge of budgets, accounting, sales etc. Each one is a professional in their own area. They have a big background in the industry and we train them based on our long experience.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> Yes, Lina Garau, the Co-Founder of the company is an experienced accountant and she takes over the administrative part of the business (which bores me so much) so we have a nice kind of chemistry because we compliment ourselves. She&acute;s the genius in the shadow.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> No, this task is split between several members. They do not have formal training but this is something that we are going to change.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> Yes one person who is both our studio operations manager and internal producer. It&rsquo;s a combination of 2 official roles full of responsibilities which was taught on the job.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes we do. We have an account management, project management, and account management team. It was hard to implement at first but it has proved necessary in order to grow. They come from advertising, television, and film/ visual effects production. They are able to use some skills from their previous worlds but this is such a highly specific industry that they have had to learn about 80-90% on the job.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> We have an office manager who takes care of all these things. She has her background from booking bands for rock festivals which kind of is the same thing.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We have a select number of employees that are allowed to provide pricing. Experience is a big part of knowing how to price.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> &nbsp;We have an in house financial team, one half dedicated to investment/funding and the other half for back office financials. &nbsp;They are from outside the industry.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Yes, our Managing Director and Office Manager deal with budgeting and quoting, this was learnt from experience as well as online courses. We also employ a book-keeper who visits us monthly and also an accounting agency who offer advice on targets, quotations and accounting issues.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> We have a producer that works with our CG and partners to develop the quote. Our producers also handle the accounting and managing the budget. Our producers have background in the industry, but not formal training other than experience.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Yes we have. And it&acute;s both. Most of them are experienced but we also train them.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> Not yet. All the budgets, accounting quoting are still done by me and Evan. The tax accounting is an outsource company. All learned from experience.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Transparent House:</strong> We have a core senior team that handles all bidding, and a dedicated controller who handles the accounting. Our accountant has formal training, but our bidding team relies on its strong industry knowledge, largely learned from real-world experience dealing with hundreds of projects over several decades combined.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/PS1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/PS1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="419" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Public Square</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>For someone new in the industry, can you walk us through the process of setting up a company budget and using that to determine a minimum price in order to be profitable?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> In order to estimate the minimum price they can run a quick equation. It is not pretty, but for a non technical person this will work:</p> <p></p> <p>1- Put all your spending for at last the last three months, if you have information for more months, use it. Include everything there and be honest. The number is going to be a big cat bag. The coffee machine, your salary, the 3D Artist that is working with/for you, pizza delivery, taxes, rent, electricity, your accountant fee, the new internet provider, mobile phone, etc. &hellip;. put everything.&nbsp;</p> <p>2- Divide that total that you got by the number of months that you use to estimate all your spends. This will give you a very rough number but for the main purpose of this equation, we will call it, &ldquo;average monthly cost&rdquo;.</p> <p>3- Count how many artists you have on your team that are affected to direct production. Note that this is not all the employees who are working with/for you. It is only the artists who are working in production only. We will call it &ldquo;Total Production team&rdquo;.</p> <p>4- Divide the &ldquo;Average monthly cost &ldquo;by the &ldquo;Total Production Team&rdquo;. It will give you a number that will show you a rough cost estimation.&nbsp;</p> <p>5- Add an expected profit margin. Typically we suggest a minimum of 25% but based on our experience it should be in the range of 35 to 40%. Please note that this is not final net business profit. Things tend to go wrong, and when they do they can go really wrong.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> You always have to keep in mind your fixed costs and always leave headroom for unexpected issues (which always appear). Dealing with computers and geeky stuff is always expensive. Further than that the rest will be benefit. But you don't have to be greedy. Be good and do even better, the rest comes by itself.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> This is a huge topic&hellip; Whether it&rsquo;s a small or large company, it comes down to attempting to account for every expense possible prior to commencing operations. A useful exercise is to set up a personal budget: track every expense over the course of a few months to see where your personal finances go. It&rsquo;s eye opening and is exactly the kind of thing that one needs to do as an operator of a business. Once one knows where money is spent, one can control how it is spent and then determine operational requirements. Salaries will be the greatest expense. Don&rsquo;t forget to pay yourself.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> We use the artist&rsquo;s salaries and a multiplier, determined based on our overhead and our profit, across the number of days and artists we think the project will require. If we know we can&rsquo;t do the job with fewer artists and in less time we know we&rsquo;ll lose money and we can&rsquo;t take the project.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> This has happened very organic and unplanned for us. For the first couple years, profitability was not a concern at all. As we grew, we used last year&rsquo;s budgets as basis for new budgets. Since we don't have any investors, we can prioritize other aspects than maximum profitability.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> The easiest way is to figure out your billing rate based on all your overhead and then look at how many hours the project is going to take to get done.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> Depending on the outcomes (how much profit?) and circumstances (you have start up funding or not) of a start up, it will vary on how aggressive you can be to position yourself in a market. &nbsp;If you have cash to burn and you are focused on market share, there is a lower priority on profit margins, which means there is usually more of an emphasis on marketing/business development line items. &nbsp;If little to no investment (under capitalized), and are looking for a place at the table in a market, you usually see a focus on finding initial clients with repeat work and building out a profit margin over a longer period of time. &nbsp;Line items in this scenario can be heavier on resource and asset costs (people and equipment).&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Excel is great for this. Enter all your overheads, including your own salary! So many people may forget this or pay themselves minimum wage. When starting out obviously, this is the case, we didn&rsquo;t take a steady salary for around 8 months when we started the company. Once you have these you can use basic calculations to figure out your minimum pricing.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> I think the easiest mistake to make when putting together budgets is not taking into account the overhead above your team&rsquo;s time. We have to think about how much it takes to keep our doors open, rent, equipment, utilities, all these things need to be covered from the jobs we produce.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> It's not science rocket. Based on your experience you know what time you need for a special type of shot. X amount in modeling, Y texture, z light setup&hellip;etc. This multiplied by our hourly rates you get the most realistic price.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> I think first of all, the artist needs to think about the investment on machines, hiring artists, renting a space, hiring client management, project manager. You need to know all the costs and the job desk. At the very first start, definitely you cannot afford to pay all of that, but you can be the client management person, project manager, account manager at the same time for a temporary time. Just make sure you not eliminate those cost, just reduce it. Then when you grow, you can add all of those expense 100 percent on your price.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> Lets be honest in this point, it's not an easy way to build a company, there are a lot of points but the key one is the talent, how much you pay for other artist talent is the basic cost to deliver a product to the market, that the minimum price to build a company instead of being a solo professional.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/PURE1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/PURE1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="401" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: PURE</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Have there ever been cases where, in hindsight, you would make changes that would change the outcomes of budgets and pricing?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Yes, it happens all the time.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> Normally that doesn't happen in our company, as I said our administrative department is really analytic so everything is always in control.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> Yes naturally. Nine times out of ten they are creative decisions. But sometimes there is something more technical or underthought through that would affect the profit.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes I think we could include more administrative/ overhead time for more challenging projects. Our account managers spend a great deal of time with clients on more complex projects, this isn&rsquo;t always apparent at the start of a project.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> In general, animations are much more tolling on our employees than you would think. We have not once had enough time and budget to work with animations in a sustainable way.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Yes, probably on every project : &nbsp;)</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> Yes, I wish I would have recognized sooner that raising prices is not punishing my clients, but is a natural maturity in a business relationship. &nbsp;Be not afraid to ask for your true value in a business relationship. Confidence without being brash is a balance that one must learn over time.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Not any specific examples that we can think of. What&rsquo;s important to realise, is that if you progress your pricing and budget along with your skillsets and internal infrastructure then you&rsquo;re on the right path. Having a &pound;500 monthly IT budget is great when you&rsquo;re a freelancer, but if you start employing people, then that budget needs to increase and subsequently your pricing will also.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> I think with every project we learn more about the client and or how we would handle things differently with another client. Creative work is so hard to put real numbers too. You have to estimate the time it&rsquo;s gonna take your artists to the best of your knowledge and try and account for client revisions and package them into your numbers but each client and project is different, so there is always something to be learned on how to handle or budget the next one better.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> yes&hellip;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> hmm.... for me, no.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> sure, our behaviour is keeping changes out of our project path, addressing them to a different fees policy in a per-hour basis with a fixed profit.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> Yes, but in hindsight is too easy. I think the number one change that we would make is going back and starting with better communication. &nbsp;Better communication of the process the project will take and the scope of work. If you, or your client, don&rsquo;t understand the scope and how it&rsquo;s going to get done clearly, you are starting off on the wrong path to begin with.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/SB1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/SB1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="260" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Steelblue</p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>When you grow a company how do you manage overhead expenses. How do you calculate the risk associated with staff and expenses not directly tied to revenue?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> As explained before, we spread the cost of this staff in the 3D artists, so if we need somebody new for accounting, that impacts directly on our daily rate.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> As many other things is a matter of trial error. Nobody gets born with a degree on economics so you always try to use your brain and be conservative until a certain point. The rest is a bet so when you bet sometimes you win and sometimes you lose. If you are not excessively risky, everything stays OK.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> It&rsquo;s important to set goals for any growth addition, particularly with staff. Hiring staff should bring some level of increased productivity or revenue generation. Setting goals for staff additions and monitoring those goals is key to managing overhead. Efficiency is always a topic to be analyzed and monitored.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> Ourself this has been a long hard process of taking the plunge into extra layers of management, I.T, and infrastructure. We have taken these plunges when we have turned a huge profit on a job where we all &lsquo;mucked in&rsquo; and invested this into a new producer, or office manager or new server or new studio and so on. So they are calculated risks when the studio is healthy. We may have sacrificed personal development or working on more creative work during this time to ensure stability.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes we do track this very carefully. We started our company with no money so we are building on what we have. This means every expense is carefully examined for its profitability.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> We have always grown very slowly, in average one person per year. We calculate that it takes our new employees at least one year to fit in and generate income. Our main concern with bringing in new personalities in the office is that it can make spirit of the office unstable.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We have always grown organically and tend to shy away from too many overhead staff until we know we can keep them busy.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> Resource planning is the key for company growth. &nbsp;You can see the data trends if you are disciplined in keeping records, which will assist in you making a more informed decision on when and how to add on additional resources and increase your expenses.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> This is tricky and something we&rsquo;ve been dealing with more over the last year or so. We are moving into a larger office this year for example, we go on annual trips, weekly lunches, conferences, we have employees dedicated to art direction, office management. All those costs don&rsquo;t directly bring in revenue. What they do is strengthen your product and set you aside from the competition. Clients see and respect that and therefore you&rsquo;ll find yourself dealing with larger projects and bigger budgets. Therefore, we calculate our risk and factor in these costs when defining our pricing.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> It&rsquo;s very tricky. We scale slowly. We work with freelancers to fill in the extra needs when we are busy to supplement our team. Once the pace of the increased work is steady, we&rsquo;ll make a new hire.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> They all are going into the hourly rates which are the basis for the client calculation.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> It depends. If we screw up, my team had to work overtime on daily basis or even on weekend without getting paid. I always teach them to have the responsibility.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> Its a percent risk you decrease with volume and years of experience. We are always prepared for a 10% or more incoming projects and with flexible freelance to raise the capacity in high seasons.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> I won&rsquo;t go into how we calculate the added staff but I will give you a list of things one needs to consider when putting together their budget. The conversation on the CGA forums has occurred time and time again with responses along the lines of &ldquo;add A+B+C+D and divide by X&rdquo;. The formulas are usually lacking the detailed picture so perhaps this is of use to new companies starting to grow. &nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>Alarm/Security<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Advertising/Promotion &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Automobile Expense &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Bank Service Charges &nbsp; &nbsp;<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Business Licenses and Permits</p> <p>Cloud Service &nbsp;<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Conference and Network Events<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Dues and Subscriptions<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Education/Professional Development &nbsp; &nbsp;<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Employee Awards/Incentives &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Entertainment<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Hardware</p> <p>Insurance Expense&nbsp;</p> <p>Internet/Cable<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Janitor &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Office Supplies<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Payroll Expense &nbsp;</p> <p>Payroll Tax &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Postage and Delivery &nbsp; &nbsp;<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Printing and Reproduction &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Professional Fees - Legal/Consulting, Payroll Services, Tax Accountant</p> <p>Rental Expense - Equipment Rental, Office, Vehicle</p> <p>Repairs and Maintenance</p> <p>Small Tools &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>Salaries &amp; Wages</p> <p>Software</p> <p>&nbsp;Taxes (Property, City, etc)</p> <p>&nbsp;Travel Expense<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>&nbsp;Utilities &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/SB2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/SB2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="250" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Steelblue</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>How do you know how much you should be spending on IT infrastructure and machines as a percentage of revenue or overall income?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Don't really know, we tend to have a fixed yearly budget based on our expenses from previous years.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> It is something organic. The growth of our company have always been a geometric progression so if we have to invest in IT is because more people are coming to the office, so in the end the income will be higher. Sometimes it takes more time to glue but finally it compensates and starts giving more benefits.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> IT spending is all about identifying problems and analyzing potential solutions. Any time an IT solution can solve a problem that is causing person hours, one can analyze the potential savings vs the proposed expense and come to a reasonable conclusion. I&rsquo;ve learned that infrastructure is a gigantic compromise between what is ideal (super expensive) and what is practical (solves problems and is affordable). Sometimes there are very expensive solutions that solve a problem so well they are worth the expense.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> No % calculator exists for us. It&rsquo;s all based on foresight and an understanding that these things pay for themselves in the long run. I love the illustration of the 2 teams of workers, both pulling stone. One team is pulling at 100% a square stone, one team is slightly behind but carving a wheel. I think that's a good visual illustration of business in general. Stop, invest smartly, then continue more efficiently.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Whatever we have we spend when we absolutely need to. Unfortunately we are not at a point to allocate budgets to IT. If we need equipment or a new server we had to get it. In really tight times we would lease or finance.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> We don't know anything about this.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We take IT and software licensing very seriously. &nbsp;We run enterprise level on just about everything which gives our clients more confidence in working with us. &nbsp;The data is protected and we have the proper insurance in place. We don&rsquo;t really look at it this way as much as we used to. &nbsp;I have considered the efficiency of running two shifts as a way to get more mileage out of workstations and software licenses. &nbsp;Software costs are growing rapidly.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> We have a 25% line item annually on capital expenses, which includes IT infrastructure. We are high, but our clientele and business requires us to be in that range. &nbsp;You should match your IT expenses to who you are as a company. &nbsp;If you are doing Storage Warehouses off the Interstate, you should not have the need to have high IT expenses&hellip; but if you are doing high end work for high end clients, you cannot rely on low end IT. It's all a ratio of business type (Yugo : Commodore 64, Lexus : Quantum Computing)</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> We have an annual budget for aspects such as IT as we find that we purchase different equipment across the course of a year. That being said, we don&rsquo;t try to hit that budget and only purchase IT equipment as and when necessary.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> We don&rsquo;t have a rule or specific number.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Experience. We have good experiences with appr. 10-15% of the revenues.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> hmm.. I do not calculate it like that though. I buy when I need it, no matter what, but I know in business, the return of investment is for 4 years. That&rsquo;s all.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> As a percentage of revenue because it's a key to be profitable, if incomes are going down we have to keep our level of quality and technical improvements to stay on the market.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> It is an investment that should be weighed against all other expenses. &nbsp;What you invest there, you may not be able to invest in other places. We start with a budget based on percentage of revenue that has evolved over the years. &nbsp;We deviate from this on case by case often driven by if we feel the investment improves productivity and thus elevates the value add of every day of production.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/US1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol7/US1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="473" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Urban Simulations</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>What is the approx. percentage breakdown of expenses within the company? (Salary, consultants, insurance, office rent, payroll tax, hardware, software, materials/supplies, entertainment, marketing/advertising etc.)</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Salaries are by far the most expensive expense in our company, it sums up almost 80% of our spending.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> Ideally, salaries should take no more than 60% of overall expenses. If a company can be structured and operated around this salary level, the rest will fall into place. If salaries are more than 70%, other key items get left behind.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> 80% salary, the rest are an even split with hardware/ software probably taking the greatest chunk after that. We believe in a living wage for a big city. We also cover 100% healthcare for our employees.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Salary, Insurance, Rent, IT, Software off the top of my head.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Around 50% is spent on salaries / tax. 15% on hardware. 5% on software, 5% on rent, 15% on subcontractors and suppliers. 10% on entertainment / marketing etc.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> Salary and office rent are number one. We haven&rsquo;t invested in new hardware and software substantially since I have been here other than for VR, however I would say a good percentage goes to this when getting set up as more of an initial investment until it&rsquo;s time to upgrade systems.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Salaries are absolutely the biggest segment.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> 65% salaries / 4% consultants / 1% insurance / 8% office / 15% payroll taxes / 7% hard - soft</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Steelblue:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Salary: 55-60%</p> <p>SubConsult: 15-20% (this can be composed of actors, helicopter pilots, IT services, copywriting, voice over artist, makeup artist, electricians)</p> <p>Insurance ~8% (employees&rsquo; health insurance is the vast majority of this expense but also includes workers comp, liability insurance, etc)</p> <p>Rent: ~7%&nbsp;</p> <p>Payroll Tax: ~4%</p> <p>Everything else: ~6%</p> <p></p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Thu, 14 Sep 2017 20:38:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/09/140792.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/09/business-in-arch-viz-vol-7---budgetexpensespricingBusiness in Arch Viz. Vol. 6 - Budget/Expenses/Pricing (Part 1 of 2)Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/09/business-in-arch-viz-vol-6---budgetexpensespricing"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/09/140636.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><br /></a>Welcome to the sixth installment of our new&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">here</a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/BB.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/BB1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="370" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Beauty &amp; The Bit<br /><br /></p> <p></p> <p><strong>When determining pricing, how much is based on market forces vs carefully analyzing the business to ensure profitability?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> We try to measure each single project we do, we have real time tools to measure productivity, profit, etc. What can not be measured can't be improved.</p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> Normally we have standard budgets though they can vary depending on the requirements of the client. Profit is always relative to the place you live in, so we always ensure that it provides a nice income for our artists.</p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> Our pricing is mostly based on what our business needs to remain profitable. When market forces come into play (i.e., lower prices), we try to engage in value propositions and competitive services, not price wars.</p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> I&rsquo;d say 50-50. You make content in the time it takes to reach a certain quality bracket. That quality bracket within certain western markets is now known to cost a certain amount to produce so there is a relative standard. It also depends on what type of work you do. Luxury residential work commissioned through developers can often be commissioned on contract to deliver a wide range of material over a longer timespan. One off competition work direct with architects is often costed cheaper as it&rsquo;s a faster turn around.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> I&rsquo;d say 80-20 in terms of the price being determined by analysis. We pay a livable salary to all our artists in a big expensive city (los Angeles). We need to add a basic mark-up on their salaries to cover expenses and keep the company functional. This to a large extent determines our pricing. We are obviously aware of competitors pricings but more and more our pricing is a function of a growing company who knows how long it takes to do the work we need to do and the costs involved. Our margins are extremely tight but we feel confident that we are doing the best we can for our clients.</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> This is a very organic and almost spiritual process, where gut feeling, market, the wind, the vibe in the office and what not it taken into account. Our accountant once told us to be careful about upping our prices too much, because lowering them is a sign of failing.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We always want to know what it really takes to do a job properly. &nbsp;We do price based on our workload. &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> It is always a balance to take market rates and move above them with value added services in order to increase profitability. &nbsp;Which is why each contract is unique in pricing, schedule and deliverables.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> When we started out, our pricing was heavily influenced by market force and rightly so. At the end of the day we were are asking clients to take a risk on us, as we had a limited portfolio, a lack of independent experience and a small team. As we are making our way up to around 13/14 employees this year things have changed. We know what our overheads are and our longer-term costs which we depreciate and spread out over the number of artists we have. With this information, we&rsquo;ve formulated an excel sheet which calculates our bottom line reflected by the number of employees we have and their salaries. This allows us to see what we need to charge to remain profitable and reach our quarterly targets.</p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> A little bit of both. We&rsquo;ve found that due to many companies outsourcing services to other countries, that overall prices have gone down, because of this, it&rsquo;s sometimes difficult for clients to understand a company that is charging more even if the work is superior.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Hard question. All the years we calculated the prices that we need to have to work properly. But the market got rougher and it's sometimes hard to stay to the prices that you need to survive.</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong>&nbsp;This is interesting question. Well for me it's easier to be honest, the Indonesian local market price is not that good. So obviously I will not try to offer my service for local market. &nbsp;So I can focus on analyzing the business to ensure profitability. But it doesn't mean it is an easy thing to do. The myth "outsource to asia is low cost" is real. The struggle is real too.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Transparent House:</strong> Our pricing approach generally focuses on profitability analysis. As a result, we usually do not work off of price sheets, but custom price most of our bids to account for more immediate market factors such as local and overseas labor costs, specific project complexity, scalability, and changing overhead as our company expands.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> 75% is based to ensure profits and sustainability. The market forces us to ensure our human resources, marketing actions and global structure is on the standard</p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> Primarily analyzing the business.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/kilograph.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/kilograph-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Kilograph</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Have you ever gone into a project knowing you would not be profitable? If so, why?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Yes, several times, but we did it for some very strategical project/client in which we particularly wanted to get the account (when entering a new market, a landmark project, etc).</p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> For sure. We sometimes embark in projects that are not so profitable moneywise, but may provide stunning visuals&hellip;well, why the hell? we lower down our cache.</p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> Yes, for a variety of reasons: relationships, portfolio pieces and/or budget trade-offs with other projects.</p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> Yes several times. Mostly through investing in portfolio or taking risks to jump the standard of work the studio undertakes. We also do a lot of our own IP which distinguishes us from other studios.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes much to the dismay of the people running the finances &nbsp;I want to do projects for the love of the building design, the cause (non profits such as Medicins Sans Frontiers or Drop in the Bucket Foundation), or just the fun of using some new techniques. &nbsp;Also, if I know a project is going to be fun for the artists we will do it.</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> We are not that concerned with profitability on a micro-level. We are concerned with making enough money overall per month. We don't even know how you would count a project as profitable. The most profitable projects are the ones that makes your staff happy. We are happy as long as we don't go broke.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Selling new services is almost always an investment you need to make.</p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> Yes, we have taken on a few projects in order to position our company for being noticed for very specific events. &nbsp;US Government Trade Missions, Sales Opportunities for Municipal Governments and for development of business development opportunities. &nbsp;We usually put this cost as a business development or public relations line item.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Yes on a few occasions. When we started, we did it to get our name out there. Recently we have only ever done this with a strong chance of the work leading to either more profitable work later down the line, or as a favour to clients who have treated us well over the years and didn&rsquo;t necessarily have the budget to commission high quality visualisations, for a competition entry for example.</p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> We&rsquo;ve gone into projects knowing that our profit margins would be minimal if we think the job would be worthwhile for our portfolio and/or the project looks like it could lead to more work.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong>&nbsp;No. If we know it in front we don't do it. But life is sometimes not working this way. We got projects that started great and turned into a nightmare. And the other way around. That is one of the biggest challenges at the moment: The possibility to plan a project got more difficult.</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong>&nbsp;Yes. obviously, like everyone else I guess. It is for the portfolio and how you can run your company in full capacity. But somehow, we still manage some profit. I don't think we can calculate the profit based on one project, but we need to see the overall output.</p> <p><strong>Transparent House:</strong> Absolutely. There are a number of projects we have taken on with no profit or even negative profit and the reasons vary. In some cases, the client is championing a cause that we agree with. Perhaps they are a non-profit and need help with marketing or visualization. In other cases, we take on certain projects as loss-leaders with the goal of becoming an approved vendor with a company that may be able to offer us much more long-term future work. And of course, friends and family always get a discount!</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong>&nbsp;No, even with the promise of a key client for futures projects.</p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> We have. There are strategic projects or clients and competitions that we want to be involved with that are not about the short term compensation.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/FF.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/FF-sm.jpg" width="630" height="302" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy: Factory Fifteen</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>When you first started how did you determine pricing for projects vs. now?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Based on knowing all our fixed and variables cost plus a markup.</p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> I started this company alone in my little room at home. I would do images for really low price. I was starting and I wanted to win a little plot in this business. I guess is like when you have a band and you start making gigs&hellip;at the beginning you play in any joint, once you get a better label you promote yourself and start playing at better clubs with better conditions. After all, doing images for architects is not so different from playing in a band.</p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> Initially, pricing was a guess based on past experience and knowing some clients&rsquo; tolerances. Now it is much more systematic. Interestingly, the two are not that far off!</p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> When you first start out your overheads should be low and there is less management in the team, so you can technically turn a profit on a much lower gross. It&rsquo;s a balance. You are not known to the world so you need to stand out and price is a factor, but if you are so cheap clients also are concerned that you are not a serious player and want a guarantee of quality. As you grow you realise.</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> We had no overhead and no expenses other than babyfood and rent. I set prices based on what people would pay me.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> One of our clients complained that we were to cheap compared to the quality of our product. It was a shock to us! They told us we had to triple the price!!! When they paid the invoice we felt like we were robbing them and had a big celebration dance in the office. Looking back at this, in the beginning, we actually financed our clients visualisations with our student loans. It is easy to forget that computers, electricity, offices and food cost money. Our prices are depending a lot on how the society is moving. In Norway, our abundance of oil has given us great financial stability, but it is also an expensive society to live in.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Gut feeling is how we priced at the beginning. &nbsp;Usually we bid way too low. &nbsp;Now we take our time if possible and try to figure out the actual effort.</p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> In the beginning, pricing was market rates only&hellip; just get the work in. &nbsp;Today, we have value priced ourselves and have been profitable. &nbsp;Many repeat clients make the value pricing work.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> When we started, it was based on market forces and what we felt we were worth. Now it&rsquo;s based on those factors as well as our overheads and targets.</p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> Pricing has always been a flat rate depending on the amount of revisions and specifics of the project. We agree to a scope and then deal with overages as they pop up.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Today we analyze much more clearly if things can work out as planned.</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> hahaha, back then when I was starting to work as a freelancer, I only thought 500 USD could get me a good life in Indonesia. I already had two i7 workstation back then, and low end monitor. And as any other freelancer, i use pirated software. the only genuine license I got back then was vray 2.0. After several years working with that price, I got &nbsp;quite decent of money. But humans are never satisfied. When you have money, you want to get time freedom as well. So you need to start to think about investment in workstations, renderfarms, networks, offices, hiring artists, buying licenses, overhead cost, saving on bank, holiday expense for the artists, gathering expense for the artists. So definitely 500 USD is not enough.</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> 25 years ago it was not market standards, no references, no anything, then we moved into a 200% profit over costs.</p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> How we determined cost then and now are similar. &nbsp;The pricing is largely different now but the method is mostly the same. There is the popular answer to the question on how much to charge which is 'As much as you can get.&rsquo; That said, when we review a project we look at the time that will go into it, our overhead, any intellectual property investment and try to price it according to those factors.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/MIR.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/MIR-sm.jpg" width="630" height="323" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy MIR</p> <p><br /><br /></p> <p><strong>With very large scope projects can you walk us through your process. How do you ensure you remain profitable and don&rsquo;t run over on your budget? Are you always profitable or have there been unforeseen circumstances that affected profitability?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Because our industry works on a fixed budget it very difficult to charge on an hourly rate. For big projects we use our background to quote properly and we define in advance all deliverables and time-frame in order to minimize the risk of getting a loss. I wish it was that easy to always meet the goals.</p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> Honestly 90% of our production is competitions so that forces you normally to short processes. On the other hand I hate long processes. What I love of my job is that this week we are with a stadium, next week with a library and the next one with a museum. I &nbsp;love short processes for their freshness. When we do long projects we tend to fall on boredom and that is a bad ally for creativity.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> Large projects are all about breaking things down into manageable pieces, right from the quoting stage. It is key to have solid project management that keeps an eye on the overall process and staging. We track time and compare to budget on a regular basis, as well as keeping track of milestones and checking client-supplied information. There are always unforeseen circumstances. We have learned to plan for those so that they are allowed to happen and not swallow up budget in a huge way. We also provide clauses in contracts that attempt to protect from crazy changes or circumstances.</p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> Hard to answer this one. I guess it starts with the delivery deadline and working back from there in terms of man days. You cost things based on a predicted number of man days to achieve the client's scope. It&rsquo;s only through experience of running large jobs that you know how many artists will be needed. It&rsquo;s only through experience that you know how much a 2-3 day shoot will cost if you do things properly. It&rsquo;s also through experience that you know what is achievable on a 3 man guerilla shoot vs a huge film crew. If you don&rsquo;t have the experience. Ask people who do. On very large projects we tend to always turn the biggest profits as we have a efficient team and good directors who understand the technical and shooting process. We also have a very good pre-production method where we try to decide as much of the creative things as possible before the shoot and even create final assets during this phase. Then post shoot, we are all in automation mode.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> We use pretty complex management software now called workamajig. This allows us to closely track artist&rsquo;s hours, monitor change orders and any additional expenses on a project together with changing schedules. The larger the project the longer it will run and the more small errors (and late nights) can impact profit in a negative way. We also have an account management team who makes sure the clients are communicated to in a regular and strategic way. This makes for fewer unnecessary changes and keeps everyone happy and moving forward. Also management helps the artistic teams to understand the goals of our clients as they relate to the project keeping the product on brief and successful.</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> We have arranged our business in such a way that our clients books slots. We know already months before starting a project how much money the work will generate.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Haha - nobody is ALWAYS profitable on a job. &nbsp;There are too many factors to control. &nbsp;We recently switched over to budgeting all jobs in google sheets. &nbsp;We work up labor numbers based on deliverables and then tally up known direct expenses. &nbsp;We have been applying a 15% management fee to our labor which covers the Project Management Team time and creative lead. &nbsp;We will have department heads review the pricing prior to sending the proposal to the client.</p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> Through the process of large projects (long schedules), we have remained profitable due to resource planning and tight project controls. &nbsp;If we see a project slipping in the critical path scheduling, we use the &ldquo;float&rdquo; to cover the slip. &nbsp;If that does work, we minimize the resources until an alignment occurs (like the client paying us on time or catching up on payments). &nbsp;In other words, no money, no honey. &nbsp;We write this into our contracts that as long as payment milestones are met, the project continues with proper personnel. &nbsp;If payments slip, we take people off the project which directly effects the next deliverable. &nbsp;This way it is up to the client if they do not want the deliverables on time (which they always do), then they must follow the schedule and the contract terms.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Large scale projects are treated in the same way as we do any other project, except for milestone payments. Regardless we would charge a 30% deposit and ensure that our clients know when they can expect WIPs / deliverables, when they need to send their comments by and the consequences of delivering comments late / outside of the agreed scope. This allows us to stay on track and not overrun budget.</p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> Larger projects tend to be the most profitable since there is an economy of scale for the client and for us. For example, if a client wants a flythrough, we can pull renderings from the flythrough for less work than a stand alone rendering.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> First we try to setup a reasonable price for the scope. Then we create tasks and define the estimated hours for each task. These tasks are time tracked with a tool. The main unknown component is the client. This can be in the end the key factor if a project is successful or not</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong>&nbsp;Well, I always inform all the terms and conditions to my client before I work with them. Everything outside the scope and terms and conditions will have additional charge. For example, if the client wants us to do the 3rd revision, if its major changes, I will send them additional cost. Or if it's in the middle of the project they want us to model some building that supposed to use a photo at the very beginning, we will ask for an additional fee. And of course additional timing. <br /><br />The main problem most of the time is the client will try not to pay the additional costs, and try to scare us by telling us this is going to hurt the relationship, and they might not send another job to us. Most of the time it is just a bluff. Although the possibility to happen is still 50 -50. Most people are afraid when the client starting to say that, but the problem is, they might not be back to you anyway so why be afraid? If you say yes to their threat, what happens on the next project from the same client? &nbsp;They already see an opportunity to squeeze you again and again because you give them room to do so.</p> <p>The other problem is they always ask us to work 24 hours like we don't need to rest. They don't care if you are asleep or not, so you need to care about your self and your team. Obviously if it cant be done, then it cant be done. If they insist, we usually drop the job no matter what. My team is more important than anything. Yes we need money, but I can find another client who can respect us as a human being. This is what makes the company not profitable, because I always have to pay for crazy overtime without getting paid.</p> <p>The other profit that cannot be seen with our bare eyes and even on paper, if you keep asking your artist to work like crazy just to get money and make your client happy, you are not making your artist as part of the team, no matter how you want to tell me. The artist is part of the company, they are assets, we need to treat them well as we treat ourself. If we keep asking them work like crazy, they will quit, and you will need to find another artist to replace them.</p> <p>The biggest question is, can the new artist produce imagery as good as previous artist? If they can produce good images, &nbsp;can they follow your company rendering style? Is &nbsp;consistency with your images? Every good artist need to adapt with the company they work with, its obvious, they also human as everyone of us. The time for this adaptation will cost us money, this can be calculate as lost of money.</p> <p>Some people will pay the artist a very high salary, but at the end of the day, its not just about the salary, but about the environment. And the last but not least, its about you as the leader in the company.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Transparent House:</strong> Pricing is not a perfect science, especially on larger projects. We do our best to conduct a thorough discovery during the bidding process to identify preferred workflows and potential pitfalls. We then break the project into manageable phases, which are further broken down into individual tasks per phase, which, with the input from our department heads, we can price more accurately.</p> <p>Often we will then apply a volume pricing model once we identify efficiencies, which may reduce the price per item or phase by a certain percentage. We factor in our preferred markup, and viola! Of course, there are times when the amount of information coming from a client, for example, is limited, or the parameters change during critical points during project execution. To counter these situations, we &nbsp;protect ourselves with strong change control language in our contracts.</p> <p>To maintain stronger client relationships, we prefer not to underbid and then charge lots of overages, but we have employed change control on numerous occasions when appropriate and to great success, both in maintaining profitability and the relationship with the client. Clients are always more comfortable when everything is on the table up front and it&rsquo;s easier to manage expectations when the parameters of each project are clear.</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong>&nbsp;Always we have a well defined scope of the work that leads the time we have to work, cost and therefore is everything tied, but as usually everything moves in unexpected way due to a project changes in the last week or something we address all the additional work in additional costs for the client.</p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> Every project is predictable&hellip; &nbsp;Predictable in that there will be unforeseen circumstances. We are not always profitable on a per project basis. If the scope of work is not properly defined or not understood, this leaves room for error and affect profitability. Incorrectly estimating the effort and not identifying risk have an effect. &nbsp;Not tracking profitability throughout the project, something we are guilty of, will sneak up on you. You can&rsquo;t leave that towards the end.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/PF.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol6/PF-sm.jpg" width="630" height="445" /></a></p> <p>Image Courtesy PixelFlakes</p> <p></p> <p><strong>How do you track the hours per project and per employee?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Arx Solutions:</strong> Our time units are based on half day, so one day is two full units. We track the time for each person in ArX Solutions. We know exactly how many units we spent in a project two years ago. We use it also to keep track of a client's record, so if we detect a complicated client, we might charge them with higher fees.</p> <p><strong>Beauty &amp; The Bit:</strong> We ensure that at the end of the month each of our artists have a nice amount of money in the bank.</p> <p><strong>Designstor:</strong> We use an online system called Harvest for tracking time for all employees.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Factory Fifteen:</strong> We have a project based profit calculator on google sheets which our producer inputs man days and additional costs in during the lifetime of the project.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes we do both per project and per employee. We have blended rates for certain services and try to keep everyone on an 8-hour day.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> Our employees have a fixed work week of 37,5 hours, in which they have to make one image.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We track using a tool called Mavenlink. &nbsp;We break it down by project:deliverable:phases and put in estimates at the project start and then track against our estimates. &nbsp;Every employee fills out a timesheet..ideally every day.</p> <p><strong>Paul Doherty / The Digit Group:</strong> &nbsp;We use on online tracking system. &nbsp;We know how long projects should take and if an employee or contractor is taking advantage, we can quickly remedy the situation.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> We use Asana as our main scheduling tool. This is a great free scrum based platform where we split our daily tasks out per image, per artist. At the end of each day comments / timings are recorded.</p> <p><strong>Public Square:</strong> We usually track on days and half days worked. Hours are difficult if you have to pull in freelancers for bigger projects.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Monitored by a tool.</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong>&nbsp;To be honest with you, I dont know how to track this, because there are to many variable can be happen. What happens if the client send the feedback two weeks after we send them draft 1? how would you calculate this?</p> <p><strong>Transparent House:</strong> We use project tracking software to log hours and generate spreadsheets to analyze efficiencies per quarter or after individual projects close out.</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong>&nbsp;After trying tons of software to track, we tested and prove as had to maintain most of the solutions in the market&hellip; I shouldn't name them but are basically everything but Google&hellip; we have written a script that identifies every employee google calendar tracking by the name of the project, tasks and counting it to know how we are over the budget.</p> <p><strong>Steelblue:</strong> We use Forecast to estimate and Harvest to track.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p></p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Fri, 08 Sep 2017 01:05:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/09/140636.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/09/business-in-arch-viz-vol-6---budgetexpensespricingBreaking News: Chaos Group Acquires Render LegionJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/breaking-news--chaos-group-acquires-render-legion"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140266.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p class="p1"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_09/webnews_corona.jpg" width="630" height="425" /></p> <p class="p1">For months there have been rumours circling that some big things were happening in the industry, and while many of us insiders had been speculating what some of those plays would be, I don&rsquo;t think any of us saw this one coming.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>That&rsquo;s right, as the title says, Chaos Group has just acquired Render Legion, the makers of the now quite popular renderer Corona. <span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">For the last 12-18 months there have been many in our industry, both newcomers and long term studios alike, that have been experimenting with or switching entirely from V-Ray to Corona.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>A <a href="/2016/11/2016-architectural-visualization-rendering-engine-survey---results" target="_blank">survey</a> we conducted late last year confirmed this, so in many respects it makes a lot of sense that Chaos Group would be interested in making this acquisition.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Capturing that market share solidifies their position in the industry and allows them to continue to reach all the verticals that they currently service.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span><br /> <br /> In speaking with Lon Grohs, Chief Creative Officer at Chaos Group, and Vlado Koylazov, Chief Technical Officer, this acquisition means that each company no longer needs to be reactionary to the other and<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;together they are much stronger.&nbsp;</span>Although Chaos Group could have developed a simpler product, that could address the needs that attract users to Corona, it made more sense to acquire Render Legion.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>This now allows them to focus on larger issues that will propel the company forward, rather than re-inventing the wheel.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Chaos Group recognizes they are competing against much larger companies, like Autodesk, and their efforts are better spent trying to look much further into the future.</p> <p class="p1">As with any acquisition there will be many questions that will arise and speculation about the future of both V-Ray and Corona. The history of acquisitions in our industry will likely be cause for concern.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Both Lon and Vlado have said, there is really nothing they can say that will change this perception and only time will prove their true intent.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>That intent they say is to keep and develop both products. Each products is being developed with a different philosophy and target, so it makes sense to expand their portfolio to address this need. &nbsp;They have no plans to stop development of either product.</p> <p class="p1">In a press releases posted by both Chaos Group and<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Render Legion, they have done their best to answer some of the questions, but there is still a lot that I don&rsquo;t think we will learn until more time passes. <span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1">We have learned that the team developing Corona will remain in the Czech Republic and continue development as they have been, but will now have significantly more capital and resources at their disposal to take Corona where they believe it should go.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>There will also be a sharing of technology between the two products to make both products better.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>The next version of DMC sampler will be in Corona 1.7 and they are already optimizing V-Ray&rsquo;s dome light with the help of the Render Legion team.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>Pricing, packages, distribution for both products for the immediate future will also remain the same. So for all intents nothing changes other than who owns and supports the Corona product.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp; </span>And of course an accelerated development of the Corona product.</p> <p class="p2">Render Legion spoke about their search for partners and capital to speed up their growth, and had multiple offers from VCs (Venture Capitalists), but only the offer from Chaos Group made sense, as they have the industry and product expertise. And of course their resources don&rsquo;t come with the often very restrictive conditions that would be typical of a VC investment.</p> <p class="p1">The official announcement was made at this year&rsquo;s <a href="http://vienna.d2conferences.com" target="_blank">D2 Conference</a> and tomorrow there will be a 1 hour Q&amp;A with both Vlado and Ondřej, so please post your questions below and I&rsquo;ll be sure they are addressed during the Q&amp;A and do a follow up article once I return from the event next week.</p> <p class="p1">Exciting times ahead in our industry from what looks to be one of the more exciting&nbsp; <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG/> <o:PixelsPerInch>96</o:PixelsPerInch> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:DoNotShowRevisions/> <w:DoNotPrintRevisions/> <w:DoNotShowMarkup/> <w:DoNotShowComments/> 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SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal Indent"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="header"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footer"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="caption"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of figures"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope address"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope return"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="line number"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="page number"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of authorities"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="macro"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toa heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Closing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Signature"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Default Paragraph Font"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text Indent"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Continue 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Message Header"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Salutation"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Date"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text First Indent"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text First Indent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text Indent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Body Text Indent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Block Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Hyperlink"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="FollowedHyperlink"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Document Map"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Plain Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="E-mail Signature"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Top of Form"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Bottom of Form"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal (Web)"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Acronym"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Address"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Cite"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Code"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Definition"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Keyboard"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Preformatted"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Sample"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Typewriter"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="HTML Variable"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal Table"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation subject"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="No List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Outline List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Outline List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Outline List 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Simple 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Simple 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Simple 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Classic 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Colorful 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Colorful 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Colorful 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Columns 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 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UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Grid 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table List 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 3D effects 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 3D effects 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table 3D effects 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Contemporary"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Elegant"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Professional"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Subtle 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Subtle 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Web 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Web 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Web 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Balloon Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" Name="Table Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Table Theme"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 7"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 8"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Note Level 9"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" Name="Placeholder Text"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" Name="Revision"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" QFormat="true" Name="Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Quote"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" Name="Light Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" Name="Light List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" Name="Light Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" Name="Dark List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" Name="Colorful List Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Bibliography"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="41" Name="Plain Table 1"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="42" Name="Plain Table 2"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="43" Name="Plain Table 3"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="44" Name="Plain Table 4"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="45" Name="Plain Table 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="40" Name="Grid Table Light"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="Grid Table 1 Light"/> 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Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 5"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="46" Name="List Table 1 Light Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="47" Name="List Table 2 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="48" Name="List Table 3 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="49" Name="List Table 4 Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="50" Name="List Table 5 Dark Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="51" Name="List Table 6 Colorful Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="52" Name="List Table 7 Colorful Accent 6"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Mention"/> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Smart Hyperlink"/> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} </style> <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--><span style="font-size: 11.0pt; font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif; mso-ascii-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-theme-font: minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;">acquisitions&nbsp;</span><!--EndFragment-->&nbsp;in our industry in a very long time.</p> <p class="p1"></p> <p class="p1">Chaos Group <a href="https://www.chaosgroup.com/news/render-legion-and-corona-join-chaos-group-family" target="_blank">Press Release</a></p> <p class="p1">Render Legion <a href="https://corona-renderer.com/blog/new-horizons-plans-for-2017-and-beyond/" target="_blank">Press Release</a></p>Fri, 25 Aug 2017 07:25:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140266.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/breaking-news--chaos-group-acquires-render-legionBusiness in Arch Viz. Vol. 5 - Business StrategyJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/business-in-arch-viz-vol-5---business-strategy"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140160.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><br /></a>Welcome to the fifth installment of our new&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">here</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>When you started the business did you have a well established business plan, or was it done guerilla style?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> When we started is was something organic. We didn't plan it but as soon as we started to grow, we put one in place.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> It was never done guerrilla style from day one. Lina has always taken good care of this and has always drawn a good financial plan. The only difference is that when time passes, benefits are higher because you are a more reputed company so your rates can be higher than years ago.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:</strong> Total guerilla!&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> guerilla 100%</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> Our business was built around the desire to just do everything differently. It has proven a very effective and fun approach. But there is no plan at all, just to be stubborn and try to kick ass.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We had a business plan but our approach was a lot more guerilla style. &nbsp;For us this was over 20 years ago when the business of visualization and 3D filmmaking was just starting to take hold and the technology and software were changing rapidly. &nbsp;We didn&rsquo;t have good models to build off of or to study so we just figured it out as we went.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> When we first started Pixelflakes there were so many unknowns, both from a personal standpoint and a financial one. We did have a business plan which we used as a guide, rough direction, of where we wanted to be rather than anything too elaborate. We used our gut and logic however to tweak this as we went along, adapting it as different challenges arose. There were far too many variables on Day 1, a lot of unforeseen issues which due to a lack of experience were unpredictable. As time went by this business plan was embellished and firmed up, eventually resulting in the yearly targets that we still use today.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Business what? I used excel sheets..and later on my accountant said that I did a business plan..which I was not aware of. There I realized that it's actually quite easy if you stick to your common sense.</p> <p><strong>2G Studio</strong>: guerilla style. When I started the business I didn&rsquo;t know anything about this industry, all I knew was if &nbsp;could do 10 images in a month I can live happily.</p> <p><strong>Anonymous:</strong> Decent business plan on start.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> Guerrilla, actually I think that after 5 years i didn't realize i was actually owning a company. I was just playing and enjoying a hobby of doing the most realistic work I was able to do</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>How often do you review the direction of the company and pivot or develop new areas of the company?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> Twice a year we have a partners meeting that we focus only in the business. Traditionally it is two/three full business days.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> Day by day. We have a spirit of always evolving, so inevitably that drives us to use our brain to look for better solutions in all areas of what we do. That doesn&acute;t mean to be crazy and go from left to right on a daytime basis. It means to be consistent but at the same time do things better and search different ways to be the same company but in version 2.0.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:&nbsp;</strong>I feel like I&rsquo;m always reviewing the direction. New developments take time and happen maybe yearly or bi-yearly.</p> <p><strong>Kilogaph:</strong> I&rsquo;d say every 10-12 months we develop a new area of the company. In terms of the overall direction we have been experiencing a slower shift from pure architectural rendering to more comprehensive marketing. The advent of VR has really accelerated this part of our business in a way we haven&rsquo;t experienced before.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> This is a constant effort. We are probably more concerned with what we are doing and how we are doing it than what is healthy. This is what keeps us interested in running the business. It is like drag racing; you have to tweak stuff all the time to make sure that your next run is faster. And from that work comes some key realizations, like that you have to ditch the old combustion engine and invest in jet propulsion.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Every few years we re-work our business plan to set direction for the company. &nbsp;Business plans tend to provide benchmarks with with to measure yourself as opposed to a recipe for success. &nbsp;We find that committing our ideas to paper are often enough to make them happen.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> We discuss internal matters on a weekly Monday morning meeting. We hold strategic finance meetings quarterly with our accountants and discuss other important information between Partners and Associates as and when required. These meetings allow us to review current output and pivot if required however, thus far, we have managed to develop new branches of the business based off business plans rather than as a response to market trends. Attempting to produce a unique product rather than something we feel other companies are already doing very well.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Every month!</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> Twice a year, just to check if we are still on track.</p> <p><strong>Anonymous:</strong> Regularly question, significantly review every couple of years.</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> Once a month, I did it once a year but since we are involved in new technologies we need to be more responsive</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What specific things do you look at in the industry, or internally that help you craft the direction your company takes?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> &nbsp;Always client's feedback and industry trends.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> Quality. We are always hyper worried about quality and the product&acute;s finesse. You can craft shoes all your life in an artisan way, no mass production, but if you are the best shoemaker you'll never run out of jobs.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:</strong> We try to filter out hype and concentrate on needs and potential. I listen a lot to my staff and we have taken their advice on a number of directions. I also listen to trusted clients and some peers that I have in the industry.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> We track our proposals every month and where new business if coming from. We also track our win/loss closely and this helps us to understand how we are doing in the market and what factors might be affecting the numbers (competition, interest in specific services).&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> Since we want to do things differently, we keep track of what is produced in general in the market to see what to avoid. Our key business philosophy of doing it differently has also become our philosophy when making images: &laquo;But how is it different?&raquo;</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We are always trying to balance the type of work we want to be doing with the work that we perform best on. &nbsp;We look at technology trends, real estate trends, experiential trends etc to gauge direction.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> We often look at the approaches from other companies just to see how the market is progressing and to establish some references in our minds, such as the imagery they produce or the social media presence they have. We look and have workshops before and after projects with our clients that dictate the approach we take on what we do. They also sometimes even push us into new directions as we try new approaches or techniques which could complement certain projects well.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Are we profitable? Are we doing a good job? Do I like what I do?</p> <p><strong>Anonymous:</strong> We look more to client needs than to what is visible in the industry. Something to keep in mind, what you see in the industry may not be what is largely being produced. Much of our work we strategically kept confidential. Imagine you don't know what the industry is doing, what would you do and how would you service your clients? &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> What everybody is doing to avoid going in the same path. If 30 companies are good in still renderings 75% made in photoshop, please, don't become the 31th, just look for your own way</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Tell us about your first office space and when you made the decision to &ldquo;move up&rdquo;. What factors affect your decisions to move into new space?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> We were overcrowded and we really needed it.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> Our first office space was my little home studio years ago but for healthy-living reasons that didn't last long. We rented a small space (6 people) in front of my house literally and in one year time we moved to a bigger office 5 minutes walking from my home. It is our current office and it tripled the old office size so I guess right now we are really happy with it. The main reason obviously was that the old office was getting too little for our growth.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:</strong> Our first office space was a shoebox in a converted industrial warehouse in downtown Toronto. It had loads of charm, but little sound proofing and some whacky tenants. Our downstairs neighbour was an artist that used hot wax as his medium. During the day we were constantly overwhelmed by the smell of hot wax and by his terrible habit of putting CD&rsquo;s on repeat for the entire day, often while he wasn&rsquo;t there. Those factors and the need for more space made us move.</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Our very first office was our kitchen table. The second office was about 450 sf and had no windows. &nbsp;We expanded from 3 to 6 people in this space and it was getting tight. I was pregnant with my son and we had no child care so I needed a space where I could work through the pregnancy and have him in the office with me in a comfortable way. We rented a big rambling house in los feliz around this time and cleared out the lower level and basement for the office. I lived upstairs. This worked pretty well for about 2 years. &nbsp;When we hit 10 employees we moved to our current space on Wilshire blvd. This was about 3 years ago and we have progressively been expanding and improving the space ever since. I hope we&rsquo;ll be here for a while because we&rsquo;re all pretty tired of moving!</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> Our first office was 4x2 meters. We sat back to back and worked day and night. Since then we have had a bunch of offices, but never really invested in a proper office with good enough ventilation. Perhaps it is time to move on now?</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Our first office space was a shared space in Cambridge, MA. &nbsp;Kind of like a WeWork from 1995 - without the cool factor. &nbsp;We started with about 250sf, 2 computers and 2 phones for the three of us. &nbsp;Rod and Nils used the computers and I used the phone. &nbsp;At night I would hop on a computer to make our &ldquo;marketing&rdquo; materials. &nbsp;Fortunately the space provided us ample room to grow as there were only a handful of tenants in the space. &nbsp;When one of them moved out we would usually take over their space. &nbsp;Eventually we had the whole floor and the next decision was where to relocate. &nbsp;We chose to move to Boston.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Our first &lsquo;office space&rsquo; was a small spare bedroom at Matthew Reid&rsquo;s (Founding Partner) family house in Essex. Marvin commuted here monthly from Amsterdam, Holland, staying for weeks at a time. We made the move to find an actual office when we started earning enough money. We knew that being in London itself is a huge draw for architectural practices looking to collaborate as being able to go around for meetings at short notice is an integral part of building relationships and understanding projects in their initial stages. Not only that but as we looked to expand we knew that attracting talented artists would be key in the growth of the company and to do this a London postcode made it much more realistic. In a sense, moving into London and our first office was the main priority of the company, as soon as enough income was secured, before we even began taking a salary.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> We started quite small and moved just into new spaces when we really needed them.</p> <p>2G Studio: Our first office space was 3x3 sqm. so small. as my own room. Then we added some new artists, and we moved to the living room, bigger space. 3x5 sqm. haahhaa. Then we finally moved to Bali, and used my whole garage. Once evan's house was finished, we connected both garages (evan's house is next to mine). We don't have any more room at the moment, and we still building our new office. Yes the 2GS office, a 4 storey building and a rooftop. The main factor is we need space for our artists and render farm as well, and we do need entertainment area for our artists. so they can play ping pong, enjo the ocean views, can play PS4, xbox, BBQ.</p> <p><strong>Anonymous:</strong> My apartment?&nbsp;</p> <p>We chose WeWork as a place to grow. &nbsp;We could start with a 3 person office and then move within the same floor plate as we added team members. &nbsp;We move to a 4 person, 5 person, 6 person space before moving to our own space that could accommodate a dozen. We moved again a couple of years later to accommodate a larger team. The biggest factor was size. We stayed in similar style architecture, in the same neighborhood with a similar amount of space per person.&nbsp;</p> <p>We had power consumption issues at each of the 3 office spaces noted.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> I think everybody started in their own home, but when you realize you are working like a Jedi&hellip; and i mean in housecoat, it's time to move to an office.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>What are some of the things you learned over the years moving between different spaces?</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> Is better to move to a space that has more space than the one that you really need. Every time that you move your business is complicated so this is a major thing. Don't go into an space that you will need to replace if you need to hire someone else.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> Our office has always been a home, literally. It has always been located in a regular house, not in a business park so it helps outstand the fact that our company acts like a little family.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:</strong> I&rsquo;ve just moved to a third office and I&rsquo;ve learned the following:</p> <p>Open offices sound like a great idea but they don&rsquo;t work. People need privacy;<br />Quality electrical power is the single most important thing;<br />The character of your office can have a huge impact on clients;<br />Moving sucks;<br />Moving is expensive;<br />Location matters;<br />Office space can be inspirational to staff, which is a great thing;</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Ikea desks have a 3-year lifespan.</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> If done properly, moving can be a manifestation of motion or direction; which employees find inspirational. &nbsp;If done poorly, moving can be seen as us making things harder for our employees. It's just a space, but where are we going with it?</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> Having a space that is designed based on how you work is really important. &nbsp;Having flexibility to grow and try new things is also critical.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Location is key. Whilst an office is designed to work, you need to be based in a creative area that offers employees amenities to be able to enjoy what it is they do. Having great pubs and restaurants on the doorstep as well as a huge park (for the little sun England has to offer) allows us to hangout after work and during Friday lunch pub visits, which is of course a great perk. Alongside that being accessible for clients and employees alike is a must, (no one wants to commute for hours) so remaining in areas where creatives dwell, in our case East London, is a smart choice. Finally, on a more practical note, as we move into larger spaces, having additional meeting rooms for employees and clients alike can&rsquo;t be taken for granted.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Don't fall in love with the spaces :-) And don't think too big!</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> Bigger space is needed to ensure the artists are not easily stressed.</p> <p><strong>Anonymous:</strong> Team layout matters. Efficient space planning may not be the best for team working. &nbsp;When rent rates are $70 a square foot, you tend to want to be very efficient but this may not be the best strategy to foster the right culture.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> If only 10% of the clients visit your office, then just focused in have the office you will love, not the office your clients want to go.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Does your office space support your business strategy? (culture, teamwork, meetings etc.)</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> We encourage team work all the time. We try to create a team that feels as part of something bigger.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> Absolutely, for the reasons mentioned.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:</strong> Yes!</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes it does support the team structure with clustered desk arrangements in a large open space. We also have plenty of comfortable breakout areas where artists can discuss work in more casual ways. Central to the office is a large comfortable client area where we showcase new technologies, brochure designs, sometimes project videos. &nbsp;The best part of the office is having a large deck and lots of natural light. It&rsquo;s California after all!</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> Yes. Our office is an integral part of everything we are.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We just moved into new space in Boston this month and our NY studio relocated about 2 years ago. Both spaces were tailor made for the way that we work and to promote our culture. &nbsp;It's always a fine line between having the right amount of space for now and options for growth without having to overpay for too much space.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Yes, we are moving into a new office this summer which has been specifically chosen for this purpose. It is important to cultivate teamwork and culture, as it directly affects the quality of imagery. It is also important to think about how your office reflects your company image to clients that visit or new team members that join. We actively work on this and set aside budget for items such as interior design, break out spaces, coffee machines, office entertainment etc.</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Yes&hellip;Except the ZEN corner. I am the only one who is there, taking a nap&hellip;</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> At the moment, not really, but somehow we manage to do it. But in the new office, we definitely can.</p> <p><strong>Anonymous:</strong> More or less, but needs tweaks. Different teams around the world have different challenges. Cost of office space in San Francisco could be unique to some other companies.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> Yes, and a huge terrace for barbacues, that's a key point.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Do you do internal peer reviews and how is that process handled? Who reviews you? (your peers, partners, employees)</strong></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ArX Solutions:</strong> We do annual reviews to the staff and give them feedback.</p> <p><strong>Beauty and The Bit:</strong> We have a management office that help us evaluate that because it is always important to have external input about this, but the main thought comes from us always. Lina and I have long meetings reviewing all of this.</p> <p><strong>DesignStor:</strong> Yes, peer reviews are done by managers and partner. I don&rsquo;t think I&rsquo;ve had a review in years! It&rsquo;s about time...</p> <p><strong>Kilograph:</strong> Yes every Monday we have a creative review where we go through the past week&rsquo;s work and provide critique. We also have structured employee reviews every quarter. We always use the same format for these so people can understand their progress in a straightforward way.</p> <p><strong>MIR:</strong> Yes. The partners interview all staff twice a year. One midterm review that is only about creative development and personal issues, and one at the end of year where we discuss salary and review and critique.</p> <p><strong>Neoscape:</strong> We do yearly reviews with at least quarterly check-ins with employees. &nbsp;Managers and team leads take care of their teams and the owners review Principals. &nbsp;We also welcome feedback from employees about the management team. &nbsp;One thing that I always advise my teams on is having a close relationship with their team so that goals and objectives are talked about all the time and if any issues crop up there should be an immediate way to discuss and resolve it. &nbsp;Yearly reviews only work well if you keep your finger on the pulse of how your team is performing and how engaged they are.</p> <p><strong>PixelFlakes:</strong> Every three months we review our employees. This is done with the founding partners and the employee in question. We set goals, discuss any issues and revisit what&rsquo;s been raised in previous reviews. What once started as yearly reviews progressed into quarterly reviews in order for artists and employers alike to raise concerns and to ensure that any minor or major issues do not escalate into something bigger over time.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PURE:</strong> Yes, once a year. We do it together.</p> <p><strong>2G Studio:</strong> Yes, the senior artist will give score to their own team, and then bring it to the meeting to make some discussion what we can do better on the next week. Then the PM &amp; the founder will score the senior artist. and we always have a monthly meeting with our client to review things. and what we can do better on the next project.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Urban Simulations:</strong> Its public the performance you are doing and project supervisors only reports to the art director and executive producer, peer are just improving reviewing not as a stage.</p> <p></p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Mon, 21 Aug 2017 08:26:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140160.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/business-in-arch-viz-vol-5---business-strategyNEC MultiSync EX341R Display ReviewJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/nec-multisync-ex341r-display-review"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140003.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>By: Corey Beaulieu (Neoscape)</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/NECEX341R/NEC1.jpg" width="630" height="568" /></p> <p>Over the past month I have had the chance to review the <a href="http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/ex341r-bk" target="_blank">NEC MultiSync EX341R</a>, (1800mm radius) curved monitor. I was excited for the opportunity as my typical workflow includes a 34-inch curved monitor from Dell and I wanted to see how the two compared. As this model is from the EX class, &ldquo;E&rdquo; for Enterprise and &ldquo;X&rdquo; for Specialty Series, it may not have been designed for the visualisation world, but overall the monitor performed very well in my testing and proved to be very competitive as a daily driver.</p> <p>The <a href="http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/ex341r-bk" target="_blank">NEC EX341R</a> is a feature rich display designed to create an immersive environment for any user. It incorporates the DisplayPort 1.2 and NEC ControlSync technologies allowing it to be daisy-chained with a second monitor and controlled through a single settings panel. While this display did not arrive with a calibrator, I used the Xrite i1 Display Pro to create a color profile and was amazed at both the overall contrast ratio and out-of-the-box calibration achieved by this SVA panel by Samsung.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/NECEX341R/NEC4.jpg" width="630" height="1194" /></p> <p>If you are unfamiliar with the SVA panel type as I was, it is designed to be a high contrast, higher than average maximum brightness level, with both better viewing angles and better color representation than an IPS panel type. Refresh rates can be slower than other panels, but as I was not attempting any high speed footage review or gaming applications, I was unphased by the 59hz refresh rates.&nbsp;</p> <p>Other features to note before delving into the pros and cons are: the Human Sensor, Ambient Brightness Sensor, Monitor controlled KVM features, and Picture in Picture modes. This last feature that I am compelled to mention, but admittedly am out of my depth in describing is the TUV Rheinland rating for flicker-free quality and the display meeting the low blue light standard.&nbsp;</p> <p>Now, with much of the facts behind us, on to the subjective&hellip;.</p> <p>Out of the very well designed shipping box, this monitor was ready to go within seconds of cutting the tape. My work being largely defined by its color representation, my first move was to calibrate the color using my i1 Display Pro (highly recommend) and while this SVA panel type can handle higher than average brightness, I lean towards lower brightness for better print matching. Here, however, the 3000:1 contrast ratio was highly effective in reinstating that range of color that is very sensitive to our industry.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/NECEX341R/NEC2.jpg" width="630" height="389" /></p> <p>My initial excitement in testing this display was in comparing it to my curved Dell and so my next steps were to settle in to the ordinary of the monitor. How do I feel about the more extreme curve? How is the angle of viewing? What superficial details am I noticing in my first few minutes of use?</p> <p>Answers: I could not be more in love with the matte finish display. Our studio has 8 or more feet of windows along one side and the glare created is tremendously distracting. This matte screen not only solves this issue, it also gives me that feeling of a more true representation as overly glossy displays can have that spit-shine quality normally seen on a used car lot. The additional radius to the display is meant to enhance the immersive experience, but I have to admit, I don&rsquo;t care for it much. While it didn&rsquo;t jump out at me at every moment of use, I have never liked the more subtle radius of my Dell so the tighter curve was only more distracting. It distorts my image verticals in a way that I find distracting and if given the choice I think I&rsquo;d rather do without-- not the end of the world. And finally, the viewing angle, while not an issue at first as I sit pretty flush with my monitor, I did notice while reviewing work with colleagues that the less perpendicular I was to the screen center the less contrast and color accuracy I could see and in our business this is a real draw back. We often paint by committee when balancing an image set for final color and it can be hard to discuss with a group when not all parties see the image in the same way.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/NECEX341R/NEC3.jpg" /></p> <p>Since my last review, I have become a major fan of the human sensor and the ambient light sensor. Why are these features not ubiquitous across all displays? They offer a maximum in privacy within an office environment and the ambient light sensor makes sure your eyes receive a consistent level of brightness throughout the day which makes long hours all the more comfortable. One note on the Human Sensor is that I must move around in my chair too much, getting closer and farther away at random and the sensor gets tripped up by my chair when I walk away. The distance I use to sense my personal presence seems to be too far and if I don&rsquo;t turn my chair as I leave, the monitor doesn&rsquo;t always know I have stepped away.&nbsp;</p> <p>The KVM feature and the Picture-in-Picture feature both intrigued me greatly at first, but I soon realized that these features were not for my normal workflow. I think that this was my shortcoming as any monitor that can save you the extra hardware and allow you to maximize your reach, say you run both a Mac and a PC or a Surface and a Workstation, is the greatest thing ever invented. I realized through my trial that my needs were more simple and my tendency was more towards using Remote Desktop to gain access to a machine in our render farm rather than access a more local machine. I think these features, however, would prove extremely useful in a much smaller, at-home farm setup where you may only have a machine or two extra for rendering.&nbsp;</p> <p>About two days ago the time had come. I had to pack my <a href="http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/ex341r-bk" target="_blank">NEC EX341R</a> up back in the box and reconnect my Dell. It was at this point that I noticed the most interesting difference of all. While both monitors produce the same or at least an extremely comparable number of pixels, and both are curved, when I re-connected my Dell display I had a sudden feeling of having switch from HD back to SD. There was a very noticeable soft blur to the image I was seeing and a sort of glowy spill from one pixel to the next. Thankfully my eyes have made the adjustment on short order, but in that moment I realized how much of a difference there was in the 2 options.&nbsp;</p> <p>At only $200 of separation between the $799 Dell and the $999 NEC display I can easily say that if you have the money, the NEC display is well worth your extra cash. These are not the same quality though on the surface they may seem comparable. NEC, for the second time has far exceeded my expectations in testing and they are clearly listening to an audience larger than the rest. The features provided by NEC are not what I would have gone in search of, but once they were made available to me I saw their usefulness in a way that has me questioning other brands.&nbsp;</p>Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:21:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140003.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/nec-multisync-ex341r-display-reviewHow Physically Based Materials are Transforming Arch VizJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/physically-based-materials-are-transforming-arch-viz"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140001.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>On my way to SIGGRAPH 2017 this year in Los Angeles I had the opportunity to attend the second annual <a href="https://www.allegorithmic.com/substancedays/2017/hollywood" target="_blank">Substance Days</a>&nbsp;hosted on the <a href="https://www.gnomon.edu/" target="_blank">Gnomon School</a>&nbsp;campus.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.allegorithmic.com/" target="_blank">Substance</a> for those who are not yet using it, is the industry standard for PBR (Physically Based Rendering) material authoring. &nbsp;Allegorithmic, the creators of Substance, have been around since 2003 and are in 95%+ of all AAA games. &nbsp;But like many things in the games and VFX industry often find their way to the world of arch viz. Substance is no exception. &nbsp;<br /><br /><iframe width="630" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X5Y-WiR2WrU?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Spending a great deal of my time each year attending events around the world, I&rsquo;ve had the opportunity to see Scott DeWoody, Firmwide Creative Media Manager at Gensler, speak about a number of always interesting subjects. &nbsp;One of his favourites however is Substance. &nbsp;In fact, he&rsquo;s sort of become the unofficial spokesman for Substance in architecture because he loves it so much. I can&rsquo;t recall a recent trip where it has not come up at least once in conversation. &nbsp;But it&rsquo;s not without merit. Substance is a pretty impressive application that should be on the radar of anyone doing architectural visualization.&nbsp;</p> <p>Substance Days is a three day event featuring masterclasses, keynotes and talks by some of the top Substance users from around the world. &nbsp;What impressed me the most was the ability of some of these artists to create the impressive textures they do. &nbsp;If your current texture pipeline, like many, revolves around photographs, scans and Photoshop, your first exposure to Substance might seem daunting, as it really does require a completely different thought process. &nbsp;While much of the work is done in a node graph similar to many shader pipelines, &nbsp;the way you build procedural materials requires that you look at materials around you like puzzles that need to be solved. And as a result some of these node trees can get pretty intense.</p> <p>The line up of <a href="https://www.allegorithmic.com/substance-days-2017-hollywood" target="_blank">speakers</a>&nbsp;this year was impressive to say the least, but I had a chance to ask Scott a few questions about his presentation this year. He provided insight into their current pipeline and detailed the work they recently completed on the new NVIDIA headquarters.&nbsp;<br /><br /><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NPMful-VoXA?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Q. How important is the portability of substance materials between various applications in your pipeline vs creating the procedural materials themselves?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is an extremely important feature to us at Gensler. We use a wide range of tools in our design process, and we like to visualize in all of them. If we can make a material one time, and port it everywhere, we have saved a lot of time. And with the advent of real-time, it&rsquo;s super easy to just take the Substance file right into Unity or Unreal. But the ability to make these materials procedural is almost as important. The nature of how Substance builds materials allows Designers to generate an infinite amount of variation, deformation, and colors for their work. This allows materials, such as marble, to easily be made once and changed with just a few clicks! Anyone who has been doing visualization a while knows how hard it is to remove the repetition of materials, and Substance can help greatly with this process.</p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/Allegorithmic-SubstanceDay-Slides_Review-3.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/Allegorithmic-SubstanceDay-Slides_Review-3-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a>Gensler PBR Material Workflow</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/Allegorithmic-SubstanceDay-Slides_Review-3.jpg" target="_blank"><br /></a></p> <p><strong>Q. What initially drew you to using Substance materials?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>What really caught my eye with Substance was the ability to create anything without using as single photograph/image as a base. Not that I am saying that you cannot, or should not do this. The new <a href="https://www.allegorithmic.com/blog/your-smartphone-material-scanner" target="_blank">photogrammetry tools</a> are case-in-point, but being able to generate a fully customizable material from scratch is powerful. With Substance, I&rsquo;m able to make changes in real-time, and have it update across all the material outputs almost instantly. That is better than any image editing workflow for materials. Once Substance, and the gaming industry, started to adopt PBR (Physically Based Rendering) techniques into their pipe-line, it was game over. In Arch Viz, we&rsquo;ve been doing PBR for more than a decade now, we just called it Rendering. So, I knew there had to be a way to use Substance in Arch Viz when I saw this happening. I jumped in and never looked back.</p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/20170720_184443.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/20170720_184443-sm.jpg" width="630" height="840" /></a></p> <p>In house photogrametry set up at Gensler using Substance Designer</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Q. How much time do you generally spend to create a material?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>That&rsquo;s a tricky question, as some materials can prove more challenging than others. I remember when I first started, I was spending a few hours on each material. But I put that up to both learning and experimenting while I was making them. Substance is an easy application to fall down a rabbit-hole in, and get lost in experimentation. Even to this day I&rsquo;m still finding new uses for certain nodes that I thought I knew how to use. It&rsquo;s amazing to watch other Substance Artists work, because everyone uses it differently. Now I feel like I can create a decent looking material in anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. This is an application where practice plays a big role, but the payoff is rewarding once you get going in it. It&rsquo;s totally worth getting lost in Substance when you first pick it up.</p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="474" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Q. Have you switched your entire material pipeline in Gensler to substance?&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>For the most part, yes! I have all our core Visualization Artists up and running on Substance now. And they&rsquo;re using it for the same reasons that I gave in my presentation at Substance Days. It&rsquo;s allowing them to take small samples of materials, and generate something that looks unique for a rendering or real-time. As for some of our designers who are rendering, they&rsquo;re still a little intimidated by it. However, I do a lot of internal training around Substance. So, everyone is warming up to it. But there is no doubt that they all see the power and potential behind it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Q. Breaking down an architectural material into a procedural material requires a very different thought process, how difficult is it make this switch? &nbsp;How much time do you spend just trying to figure out how to break down an actual physical material sample to figure out how you&rsquo;ll actually create it?</strong></p> <p>The biggest switch for me in this process was thinking more with &ldquo;Nodes&rdquo; or &ldquo;Visual Programming&rdquo;. I&rsquo;ve always been pretty straight forward in my workflows, so adjusting to something parametric was challenging. People who are already used to thinking like this shouldn&rsquo;t have much of a problem diving into Substance. Breaking down a material becomes relatively simple once you realize you&rsquo;re just making shapes and patterns. Starting with this mindset makes the process of breaking down a material easier. Always start with the big shapes and patterns. Once these are generated look at how to blend them all together to get the overall texture you&rsquo;re looking to make. Then start adding detail from large to small. And always work in greyscale, just like you would with illustrations, painting, and photography. If you can read the material well in greyscale, it will look amazing once color is added in. The process overall is not much different than anything else we do in art, which is where all of this really shines.</p> <p></p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance3.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance3-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Q. For someone looking to try out Substance where do they start? &nbsp;Allegorithmic has several applications, which all fit into different parts of the pipeline. &nbsp;What are some good learning resources to get up to speed on created pristine architectural materials?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I would say it used to be challenging to find a place to start with learning around Substance, but now there is so much information out there around it. A lot of it is aimed at the gaming industry, in terms of the content being generated during the tutorials. But all the basics and workflows are the exact same. We might just ignore adding lava, fire, grime, but then again maybe not! It might be good to interject some training specific to ArchViz&hellip; perhaps I&rsquo;ll do that next! But in the meantime, the team over at Allegorithmic has done a fantastic job with their training on <a href="https://tutorials.allegorithmic.com/" target="_blank">Substance Academy</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Allegorithmic" target="_blank">YouTube</a>. Wes McDermott, Integrations Product Manager at Allegorithmic, does a fantastic job breaking down all the different applications, tools and workflows around all the Substance applications. From there I would move onto look at artists such as Joshua Lynch, Rogelio Olguin, Kyle Horwood, Mark Foreman, and everyone else who was at Substance Days. I&rsquo;ve enjoyed learning from these artists, and so many more. As I said earlier, there&rsquo;s always something someone else does that I never thought to do. So, I&rsquo;m constantly still learning these applications.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance5.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance5-sm.jpg" width="630" height="247" /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance6.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance6-sm.jpg" width="630" height="172" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Q. &nbsp;You recently wrapped work on a several year project working on the renderings and lighting and material simulations for NVIDIA&rsquo;s new headquarters. How integral was the work you did in the design process?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>My role for helping with the visualization during the design process was incredibly critical to the success of that project. So much so, that Gensler temporarily relocated myself to San Francisco for two years. They needed me on hand to work directly with the designers and the engineers over at NVIDIA. Mainly because we were using <a href="http://www.nvidia.ca/object/nvidia-iray.html" target="_blank">NVIDIA&rsquo;s Iray</a> technology for the first time, and this was the first major use-case for Iray. The CEO of NVIDIA wanted to &ldquo;simulate&rdquo;, not render, the new building we were designing. His logic was if he could simulate his GPUs before ever building them, why can we not do the same to a building? So, my priority was to establish a pipeline between our design process and their version of Iray, which was stand-alone at the time. Once that process was set up, I moved into doing simulations of the building. We set up every light with IES files supplied from our lighting consultant, Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design, and we also had material&rsquo;s BRDFs scanned from the physical samples. This enabled us to test lighting and material designs that ended up looking extremely accurate, due to how Iray calculated everything. On top of this, we were rendering on their GPUs. But not just the three GPUs in my local workstation, but a cluster of GPUs that lived at NVIDIA&rsquo;s HQ in Santa Clara. At one point I had about 250+ GPUs at my disposal to render with. This eventually became the <a href="http://www.nvidia.ca/object/vca-for-iray.html" target="_blank">NVIDIA Iray VCA</a> technology.</p> <p></p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA3.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA3-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA4.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance-NVIDIA4-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Q: What&rsquo;s it like to have access to a million dollar GPU cluster to iterate design decisions in real-time? &nbsp;How did that impact the process and could you have done it without that much horse power?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>All of this allowed myself to do an extreme number of iterations on the design. And I&rsquo;m not even exaggerate this. I spent an entire 2 months just doing variation after variation of lighting designs for the open workspace. We were trying to avoid just hanging linear lighting pendants from the ceiling. So we had to have rendered every option that came into mind. Some of them were just awful, but we needed to know if it would work. Eventually we ended up at linear lighting pendants, but we could confidently say that these in fact looked the best. &nbsp;At one point the lead Principal, Hao Ko, and I were just playing around with paint colors because we could. We had exhausted the design options for that week, and he wanted to see what happened if we turned the paint black. So, in about 15 seconds we had a good idea of what that looked like. And then we did it in every color we could think of after. Too see this level of accuracy and realism, in that amount of time, really opens some possibilities. Some possibilities are probably good, and perhaps some could be bad. But I can say for certainty that the simulation renderings we did are looking darn close to the completed project. It was surreal walking through the building near the end of its construction, and seeing how spot on everything looked.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Q. You guys started with scanned materials on this NVIDIA project. &nbsp;With the announcement of <a href="http://www.xrite.com/about-us/news-events/press-releases/allegorithmic-substance-designer-supports-axf" target="_blank">AxF material support in Substance</a> with the guys over at XRITE, how big of a deal is this? &nbsp;Is this something that will have a massive impact on our industry?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I think this kind of technology is going to have a major impact on our industry. To know that a material is going to look and behave as it does in the real-world when we hit render is extremely powerful for a Visualization Artist and Designer. I cannot tell you how many painful hours I have spent tweaking materials with a Design Director over my shoulder. I&rsquo;m sure we&rsquo;ve all been there once or twice before. If not, just you wait! But to be able to confidently say in a rendering &ldquo;It really is that color, and it really does reflect that way.&rdquo; This is exactly what people are looking for. Designers want renderings to look as they should, although what they expect can always be a wild card. Which is another reason why having a physically accurate material in a rendering is important. It really shows everyone how designs will look, and not an artistic representation of how the design will look. These are two greatly different views, and it was the whole point of the simulation process on the NVIDIA project. It did take some time for the designers to get used to the level of realism Iray was producing, kind of like we couldn&rsquo;t trust the computer. But after doing a few proof experiments, everyone was on board with it. &nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance4.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/substance4-sm.jpg" width="630" height="181" /></a>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Q. When you look at some of the substance material node graphs Gensler created for NVDIA, they are insanely complex. &nbsp;Would this process have been much easier with the AxF format and a material scanner?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>That I&rsquo;m not entirely sure of. I know the Substances generated by the NVIDIA team for the project were a combination of Substance and Scanned Data. I sadly haven&rsquo;t had a chance to really use the <a href="http://www.xrite.com/categories/appearance/total-appearance-capture-ecosystem" target="_blank">X-Rite Scanner</a>&hellip; I couldn&rsquo;t get it into my budget this year. Maybe next year! Regardless Substance Graphs can become complex, but I feel that&rsquo;s the case with any visual programming application. I&rsquo;ve seen some Grasshopper scripts that will probably blow your mind, such as the one we did for the Shanghai Tower curtain wall. Now THAT was a script. But what I really like about the AxF Format is that it can be combined with Substance. So, we can have the best of both worlds now. We can physically scan a material, and then generate procedural effects on top of it. Or we can throw the diffuse right out the window, and use the scanned BRDF data on a completely different Diffuse look for the material. The latter is extremely important for materials such as wood, marble, or anything that has a serious need for additional tiling information. Because a 4&rdquo; sample isn&rsquo;t going to cover 5,000 square feet by itself! And this was the process that NVIDIA took when generating the MDLs for the NVIDIA project.</p> <p></p> <p><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NG0CIqwPzcs?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p>Watch the webinar below that Scott Dewoody presented in early this year with more detailed information about their PBR and Substance workflows.&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KVFWzQEaj74?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><br />Want to read more about how Substance has been used in Architecture? With this <a href="https://www.allegorithmic.com/blog/obvioos-immersive-experiences-real-time-archviz" target="_blank">user story</a>&nbsp;, Allegorithmic spoke to Christophe Robert, co-founder of Obvioos, who accepted the challenge to use the real-time technologies coming from game industry and apply them to architecture over a wide range of projects from apartments to offices.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/5_Obvioos_FrenchAppartement.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_08/SubstanceDays2017/5_Obvioos_FrenchAppartement-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:01:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/08/140001.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/08/physically-based-materials-are-transforming-arch-vizBusiness in Arch Viz. Vol. 4 - ContractsJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/business-in-arch-viz-vol-4---contracts"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138903.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><br /></a>Welcome to the fourth installment of our new&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">here</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <h1>CONTRACTS</h1> <p><span style="font-size: 1.5em;">by Matthew Bannister (<a href="http://www.dbox.com/" target="_blank">DBOX</a>) / <a href="https://www.instagram.com/dboxcreative/" target="_blank">@dboxcreative</a></span></p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol4/DBOX_website_432casestudy_CGI_buildingdetail-sm.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></p> <div>image courtesy DBOX (<a href="https://www.instagram.com/dboxcreative/" target="_blank">@dboxcreative</a>) / <a href="http://www.dbox.com/" target="_blank">dbox.com</a>&nbsp;(432 Park Avenue)<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div></div> <div></div> <div><strong>When you first started, did you use a contract? &nbsp;Were they basic or properly drafted legal documents?</strong></div> <p></p> <p>Our first couple of &lsquo;dialog box&rsquo; projects back in 1996 were with my Princeton graduate thesis professor Liz Diller, so those were done on a handshake. &nbsp;If only the next twenty years could have been that simple. &nbsp;We did quickly form our own contract and I do have a copy of it in my drawer. &nbsp;I take it out every now and then when I need a good laugh. It wasn&rsquo;t a properly drafted legal doc but I was fortunate to start DBOX with a couple of very sharp cookies and together we quickly figured out what we should be including in the document. &nbsp;We tried to write it and make it sound all lawyerly and complex. &nbsp;Just hilarious.&nbsp;</p> <p>In the beginning with we were not overly concerned with the number of reviews in the rendering process. &nbsp;Our mindset was based on deadlines, and the idea that you would make best efforts towards a deadline and just like school, you would get done&hellip;for better or worse. For presentation imagery, that hasn&rsquo;t changed much as long as a drop dead, deadline is defined. We then had two disastrous jobs that changed our somewhat &nbsp;freeform approach forever. One project had a deadline that just kept being pushed back and that is where the &lsquo;best efforts&rsquo; goes out the window. &nbsp;The client while being a lovely chap (who we shall refer to as XYZ) was the fussiest human being on planet earth. &nbsp;We spent about a month discussing refracted light on the specs of dust in the road, that&rsquo;s when we weren&rsquo;t discussing whether the grout lines were all accurate to the 1/64&rdquo;. &nbsp;We have an internal award in his name&hellip;..so when a new client starts to get that way we christen them with the XYZ award.</p> <p>Another was a competition that had a hard deadline, where printed boards needed to be on a specific flight. &nbsp;The client changed the design too late and we tried to accommodate, when we should have been pointing to a contract and saying &lsquo;NO WAY&rsquo;. &nbsp;It was as hairy as it gets. &nbsp;When the client wasn&rsquo;t busy moving the goal posts, he was screaming down the phone about suing us if we missed the deadline. One DBOXr passed out from stress as the final disks got stuck in traffic. Of course our internet went out on the day. This was all back in &lsquo;97. &nbsp;Contracts got a serious review after these two wars&hellip;.and hard deadlines or design changes that would affect hard deadlines became important clauses to be addressed. &nbsp;In the case of design presentation, and planning work these two clauses are more important than the number of reviews. &nbsp;This is a &lsquo;time is not of the essence&rsquo; clause. We shall get back to that later.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Given how specialized our industry is, how hard is it to draft a document that speaks to the nuances of this field? &nbsp;Is it hard to work with lawyers to establish the terms?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>We were rather fortunate in that we got ourselves into some legal hot water in 2003 by unintentionally leaking an image to the press on a project that couldn&rsquo;t possibly have a bigger front page day. Gulp. What we were attempting to do was to ensure we got credit. &nbsp;It backfired and Reuters released the images before the public release. A friend of mine who runs a Wall St firm quickly introduced us to a very seasoned NYC lawyer that was way our of our league and he jumped in, got us out of handcuffs and put out the fire. &nbsp;He took a liking to us as we were unlike any other firm (or perhaps people) he had represented before and he crafted up a contract that one can still trace clauses to today. &nbsp;While this seems like a longwinded story, the key here is CREDIT. &nbsp;We instinctively knew early on that we needed to ensure that we received credit for our work and in order to do that one needs to maintain copyright. &nbsp;As a side note, if you get credit for your work, you will find that your work does all the marketing for you. &nbsp;In DBOX&rsquo;s 20 year career we have been involved in three projects that got massive long term press coverage. &nbsp;This keeps the phone ringing every day of the week. &nbsp;When the economy slows down, the phone has to keep ringing and ringing.</p> <p>The main reason we transformed from a purely CGI studio to a full service Brand Creation Agency, is to control our work. Make sure our credit gets printed. &nbsp;We once had a Sales and Marketing &lsquo;Guru&rsquo; exchange our credit for his on the way to press. While that is a war story for another day, it did make us even more vigilant. &nbsp;I have seen some incredible visualization firms work with branding companies and receive zero credit. &nbsp;You get to the back of the property brochure that is filled with full page spreads of CGI work and all you see is the Graphic Design Agency credit. I have even some share visualization credit with the &lsquo;Graphic Design&rsquo; Agency. How much input could they have had to share a CGI credit? Would a photographer do that with a creative director? &nbsp;I think it&rsquo;s perhaps understandable if one CGI company is subcontracting some work to another, at least then it is likely that an expert in the field is managing a directing the process from a CGI lens as well as the client. &nbsp;It&rsquo;s also understandable is if one CGI company is working as part of another&rsquo;s team for a specific project. &nbsp;Some companies work this way to staff projects. In that case the credit is probably not extended. &nbsp;The important point here is make sure you have credit stipulated in your contract so it makes sense and is fair. &nbsp;If you agree to have no credit in the contract, then at least you know what to expect later on when everyone else is celebrating how great &lsquo;their work&rsquo; looks.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Do you normally provide the contacts or do your clients? If they do, how do you resolve whose contract to use?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>We always provide the contract. &nbsp;Certain architecture firms have tried to enforce their contract and terms on us and we have either turned down the work or done the work without a contract. This is very rare, but in some cases it is better to perform a project without a contract than to sign one that could cause all sorts of issues with liability and ownership based on a client&rsquo;s onerous wording. Firms have said they will not work with us if we don&rsquo;t sign their contract. &nbsp;It doesn&rsquo;t tend to work out that way. &nbsp;If you are professional and produce consistent quality work, the firms will find a way to get you on a project when they need you regardless of contractual requirements. &nbsp;It is rarely the legal people at the firm who are the people that want and need you in the first place.</p> <p>For full service branding and marketing accounts (DBOX is a brand strategy, design, digital and film studio as well as CGI studio) we sometimes have to muscle through a contract provided by a client. &nbsp;This is rare and sometimes we choose to not do the project rather than move forward. The stakes are higher as it involves about a dozen services on a project that lasts years. Negotiating a contract takes a lot of time and energy and in the end our attorneys make sure that the key clauses from our contract end up in the client&rsquo;s contract we have been forced to use. Some contracts take several months to resolve. The problem with the client enforcing their contract is that they are nearly always too broad and are written with contractors as the subject. &nbsp;My advice is to not let time pressure the process. &nbsp;Again, I stress, that moving forward with a client&rsquo;s contract is very rare for us. Be careful with liability. Don&rsquo;t sign language that was designed for a firm that has a significantly different job or financial stake in the game.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>How detailed do you get with your agreements and what sort of items do you include beyond the standard boilerplate?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>I don&rsquo;t know what the standard boilerplate is for our profession and because I haven&rsquo;t seen other firms contracts it&rsquo;s unclear whether ours is detailed or not. &nbsp;The best contract is actually a very concise one that only focuses on issues that actually matter. Our &lsquo;rendering&rsquo; contract is about two and a half pages. An overly detailed contract could work as a serious dead weight over time. &nbsp;All the time spent discussing things that don&rsquo;t matter can add up.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Do you ever have to enforce a contract? &nbsp;If you do, is it already past the point of no return, or can it be done amicably? &nbsp;Has a client ever had to enforce a contract with you?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>Very rarely. We have never had any legal issues over the production of a project. &nbsp;The key here is that the person at your client&rsquo;s office that handles the contract is never the person you execute the work with. &nbsp;With this in mind it is important for a project lead on your side to spend half an hour going over the contract with the project point (on their side) so that they understand the rules of engagement. &nbsp;This is something that is so easily forgot. I need to remind our team often of this. &nbsp;The problem lies in feeling responsible to rush forwards. Don&rsquo;t. Get things organized first and always get a down payment. Anywhere from 50-75%. You need this for cash flow, especially if you are moving a good percentage of your resources onto a project.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>To those who don&rsquo;t use contracts to solidify deals in the industry, what advice would you give to them?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>For them to please consider whether they are actually contributing to the forward trajectory of our business and industry. At the end of the day we are all better off using contracts, perhaps even the same contract. &nbsp;I don&rsquo;t say this to level the field, but to potentially save the field. &nbsp;If architects became accustomed to one contract it would become a fast formality. &nbsp;The same can be said for developers with marketing image contracts.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Can you hire any lawyer who specializes in contracts or did it take time to find one that understand our industry?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>We have a lawyer who specializes in contracts and intellectual property. So yes, having the appropriate lawyer is important. No point visiting a dentist if you have a broken arm.</p> <p>Also be very wary of a contract that has been drafted for you that seems overly complicated. &nbsp;If the language seems hard to understand then it could lead to unnecessary negotiation. &nbsp;Some lawyers have been known to make things complex so that they are required to jump on a $ call to &lsquo;save the day&rsquo;. &nbsp;For the most part you should be able to negotiate your contract yourself. &nbsp;For our full serves projects we sometimes get our lawyers involved with their lawyers, but never for pure rendering jobs. &nbsp;We work with our lawyers to update our rendering contract when we feel it needs a refresh but that&rsquo;s a different matter.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Were most of the clauses in your contracts carefully planned or are they a history of lessons learned over the years?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>I would say that all of the clauses relating to process and credit are from our personal history, whereas our attorneys planned all the clauses relating to liability. &nbsp;They also helped us make valid arguments for clauses relating to deadlines.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Do you continue to update your contracts, if so, how often?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>Yes. &nbsp;We have separate language now that relates to two different types of imagery. The &ldquo;usage&rdquo; for design presentation, public review and competition type images versus marketing &amp; advertising images.&nbsp;</p> <p>For example what is important to understand here is when you are commissioned to produce an advertising/marketing image for a developer client who is selling/renting/leasing a property, you are not making that image to advertise and market the various other consultants/designers and anyone else on the project. &nbsp;If those consultants want to use your imagery to market themselves, publish in books etc, then they need to pay your firm additionally for that &ldquo;usage&rdquo;. &nbsp;That would be a usage license outside and separate to your agreement with the property developer. So in brief the usages are granted to promote and sell the property. &nbsp;This includes PR. It also includes usage for those investing in the property to promote their businesses. &nbsp;The developer also maintains usage rights to promote their business. &nbsp;They are the ones, with their investors, who are paying for it so you don&rsquo;t want to limit them. There has in the past been a free for all attitude, by third parties to use the images to promote their own businesses. It is an epidemic. &nbsp;We have seen Engineer firms for example, run ads in trade magazine using our work. Not only does this clause provide a level of control over our IP it also has the potential to create an additional stream of licensing income.&nbsp;</p> <p>Conversely when you are hired by an Architect/Designer to produce a &ldquo;design presentation/planning/competition&rdquo; image (an image they will be using to exhibit proof of concept to their client or get a project through planning), that image cannot be used as a Marketing &amp; Advertising image by their clients to later sell the property&hellip;.unless of course this is agreed upon in advance. &nbsp;</p> <p>What is critical is outlining in advance what the work can be specifically used for and at what exact fee. &nbsp;For example, if an Architect client insists that their client needs to be able to do whatever they want with it, then you need to have that in writing and price accordingly to cover such broad and undefined usage. We believe you can&rsquo;t just let an image go to serve anyone&rsquo;s purpose. &nbsp;There can be some grey areas and you will later have to use best judgment. &nbsp;The point is to have a piece of signed paper to point to if you feel someone is violating usage rights.</p> <p>Perhaps all visualization firms already practice this way. My guess is they don&rsquo;t.&nbsp;</p> <p>While I am at it, I&rsquo;d like to explain that we have recently implemented a somewhat different approach and contract for Marketing Images in the US, versus Marketing images in the UK. In the US (especially in NYC) the broader development team specifically the Sales and Marketing team play a very important, significant and critical role in the production of marketing material. &nbsp;In the UK the Sales team is less active in the production of Marketing Materials. &nbsp;The Sales and marketing teams in the US are most often heavily involved in &lsquo;pre-development&rsquo; which is guiding the developer during the design process to ensure the product meets a market and specific demographic. &nbsp;This means that the production of an interior marketing image (for example, living spaces, kitchens, bathrooms, amenities etc) tends to be a working design process that is explored through rendering. &nbsp;The client and the Sales and Marketing Team&rsquo;s first true understanding of all that has been specified comes to life in preliminary previews. &nbsp;Even if an interior designer or decorator/stylist has supplied the client and DBOX with a full and detailed spec sheet, as soon as the intent is visualized it becomes a moving target. &nbsp;Why? Because the Sales and Marketing Team know what will sell and if what they are seeing doesn&rsquo;t fit that bill (&ldquo;it won&rsquo;t sell) then they and the developer will want to change some, if not all of what they are seeing.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is very easy to get swept up into this important design process, however it is very hard to track financially. &nbsp;Many of those initial comments that the development team might have about what they don&rsquo;t like, has nothing to do with the visual work but to do with the design that has been delivered to be visualized.</p> <p>To work through this and be fair with the client, we have started to bill all this design process hourly. &nbsp;It is an open-ended process and working through stages, with a constant drip of information and requests is too difficult to manage as a staged process with a production team. &nbsp;Once everything, and we mean everything, is in place (think of a finished real apartment that has been staged and the flowers have been moved into their final resting place), we then go to a flat fee for creating the marketing rendering. &nbsp;This has a series of stages that are to do with nuances, materiality, reflectivity etc. &nbsp;As soon as those flowers get moved, again, we go back to an hourly model until everything is once again in place. &nbsp;This approach encourages efficiency from the development team and can actually save the client money, while making our production schedules more manageable. &nbsp;We always have more rendering work (see reasons above relating to credit) than we can do, so the more efficient we can be the better for all involved. &nbsp;We&rsquo;d prefer to ultimately charge less and get the job done in efficient hours than charge more in inefficient stages. &nbsp;This approach can also be extended to exterior marketing renderings that have specific and complex landscape.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>What are some examples of clauses in a contract that are most important for companies working in visualization?</strong></p> <p></p> <p>I cannot say what is most important for other companies but below are clauses that have proved important for us.</p> <p>If you decide to use any of this language make sure you completely understand them. I would rather you contact me than just copy and paste.</p> <p>Lastly. &nbsp;You are on your own. &nbsp;DBOX is not in any way responsible for any language you use or edit&hellip;and before you dive in your Agreement (contract) has to be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of (whatever State or place you are based). Make sure it holds water where you are not where we are.</p> <p>The below is the tip of the iceberg. &nbsp;I have tried to present topics and clauses in this interview that we feel will be helpful to the industry as a whole. The industry is still relatively new and we all need to grow together. Perhaps there needs to be another forum that gets into deeper topics that come up when presenting a full service creative account contract.</p> <p>Ok..grab some popcorn.</p> <p></p> <p><br /><strong>SAMPLE CONTRACT CLAUSES</strong></p> <p></p> <p>The use by Client of individual X work products in connection with the Services shall be conclusive evidence that the Services relating to such individual X work products have been completed and approved and accepted by Client. Measurements are not independently verified and no on-site surveying is included in this Agreement. X will adjust dimensions at Client&rsquo;s request and will therefore not be responsible in the event of any disputes which arise relating to the accuracy or &ldquo;truthfulness&rdquo; of any representation.</p> <p>X is the sole and exclusive author and owner of any and all work product conceived and/or created in the performance of the Services hereunder and any work product conceived of, created and/or developed by XXXXXX prior to, independent of or outside the scope of this Agreement (the &ldquo;X Works&rdquo;), but not of any works in the public domain, works owned by a third party, or works owned or controlled and provided to X by Client. Logos and tradenames created for and finally approved by Client shall be deemed the exclusive property of Client. X shall have the sole right to file copyright registrations and the applications therefor with respect to the X Works with the (COUNTRY) Copyright Office but shall have no obligation to do so. Under no circumstances shall any of the X Works be deemed to be a &ldquo;work made for hire&rdquo;.</p> <p>Notwithstanding anything heretofore contained in this Agreement, including the license given to the Client to reproduce the XXXXXX Works in accordance with this Agreement, and without limitation of XXXXXX&rsquo;s rights in and to the XXXXXX Works incident to its ownership of the XXXXXX Works, XXXXXX shall retain the right to use all of the XXXXXX Works for its own promotional purposes including the right to display such work for publicity or promotional purposes, in trade shows, museums, exhibitions, compendia, advertising of all kinds, brochures and books depicting its work, as well as in advertising and promotional materials. XXXXXX will respect confidentiality and &ldquo;publicity hold&rdquo; requests from the Client before the project is made public by Client or its affiliates.</p> <p>XXXXXX will make all commercially reasonable efforts in order to meet the agreed deadline with a quality product, but this Agreement shall not be construed to mean that time is of the essence. During the course of the scheduled timeframe, XXXXXX will try to accommodate all of the Client&rsquo;s requests that do not put the project behind schedule. XXXXXX will notify the Client which requests might jeopardize the project schedule or budget.</p> <p>Client and XXXXXX each mutually waive all rights to consequential damages for claims, disputes, and other matters in question arising out of or relating to this Agreement. The liability of XXXXXX to Client under any claim relating to this Agreement or the performance of XXXXXX services shall in no event exceed the amount actually paid to XXXXXX under this Agreement. Any claim or dispute arising out of or relating to this Agreement, other than a dispute relating to non-payment by the Client, shall be subject to mediation as a condition precedent to arbitration, and such mediation shall be requested and conducted in accordance with the rules of the American Arbitration Association. Claims and disputes not resolved by mediation shall be decided by arbitration in accordance with the rules of American Arbitration Association, with the exception that that XXXXXX need not, at its sole discretion, arbitrate matters relating to non-payment under this Agreement. Client agrees to indemnify XXXXXX and hold it and its directors, officers, employees and agents harmless from and against any losses, claims, damages, judgments, costs, expenses and liabilities (collectively &ldquo;Liabilities&rdquo;) and will reimburse each of them for all reasonable legal fees and expenses, including the reasonable fees and expenses of counsel, as they are incurred, in investigating, preparing or defending against any claim, action or proceeding brought by a third party, which is caused by, arises out of or relates to the Services, this Agreement or the Project and which is not caused or contributed to by any breach of or default by XXXXXX under this Agreement or by any negligence of XXXXXX.</p> <p>If for any reason the Client stops progress on the Services for more than 5 days, the job will be re-scheduled into XXXXXX&rsquo;s production schedule at XXXXXX&rsquo;s convenience. If Client fails to a make payment when due, the job may be re-scheduled or terminated at the discretion of XXXXXX. Client shall be fully responsible for all of its payment obligations hereunder, regardless of the Client&rsquo;s financial arrangements with third parties. In the event that any sales, use, excise or similar taxes shall be imposed under any federal or state law with respect to the Services or use of the XXXXXX Works, Client shall be responsible for payment of such taxes and XXXXXX shall have no responsibility therefor. All payments by Client to XXXXXX under this Agreement shall be due and payable no more than 30 days from the date of each invoice sent by XXXXXX. Amounts unpaid after 45 days from the date of invoice shall bear interest at the prime rate then charged by Citibank N.A. in New York City plus 2%, or the maximum interest rate allowed by law, whichever is lesser, which interest shall accrue daily starting on the 45th day after the applicable invoice is sent to Client.</p> <p>In order to evidence that XXXXXX is the owner of the copyright with respect to all XXXXXX Works and to give the proper professional credit to XXXXXX, the Client shall cause the following notice to appear visibly near or at the bottom of each reproduction of each XXXXXX Work whenever it is used: &ldquo;&copy; XXXXXX, Inc.&rdquo;</p> <p></p> <p>NOTE. Make sure you have credit guidelines for all social media channels. &nbsp;While they are hard to chase at least you can ask for credit when someone with 3M IG followers uses an image without credit.</p> <p>Last but not least some &ldquo;usage&rdquo; language. &nbsp;Please make sure you read this in conjunction with the discussion (i) above.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Use of Work Product:</strong></p> <p>(a) X hereby grants to Client, Client&rsquo;s Agents and Allowed Affiliates(as defined below) a nonexclusive, nontransferable, royalty-free license to use, reproduce, distribute and publicly perform and display the X Works solely to promote, market and advertise the Project and Client. &nbsp;For the purposes only of this Section, &ldquo;Client&rsquo;s Agents&rdquo; means public relations firms, marketing firms, advertising firms, sales agents and leasing agents engaged by Client to promote the Project or Client.</p> <p>(b)The license granted in Section 8.2(a) specifically and without limitation does not include the right to license, sublicense or otherwise allow any use of any of the rights granted in Section 8.2(a) to or by any third party, including but not limited to Client&rsquo;s affiliates, agents, third party vendors, contractors, subcontractors, architects, designers, interior designers, engineers and/or construction companies. &nbsp;Notwithstanding the foregoing, Client may sublicense or otherwise allow the Allowed Affiliates to use the X Works pursuant to Section 8.2(a).</p> <p>The &ldquo;Allowed Affiliates&rdquo; means [list the specific parties who are allowed to use the X Works].</p> <p>X agrees, in its sole discretion, to respect any reasonable confidentiality and &ldquo;publicity hold&rdquo; requirements imposed by Client on the publication of X Works. &nbsp;Notwithstanding the forgoing, X retains the right, after the X Works have been made public, to use all X Works and other material created under this Agreement in all media now known or later developed.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>About Matthew Bannister</strong><br /><br /><img style="float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol3/Matthew_3.jpg" width="200" height="267" />Matthew Bannister founded <a href="http://www.dbox.com/" target="_blank">DBOX</a> immediately upon completing his graduate studies in architecture in 1996. His vision was, and remains, a unique multi-disciplinary design and communications agency that produces intelligent creative solutions across multiple platforms and mediums for clients in property development, architecture, and the arts. Matthew has consistently focused on building and nurturing a team whose talents include creative direction, branding, design, photography, film, and digital experiences. In addition to his operational responsibilities, which entail frequent travel between DBOX&rsquo;s studios in London, New York, and Miami, Matthew is a hands-on creative director. He leads internal design reviews, directs films, and shoots many of DBOX&rsquo;s lifestyle campaigns. <br /><br />In 2006, Matthew was named one of &lsquo;The World's Top Creatives Under 40&rsquo; by Wallpaper* magazine, and was named &lsquo;Avant Guardian&rsquo; for emerging fashion photography by Surface Magazine. In 2015, he was named one of &lsquo;The 20 Biggest Power Players In New York City Real Estate&rsquo; by the New York Post. Under his leadership, DBOX has been the recipient of multiple awards, including the Emmy&reg; Award, the World Luxury Award, the Golden Award of Montreux, the Type Directors Club Award of Excellence, the NAHB Nationals, and the American Design Awards.<br /><br /> Matthew studied fine art at the Parsons School of Design, he earned a Bachelors of Architecture from Cornell University, and earned a Masters of Architecture from Princeton University. He has taught visual communications at the School of Visual Arts, Parsons School of Design, and at The Graduate School of Architecture at Princeton University. He is currently a visiting lecturer at the School of Architecture, Art &amp; Planning at Cornell University.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:35:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138903.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/business-in-arch-viz-vol-4---contractsFine Art Friday - Vol. 6Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/fine-art-friday---vol-6"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137830.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of curated works across the centuries. &nbsp;Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature?&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank">Let us know!</a></p> <p>If you want hands on training to really get your creative juices flowing, we highly recommend the excellent work being done by Nikos Nikolopoulos and Damien Fennell at&nbsp;<a href="https://www.creativelighting.co/" target="_blank">Creative Lighting</a>. They have regular online and live training that has amazing feedback. Hands down the best inspirational classes you can find in architectural visualization.</p> <div></div> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Alexander_Nasmyth_-_Princes_Street_with_the_Commencement_of_the_Building_of_the_Royal_Institution_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><br /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Alexander_Nasmyth_-_Princes_Street_with_the_Commencement_of_the_Building_of_the_Royal_Institution_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="462" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Princes Street with the Commencement of the Building of the Royal Institution<br />Artist: Alexander Nasmyth<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1825</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/John_Wilson_Carmichael_-_A_View_of_Murton_Colliery_near_Seaham_County_Durham_1843.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/John_Wilson_Carmichael_-_A_View_of_Murton_Colliery_near_Seaham_County_Durham_1843-sm.jpg" width="630" height="422" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: A View of Murton Colliery near Seaham, County Durham<br />Artist: James Wilson Carmichael<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1843</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Cole_Thomas_View_of_Florence_from_San_Miniato_1837.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Cole_Thomas_View_of_Florence_from_San_Miniato_1837-sm.jpg" width="630" height="374" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: View of Florence<br />Artist: Thomas Cole<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1837</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Canaletto_-_Bucentaurs_return_to_the_pier_by_the_Palazzo_Ducale_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Canaletto_-_Bucentaurs_return_to_the_pier_by_the_Palazzo_Ducale_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="438" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Bucentaur's return to the pier by the Palazzo Ducale<br />Artist: Canaletto<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: from 1727 until 1729</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Karl_Friedrich_Schinkel_-_Medieval_Town_by_Water_-_WGA21002.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Karl_Friedrich_Schinkel_-_Medieval_Town_by_Water_-_WGA21002-sm.jpg" width="630" height="466" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Bucentaur's return to the pier by the Palazzo Ducale<br />Artist: Karl Friedrich Schinkel<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: circa 1830</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Karl_Friedrich_Schinkel_-_Schlo_am_Strom_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Karl_Friedrich_Schinkel_-_Schlo_am_Strom_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="469" /></a></p> <p class="p1">Title: Cathedral over a city / Medieval Town by Water<br />Artist: Karl Friedrich Schinkel<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1820</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Yosemite_Valley_Glacier_Point_Trail_by_Albert_Bierstadt.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Yosemite_Valley_Glacier_Point_Trail_by_Albert_Bierstadt-sm.jpg" width="630" height="401" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Yosemite Valley, Glacier Point Trail<br />Artist: Albert Bierstadt<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: circa 1873</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Eismann_Johann_Anton_-_Ein_Meerhafen.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Eismann_Johann_Anton_-_Ein_Meerhafen-sm.jpg" width="630" height="507" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Ein Meerhafen<br />Artist: Johann Anton Eismann<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 17<sup>th</sup> century</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Nighthawks_by_Edward_Hopper_1942.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Nighthawks_by_Edward_Hopper_1942-sm.jpg" width="630" height="344" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Nighthawks<br />Artist: Edward Hopper<br />Medium:<br />Date: 1942</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Albert_Bierstadt_-_The_Rocky_Mountains_Landers_Peak.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Albert_Bierstadt_-_The_Rocky_Mountains_Landers_Peak-sm.jpg" width="630" height="377" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak<br />Artist: Albert Bierstadt<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1863</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Halle_Dom_Infotafel_Feininger_detail.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Halle_Dom_Infotafel_Feininger_detail-sm.jpg" width="630" height="479" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Halle (Saale), Informationstafel beim Halleschen Dom<br />Artist: Lyonel Feininger<br />Medium: <br />Date: 1931</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/George_Bellows_-_Men_of_the_Docks_-_1912_-_The_National_Gallery.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/George_Bellows_-_Men_of_the_Docks_-_1912_-_The_National_Gallery-sm.jpg" width="630" height="449" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Men of the Docks<br />Artist: George Bellows<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: February 1912</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Berkheyde-Haarlem.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Berkheyde-Haarlem-sm.jpg" width="630" height="486" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: The Great Market in Haarlem<br />Artist: Gerrit Adriaenszoon Berckheyde<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1696</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Et_selskab_af_danske_kunstnere_i_Rom.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Et_selskab_af_danske_kunstnere_i_Rom-sm.jpg" width="630" height="519" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Et selskab af danske kunstnere i Rom<br />Artist: Constantin Hansen<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1837</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Auguste_Borgets_oil_on_canvas_painting_An_Indian_Mosque_on_the_Hooghly_River_near_Calcutta_1846.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol6/Auguste_Borgets_oil_on_canvas_painting_An_Indian_Mosque_on_the_Hooghly_River_near_Calcutta_1846-sm.jpg" width="630" height="498" /></a></p> <p class="p1">Title: An Indian Mosque on the Hooghly River near Calcutta<br />Artist: Auguste Borget<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1846</p>Fri, 07 Jul 2017 01:16:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137830.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/fine-art-friday---vol-6Interview Joris PutteneersJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/interview-joris-putteneers"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138905.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong>Please introduce yourself and tell us about your background.</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>My name is Joris Putteneers, I'm a 22 years old architecture student currently living in Ghent, Belgium. I grew up in Antwerp (Belgium) where I studied electro mechanics, but switched over to architecture when I was 17.</p> <p>The reason I switched was that I always had a strong interest in the structural and the logical and I had the feeling I couldn't express those interests in my current study.</p> <p>I can't say I was interested by architecture right from the start, it was more of a gradual process in which I learned to appreciate the craft more as time continued and experience was gained.&nbsp;</p> <p>I began working in 3D software when I was around 15. I started off with a basic polygon modeller like Sketchup and ended up somehow using vex scripting in Houdini 7 years later.&nbsp;</p> <p>At the moment my daily workflow primarily consists of three software packages.</p> <p>SideFX houdini as my main software, used for everything algorithmic and computational. Autodesk Fusion360 for parametric surface modelling and 3ds max for polygon modelling and rendering.</p> <p>It may not be your standard architecture software collection but it does the job for me perfectly.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Nano_03.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Nano_03-sm.jpg" width="630" height="1050" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Your work has a heavy focus on algorithmic and procedural design, what sparked your interest in this medium of 3d design?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;I always had a frustration with the way how 3D applications were being used in the field of architecture.</p> <p>Most people use 3d software as an extension of analog drawing without using the computational powers that computers are capable of.&nbsp;</p> <p>You draw lines to complete the desired shape. whether it is analog or digital, it is the same principle.&nbsp;</p> <p>When we talk about 3D software as a medium of architectural communication, in my opinion, it is also useful to think about what specifically is meant with digital architecture and digital fabrication. Is architecture digital when its design process resonates within the computer? Is is tool dependent? Is architecture digital when computation is used to solve problems that traditional architects weren&rsquo;t capable of solving? Is architecture digital when algorithms used in computation are also applicable in the fabrication process? I do not know the answer of these questions, but they are fun to think about.&nbsp;</p> <p>So in that aspect the process of learning how to program and write algorithms was more of a reaction to the way current 3D applications are being used. This was also the reason why I chose to learn SideFX &nbsp;Houdini a couple years ago as it is, in my opinion, the most flexible program on the market which gives you ultimate freedom and flexibility if used correctly.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xkI02PqhbBs?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Can you walk us through a few of your favorite projects and tell us a bit more about your creative and technical process?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>It is hard to pick a favorite one as I see most projects as a continuation of each other. What is the same for every project though is the very iterative design process. I brainstorm about a specific problem or goal and make a few tests. I do this digitally in Houdini and I make some quick small drawings of how it potentially may or should look like once it&rsquo;s finished. The first few tests and ideas are almost &nbsp;always rubbish and most of the time I throw them away, rethink and start over. It is a process that can go on many times before achieving a result that I&rsquo;m happy with. The good thing about working with Houdini is the fully procedural workflow. This means that, once you create something useful, you never lose the ability to alter it. You don&rsquo;t have to start all over again from scratch but can you &nbsp;build upon previous setups quickly. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Sui_generis_family.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Sui_generis_family-sm.jpg" width="630" height="165" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/synesthesia.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/synesthesia-sm.jpg" width="630" height="892" /></a></p> <p><strong>Can you provide some stats on your projects?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>For example, in &ldquo;Skizoid&rdquo;, my most recent project, I managed to get around 60gig production data,</p> <p>&nbsp;including:&nbsp;</p> <p>&bull; 2 180 000 vectors<br />&bull; 12 million surfaces<br />&bull; 3,8 billion voxels<br />&bull; 200 million polygons<br />&bull; 2860 .exr files for the associated short film<br /><br /></p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/218686019" width="630" height="268" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/218686019">Skizo&iuml;d, Spacial exploration of the objective _by Joris Putteneers</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/jorisputteneers">Joris Putteneers</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/218712558" width="630" height="385" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/218712558">Skizo&iuml;d, spacial exploration of the objective_technical</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/jorisputteneers">Joris Putteneers</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Do you have any favorite techniques or algorithms that you use more often?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;My favourite algorithm that I use the most is one I made myself, it is a vector based algorithm that can be divided into five chronological steps.&nbsp;</p> <p>1) It essentially takes subjective input parameters.</p> <p>For example:</p> <p>- surface area(m&sup2;) and volume(m&sup3;) room_01;<br />- amount of rooms/functions;<br />- surface perforation(%) depending on the total surface area, this is handy for calculation light values;<br />- the connectivity and interactivity between certain rooms;<br />- the (optimal) organization of different circulation patterns;<br />- optimal circulation between certain rooms;<br />- the relation between private-public, closed-open,..</p> <p>&nbsp;These parameters and relations can be written as float (e.g. 0.1, 5.8), integer (e.g. 1,2,3) or vector (e.g. 1.0, 5.8, 0.3) values so they are usable in the algorithm.&nbsp;</p> <p>2)These input values get translated into voxels (the 3d representation of a pixel) inside a volume as attributes. This is really handy as you can store multiple attributes and so a multitude of information inside a single voxel.&nbsp;</p> <p>3) Then I can translate these values into vectors as they create the base of the different spaces, the connectivity, the circulation etc.</p> <p>There is a clear hierarchical order to the process as the attributes intervene with each other creating a complex vector based structure.&nbsp;</p> <p>4) Now, the structure goes through a process which checks and recalculates misread attributes.&nbsp;</p> <p>5) Now we have the vector representative of the algorithm, the next step is to grant a certain mass to it.</p> <p>&nbsp;I achieve this by treating the vectors as a growing organism which excretes a resin with a variable viscosity value out of calculated stress points. This resin hardens after x hypothetical years which makes the structure permanent.</p> <p>&nbsp;This whole process is far from perfect and still has a lot of flaws. It is for example easy for certain values to be misinterpreted, misread and miscalculated which results in a multitude of different artefacts and feedback loops.</p> <p>Personally I don&rsquo;t mind these errors as they give the structure their aesthetic characteristics, but eventually i will try to eliminate them, as the algorithm evolves.</p> <p>&nbsp;After the process is completed, the structure is exported and rendered into Autodesk 3ds max with Fstorm render, Arnold Renderer or V-Ray, depending on speed, quality and flexibility needed for the project.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;Is the algorithm the final step? is this a work in progress? what are your next steps?</strong></p> <p>I like to mention, I have been constructing this series of algorithms over the past 1,5 years and it has come a long way since then. &nbsp;I do not think this series of algorithms has a final stage, I see it more as a research that gradually evolves and improves over time to solve different problems which traditionally trained architects may not have been able to.</p> <p>My next step would be to optimize the current algorithm, to implement some sort of very basic awareness so it can be used in projects when context is required.</p> <p>What I also like to do in the future, is to partially 3D print a portion of a current structure, at scale 1/1 so I can truly understand some of the intricacies of the surface functions at micro level, something you aren&rsquo;t able to do when you work purely digital.</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/algorithm-construction(11).gif" width="630" height="396" /></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/algorithm-construction(7).gif" width="630" height="615" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Your work is very reminiscent of work I&rsquo;ve seen from the Bartlett, you mentioned they are an inspiration?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>Yes they are indeed an inspiration, It really fascinates me how the school focuses most on their energy on experimentation, research, exploration and fabrication while combining these with the architectural fundamentals. &nbsp;</p> <p>What perhaps inspires me the most is their freedom to create and to explore all fields of architecture without being compromised by the professor&rsquo;s vision of what architecture should be.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is in big contrast with my current university where most of my professors are traditionally trained and are heavily focussed on the challenges of commercial building projects. Although professors with an interest and knowledge of computational design and fabrication are present, it is in very small amount.<br /><br /></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Skizoid_01.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Skizoid_01-sm.jpg" width="630" height="892" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Skizoid_Detail_01.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Skizoid_Detail_01-sm.jpg" width="630" height="1006" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Skizoid_printer.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/Skizoid_printer-sm.jpg" width="630" height="892" /></a></p> <p><strong>What are you trying to depict in your architecture?</strong></p> <p>I aim to depict an architecture without classification. I try to explore new levels of resolution and topological complexity, purely based upon a hybrid relationship between an algorithmic process and subjective interruptions.</p> <p>I try to achieve a delicate balance between control and relinquishment, between chaos and order, both natural and artificial.</p> <p>The algorithms I create, are deterministic as they do not incorporate random values, but the results are not entirely foreseeable either. Using this method, the resulting architecture can devise surprising topographies and topologies that go beyond what one could have traditionally conceived.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>You say, you use algorithms as a medium of creating architecture, are architects still necessary according to your logic?</strong></p> <p>When, in an unlikely future, the profession demands such algorithmic methods, I still think architects will be a very important part of the process. They still have a profound understanding of, light, composition, color, materiality, scale... These are parameters, which I think, can never be calculated by an algorithm as they are truly subjective and context dependent. These parameters can&rsquo;t be expressed by a series of numbers, even if the algorithm is optimized to handle those parameters.</p> <p>And in situations where the algorithm is practiced on a much larger scale, the size of a city for example, the architect will always be the overseer as the algorithm lacks the knowledge about the complexities of urban planning and human relations.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/synesthesia_vectorB.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/synesthesia_vectorB-sm.jpg" width="630" height="892" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/No_context_side.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/No_context_side-sm.jpg" width="630" height="892" /></a></p> <p><strong>You are still in school, what are your plans after you graduate? &nbsp;A career in architecture or visualization?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>That is a question I receive a lot actually, and frankly, I don't have a definitive answer to that. Although I will graduate as an architect, I don&rsquo;t think I will invest my time in building commercial projects.</p> <p>I wish to focus more on the theoretical aspects of architecture which will hopefully include lots of research and digital fabrication.&nbsp;</p> <p>At the moment I have some projects revolving film, VR and AR, concept design, architectural and product visualization, Houdini workshops, freelance vfx work, graphic and logo design,..</p> <p>I try to include lots of creative fields in my daily workflow as I believe it is the best way to keep your brain sharp and focussed and I hope to continue this path in the future.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What project are you working on now?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>Currently I'm working on a couple of projects, one is an extension of &ldquo;Synesthesia&rdquo;, where I made some attempts implementing an algorithm which calculates the optimal route for electrical wiring and drainage systems throughout the structure.&nbsp;</p> <p>Of course this is highly speculative as it doesn't include materiality and structural integrity but nonetheless, I really enjoy thinking &nbsp;about such ideas. I also believe &nbsp;that experimenting with these elements will be useful in the long run when the algorithm becomes more practical some day.&nbsp;</p> <p>Another project I'm working on uses the implementation of context. This is where the algorithm uses and interacts with a given context as a new set of parameters. This is in a very early stage but I do hope to have the first prototype in the course of the next two months.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What would be your dream project?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>My dream project would conclude a series of projects, covering different mediums and concepts as separate pieces of a larger interest, joined by passionated people with a willingness and drive to experiment.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/NanoB_01.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/NanoB_01-sm.jpg" width="630" height="1025" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/No_context_Detail_06.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_07/joris_putteneers/No_context_Detail_06-sm.jpg" width="630" height="386" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>What non-digital artists or works of art inspire you the most?</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I would say that I'm most inspired by texts and manifestos I read. This can include a lot of different topics, from philosophy, to mathematics, to biology, to architecture.</p> <p>At the moment for example, I'm really interested by William Bateson, a teratologist who was fascinated by deformities, mutations and abnormalities of the human body and how this was visible in their genetic code.&nbsp;</p> <p>I always search for ways I can relate my ideology to the topics I'm reading. I don't have a television on purpose so I try to read at least a couple of pages before going to bed which, I like to think, helps boost my creativity and knowledge.&nbsp;</p> <p>I also have a really big appreciation for the great painters Goya, Rembrandt, C&eacute;zanne, Monet... for their control over composition, light and color.</p> <p>Also some of my all time non-digital favorites include Lebbeus Woods, Francis Bacon, Nietzsche and Hansruedi Giger. Each for their own specific reasons.</p> <p><br /><br /></p> <p>My Ello page<br /><a href="https://ello.co/jorisputteneers" target="_blank">https://ello.co/jorisputteneers</a></p> <p>&nbsp;My B&eacute;hance page<br /><a href="https://www.behance.net/joris-mxe7cb%20" target="_blank">https://www.behance.net/joris-mxe7cb&nbsp;</a></p> <p>My Tumblr page<br /><a href="http://jorisputteneers.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">http://jorisputteneers.tumblr.com/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>Thu, 06 Jul 2017 12:52:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138905.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/interview-joris-putteneersBusiness in Arch Viz. Vol. 3 - Search for MonopolyJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/business-in-arch-viz-vol-3---search-for-monopoly"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138904.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /></a></p> <p><br />Welcome to the third installment of our new&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank" style="color: #f41837;">RebusFarm</a>&nbsp;for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out&nbsp;<a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><span color="#f41837" style="color: #f41837;">here</span></a></p> <p><span style="color: #555555; font-family: Arial, Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;"><br /><br /></span></p> <h1>Search for Monopoly</h1> <p><span style="font-size: 1.5em;">by Randall Stevens (CEO at <a href="http://getavail.com" target="_blank">AVAIL</a>)</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1.5em;"><br /></span></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol3/hok-new-york-canon-headquarter-imagecredit-pure.jpg" width="630" height="558" /></p> <p><span style="color: #555555; font-family: Arial, Tahoma, Verdana; font-size: 12px;">Image Credit: HOK | Canon Headquarters | Pure</span></p> <p><br /><br />Every business owner dreams of growth. &nbsp;In the end, you'd like to have all the customers; 100%, a monopoly. &nbsp;We all know that's impossible but it's not impossible to capture an outsized share of the market by serving your customers in new and unique ways. &nbsp;To do that you need to innovate. &nbsp;You must erect barriers, stifle the competition. &nbsp;I can't tell you what that looks like for your respective business but I can pass along a framework for thinking through it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is Innovation?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Let's first describe what we mean by "Innovation". &nbsp;The official definition is "a new method, idea, product, etc". &nbsp;Most people think about innovations in terms of product features or offerings, but in business, innovation often occurs when you reinvent parts of the process by which you deliver your product or service. &nbsp;This is referred to as a shift in "Business Model". &nbsp;</p> <p>In the early days of ArchVision (25 years ago) we were in the visualization services business like many of you. &nbsp;I remember painstakingly bidding projects based on the design information supplied to us. &nbsp;We'd take a set of drawings back to the office and pour over them trying to estimate how long it would take to build the model. &nbsp;This was in the days when nobody was supplying a 3d model. &nbsp;We had to build it from a set of 2D drawings. &nbsp;After a couple of years of that pain I saw that every project took about the same amount of time if you broke it down into different "scenes" or major areas of the project. &nbsp;With that knowledge under our belt we shifted our sales strategy to a simple $5K per room/area of a project and removed the time and complexity of providing customers with an estimate for their project. &nbsp;We innovated the selling process and could give customers an on-the-spot estimate of their project by counting the number of "areas" of the project they wanted to visualize. &nbsp;Sounds simple but that's an example of innovating part of the business that didn't involve technology advances.&nbsp;</p> <p>Skip forward 15 years later and ArchVision innovated its business model once again. &nbsp;By that time, we were in the software business selling RPC content libraries and plugins. &nbsp;In the 2007-08 time-frame we made the decision to move to a subscription model for RPC. &nbsp;Our product line had grown to approximately 100 RPC content libraries and over a dozen third party plug-ins. &nbsp;Rather than continuing to force customers to wade through what had become a complex product offering, and a pricey one at that (over $20K in retail value), we put everything into one subscription agreement and began charging $249/year/user for the same offering! &nbsp;We were innovating the business model to better suit the changes in the market and better serve our customers. &nbsp;That change came with a sizable investment in backend infrastructure for managing the subscriptions and an even larger investment in educating the market about the change. &nbsp;But it was worth it and today seems like standard fare. &nbsp;So how do you go about finding an innovative offering?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Creating a Unique Offering<br /><br /></strong></p> <p>I've become an avid follower of entrepreneur-turned-venture capitalist Peter Thiel. &nbsp;From his book "Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future", Thiel notes "Tolstoy opens Anna Karenina by observing: &lsquo;All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.&rsquo; &nbsp;Business is the opposite. &nbsp;All happy companies are different: each one earns a monopoly by solving a unique problem. &nbsp;All failed companies are the same: they failed to escape competition."</p> <p>Definitely a good read for those that are interested in the topic. &nbsp;Thiel does a great job of explaining the types of businesses you should steer away from for what should be obvious reasons. &nbsp;You know, the businesses with endless competitors that become a race to the bottom with no competitive advantage and zero profits. &nbsp;One method Thiel uses to test whether you're in a good business position or not is whether you can describe your market opportunity as narrow today but able to expand tomorrow. &nbsp;By contrast, a bad market is one where you must narrow your description to convince someone you're unique. &nbsp;He uses the example of restaurants as the prototypical limited market opportunity. &nbsp;If you describe your restaurant as "we're the only restaurant, that also provides takeout, on the south end of ____ serving traditional Indian cuisine", you might be in a limit growth opportunity business. &nbsp; By contrast someone like Google claims to have unlimited competitors if you compare their revenue to total worldwide marketing revenue, but when it comes to online search and advertising they're dominant. &nbsp;They make up competitors to keep the government off their back. &nbsp;Given they are currently only earning a fraction of all worldwide marketing dollars they have a lot of upside opportunity.&nbsp;</p> <p>If your value proposition is "we create beautiful renderings" you could potentially service a large audience but you'll have a limitless number of competitors. &nbsp;In order to differentiate you then have to say something like "we create architectural renderings for retail developers in the southwestern part of the US". &nbsp;And with that you've severely narrowed your audience and thus market opportunity. &nbsp;You'd rather say, "we are the only global provider of rendering services that can deliver with a turnaround of 24 hours" or "we provide a unique rendering style, using proprietary rendering techniques over a decade in development, that best captures the essence of our customer's commercial developments" or "we provide subscription rendering and VR services for AEC firms seeking to reduce overhead while maintaining "in-house", on-demand services". &nbsp;You don't have to develop technology to differentiate yourself. &nbsp;You can differentiate in how you deliver your products or services. &nbsp;Think Amazon. &nbsp;They are dominating the retail market by innovating delivery. &nbsp;They've now built an infrastructure that makes it nearly impossible for anyone to compete. &nbsp;They'll likely maintain that dominant position for a while until someone innovates on a different vector.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Getting to Ah-ha<br /><br /></strong></p> <p>There's no magic to the innovation process. &nbsp;The secret is to talk to your customers. &nbsp;It's in those conversations that you're likely to discover overlooked opportunities. &nbsp;Don't expect to find them in a single conversation. &nbsp;The "ah-ha" moment most likely happens after hundreds of conversations. &nbsp;It's in the questions you ask and subsequent conversations with your customers that reveal opportunities. &nbsp;It's your job as an entrepreneur to piece those conversations together, look for the patterns, and discover an opportunity to solve your customer's problems in new and unique ways.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Testing Ah-ha<br /></strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>Once you think you see an opportunity to innovate and create an offering to solve your customer's problems you need to test the theory. &nbsp;Until you've proven the theory by having customers agree to hand over their hard-earned money in exchange... it's just a theory. &nbsp;You're in search of what is referred to as Product/Market Fit (PMF). &nbsp;Until you reach PMF you are engaged in experimenting with your idea to see how customers react. &nbsp;Each of these customer-interaction "experiments" provides you with a clearer view of how well you're solving the problem, just how acute the problem really is, and how many customer's have the same problem (ie. size of the market). &nbsp;It's not an easy process, but the process does work.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Never stop innovating<br /></strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I've found the cycle of innovation in my career has run in relatively steady 7 year cycles. &nbsp;My theory is that's about the amount of time needed to identify a problem, test multiple hypotheses, develop a solution, reach Product/Market Fit and deliver your offering at scale. &nbsp;If that sounds like a long time, it can be. &nbsp;It's also why not everyone is cut out for this line of work. &nbsp;There are no guarantees but I've found it's one of the most rewarding ways you can spend your professional time. &nbsp;Once you get comfortable with the customer learning / validation process you'll engage in it constantly. &nbsp;And by the time year 7 comes you'll have already begun thinking about and talking to customers about what's next.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>About Randall:</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/vol3/randall.jpg" width="200" height="200" />Randall Stevens is an AEC industry veteran with over 25 years of software development, sales and management experience. Randall founded ArchVision in 1991, a software company specializing in 3D graphics and content management technology for the design industry. Randall offers a unique combination of expertise in software and graphics technology, coupled with a background and degree in architecture. Randall is the inventor of the software technology Rich Photorealistic Content (RPC) currently being used by AEC customers in more than 100 countries and chosen by Autodesk as the native tree &amp; planting solution for Revit. Through ArchVision, Randall has built relationships with the industry's leading design and visualization software companies. &nbsp;Most recently Randall led product development for the AVAIL platform, a fresh approach to the AEC market's content management challenges. &nbsp;Randall is the Founder/CEO of AVAIL (<a href="http://getavail.com" target="_blank">getavail.com</a>).&nbsp;</p> <p>Randall received his B.A. from the University of Kentucky College of Architecture and served as an adjunct faculty member at the College of Design at the University of Kentucky from 1991-2007. &nbsp;He currently teaches entrepreneurship at the University of Kentucky College of Business. &nbsp;Randall chairs the Advisory Board for the University of Kentucky Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNET) and is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Governor's School for Entrepreneurs.&nbsp;</p> <p>Randall initiated the inaugural Building Content Summit (BCS) in 2015 and currently serves as the BCS Chairman. Randall owns and operates Base163 and Base110, co-working office spaces housing small tech and creative companies in Lexington, Kentucky. &nbsp;He is a frequent lecturer on technology and entrepreneurship.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Thu, 06 Jul 2017 11:43:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/07/138904.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/07/business-in-arch-viz-vol-3---search-for-monopolyMaking of: Project Soane - VR Lighting ExperienceJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/making-of-project-soane---vr-lighting-experience"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137745.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong>By</strong><br /><strong>Karam Bhamra, Principal CGI Designer, Hoare Lea</strong><br /><strong>Taran Singh, Interactive CGI Designer, Hoare Lea</strong><br /><strong>Chris Lane, CGI Designer, Hoare Lea&nbsp;</strong></p> <p></p> <p>If you haven&rsquo;t already checked it out, please see our Making of: Project Soane &ndash; Consols Transfer Office <a href="/2017/01/making-of-project-soane---consoles-transfer-office">here</a>. Following this, we took the 3D scene generated and used it to create a VR lighting experience.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>Our idea was to show how the sun path would have travelled through the, now demolished, Consols Transfer Office of the Bank of England, as designed by Sir John Soane, and built from 1788 to 1833. &nbsp;We chose the winter solstice (21st December), as this is when the sun&rsquo;s orbit would be at its lowest point, giving that wonderful effect of warm golden sunlight entering the building in the morning as the sun rises, turning to brighter, cooler hues as it progresses through midday, and then back to the warm light as the sun sets in the late afternoon.</p> <p>Soane would have designed and orientated the architecture in order to get as much daylight into the space as possible. We must remember that the Consols Transfer Office was built when electric lighting was not available and when fuel for gas and oil lamps would have been very expensive compared by today&rsquo;s costs. So, the best way to light a building at that time was with daylight &ndash; and Soane was a master of this.</p> <p>To show his mastery we placed the viewer in the heart of the Consols Transfer Office and allowed them to travel either forwards or backwards in time using a handheld controller in 15 minute increments. This allows the viewer to see and experience the feel of the space as the sun changes throughout the day.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/001_VR_Daylight_sunpath.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/001_VR_Daylight_sunpath-sm.jpg" width="630" height="353" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>As it reaches the late afternoon point, when it is almost totally dark, the scene switches to an imagined modern day lighting scheme, designed as if the space still existed. The viewer can turn certain lighting effects on and off, selecting which architectural elements are lit, thereby experimenting with changing the look and feel of the space,&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/002_VR_Lighting_design_treatments.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/002_VR_Lighting_design_treatments-sm.jpg" width="630" height="353" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Creating the 12-sided cubemap</strong></p> <p>Using the same model from which we created our stills, we generated 12-sided cubemaps using the workflow provided by Chaos Group (<a href="https://labs.chaosgroup.com/index.php/portfolio/guide-to-virtual-reality-2/" target="_blank">the VR guide by Chaos Group is here</a>).</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/003_VR_Chaos_Group.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/003_VR_Chaos_Group-sm.jpg" width="630" height="333" /></a></p> <p>We followed their workflow pretty much exclusively. However, camera placement was extremely important, as we wanted a clear view of the sky dome and to be able to see the sun path through the space.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/004_stereoscopic_cube_1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/004_stereoscopic_cube_1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="374" /></a></p> <p>We therefore placed the camera off-centre and near one of the counters for interest.</p> <p>The sun system was already setup with the correct geo-location and time of year (the winter solstice) for the still images. We animated the sun path over 120 frames from 7am &ndash; 5pm; this meant that each frame was rendered every five minutes. These were rendered at 18432 x 1536 and saved as uncompressed 32bit EXRs for maximum control (although little post-production was necessary).</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/005_Cubemap_rendering.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/005_Cubemap_rendering-sm.jpg" width="630" height="52" /></a></p> <p>Image showing a rendered cubemap at 12.00 midnight</p> <p>Even though we had rendered every five minutes, we decided it would be best to only show every 15 minutes, as little change in the sun path occurred within a five minute time frame, and we did not want it to take too long for viewers to travel through the day.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Splitting the panorama images into separate images via photoshop action<br /></strong></p> <p>Once the VRay stereoscopic images were rendered, we had to make them work in the game engine Unity3D. As the render comes out as a long strip of 12 cubemap images, (six for the left eye and six for the right, to create the stereoscopic effect) we had to devise a way of translating these images across to Unity3D without losing too much detail.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/006_cubemap_templ_guides.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/006_cubemap_templ_guides-sm.jpg" width="630" height="53" /></a></p> <p>Cubemap template to help determine from which eye and in which direction each image is looking &ndash; for example: LR = Left eye, looking Right; LL = Left eye, looking Left.</p> <p>We discovered that most game engines preferred images sized to &ldquo;power of two&rdquo; values, in order that they can take advantage of the data optimisation and compression built into the game engine. This meant that the long strip of cubemap images was not ideal and would have to divided and resized to the closest power of two values.&nbsp;</p> <p>We decided to split the VRay stereoscopic image into 12 separate images for each scene. Although this would increase the load on the Unity3D engine, it would give us the quality we wanted, without a dramatic decrease in performance.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/007_splitcubemapscript2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/007_splitcubemapscript2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="178" /></a></p> <p>This meant the textures squares could be better optimised for the game engine and gave us more control over the individual scene textures.&nbsp;</p> <p>To speed up the process, we wrote a script in Photoshop that could automatically split the stereoscopic image into twelve individual textures and flip the images appropriately.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Setting up cubemaps in Unity3D for left and right eyes</strong></p> <p>Using 3ds Max we created a box, flipped the faces inside out, and then unwrapped the UVs to map the 12 images onto two of these boxes, making one cube for the left eye and one for the right.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/008_Unity3Dcubes.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/008_Unity3Dcubes-sm.jpg" width="630" height="442" /></a></p> <p>The cubes were then imported into the Unity engine and placed in the same position, overlapping each other. Through scripting, the left cube would be hidden from the right eye of the stereoscopic camera, and the right cube hidden from the left eye of the stereoscopic camera, while ensuring each eye would see the correct 3D perspective.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/009_Unity3Dcameras.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/009_Unity3Dcameras-sm.jpg" width="630" height="578" /></a></p> <p>The same script was used to determine whether a VR device was attached to the machine, and if not it could switch to a single camera and only use the left cube for normal desktop viewing.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Automatically loading and changing textures via script</strong></p> <p>We faced the task of changing 12 images on 12 different textures every time the scene changed. It would have been extremely time consuming to set these textures and materials up manually &ndash; this would have involved creating lists of images and assigning them individually in the Unity editor.&nbsp;</p> <p>We solved this by writing a script that would automatically load the images from each folder and assign themselves to the cubemap textures. This made it easier to make changes and gave us the freedom to reprocess and replace the images.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/010_texturearray.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/010_texturearray-sm.jpg" width="630" height="864" /></a></p> <p>Texture array in Unity auto populated via script</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Scripting the controls</strong></p> <p>We set a time index which would control the whole scene.&nbsp;</p> <p>Whenever the time was changed it would run a function that would iterate through the cubemap textures and assign the correct texture (for the selected time of day) from the array list of hundreds of images.</p> <p>Finally, we added a handheld controller and mapped the forward and backward controls to the appropriate buttons and added an infographic to explain the function of each button.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/011_controls.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/011_controls-sm.jpg" width="630" height="507" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Below is the video version of the completed VR experience &ndash; designed to run on Oculus Rift:&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/181766427?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Creating a 3D stereoscopic web version</strong></p> <p>While we were pleased with the Oculus Rift version of our VR experience, showing this to a wider audience is not easy &ndash; VR is a great technology for visualising and its potential is obvious, but at present few people outside of the CGI industry have the high-end HMDs or hardware equipment necessary to run such content. We therefore decided to create a web-link version of the same experience that people can access as a standard 360 panorama on any browser or device, but also view in stereoscopic 3D when using a smartphone and a Google Cardboard VR unit.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/013_Web_link_Capture.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/013_Web_link_Capture-sm.jpg" width="630" height="385" /></a></p> <p>Standard 360 panorama mode in web browser</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/014_Web_link_VRmode1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/014_Web_link_VRmode1-sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>3D stereoscopic view in VR mode</p> <p></p> <p>We used a similar workflow as we had for Unity, starting by splitting the cubemap strip into separate images and then processing these images through <a href="https://krpano.com/" target="_blank">krpano</a> software, which is a lightweight html5 panorama viewer.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once krpano processed the images we could create different scenes, to which we added hotspots and controls using the built-in XML code, so that we could retain the interactivity of the Unity version. For viewing in VR mode with Google Cardboard, we had to change the interactive elements to operate using &lsquo;gaze control&rsquo; rather than the handheld controller. We also introduced new icons for changing the time of day and experimenting with the artificial lighting elements in the evening scenes. &nbsp;We did have to reduce the time increments to step through every hour, rather than every 15minutes &ndash; this was to keep the link and loading waiting times as light as possible.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/015_Weblink_VRmode2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/projectsoaneVR/015_Weblink_VRmode2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>The web version can be viewed by using the link <a href="http://bit.ly/hlsne360" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/hlsne360</a>. You will need a Google Cardboard VR unit to view in stereo 3D.</p> <p></p> <p>Hope you enjoy!</p>Tue, 30 May 2017 03:57:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137745.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/making-of-project-soane---vr-lighting-experienceFine Art Friday - Vol. 5Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-5"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137795.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of curated works from the 17th, 18th and 19th century. &nbsp;Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature? <a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank">Let us know!</a></p> <p>If you want hands on training to really get your creative juices flowing, we highly recommend the excellent work being done by Nikos Nikolopoulos and Damien Fennell at <a href="https://www.creativelighting.co/" target="_blank">Creative Lighting</a>. They have regular online and live training that has amazing feedback. Hands down the best inspirational classes you can find in architectural visualization.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/pierre-adrien-paris-architectural-fantasy-ruins-of-a-circular-temple-seen-through-a-natural-arch-ca-1785.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/pierre-adrien-paris-architectural-fantasy-ruins-of-a-circular-temple-seen-through-a-natural-arch-ca-1785-sm.jpg" width="630" height="488" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Architectural Fantasy: Ruins of a Circular Temple Seen through a Natural Arch</p> <p>Artist: Pierre-Adrien P&acirc;ris</p> <p>Medium: pen and black ink with watercolor and gouache over graphite on laid paper</p> <p>Date: c. 1785</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Louis_Carrogis_de_Carmontelle_French_-_Figures_Walking_in_a_Parkland_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Louis_Carrogis_de_Carmontelle_French_-_Figures_Walking_in_a_Parkland_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="73" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Figures Walking in a Parkland</p> <p>Artist: Louis Carrogis Carmontelle</p> <p>Medium: Watercolor and gouache with traces of black chalk underdrawing on translucent Whatman paper</p> <p>Date: between 1783 and 1800</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Thomas_Girtin_-_St._Pauls_Cathedral_from_St._Martins-le-Grand_London_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Thomas_Girtin_-_St._Pauls_Cathedral_from_St._Martins-le-Grand_London_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="808" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: St. Paul's Cathedral, from St. Martin's-le-Grand, London</p> <p>Artist: Thomas Girtin&nbsp;</p> <p>Medium: Gray wash and watercolor over graphite on beige, medium, slightly textured, wove paper</p> <p>Date: circa 1795</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/John_Warwick_Smith_-_The_Villa_Medici_Rome_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/John_Warwick_Smith_-_The_Villa_Medici_Rome_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="425" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: The Villa Medici, Rome</p> <p>Artist: John Warwick Smith</p> <p>Medium: Watercolor over graphite on medium, slightly textured, cream laid paper</p> <p>Date: circa 1784</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Max_Berthelin_-_Universal_Exhibition_1855._Palace_of_Industry_cross-section_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Max_Berthelin_-_Universal_Exhibition_1855._Palace_of_Industry_cross-section_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="292" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Universal Exhibition 1855. Palace of Industry, cross-section</p> <p>Artist: Max Berthelin</p> <p>Medium: Black ink and watercolour</p> <p>Date: 1854</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Eduard_Gaertner_-_Rear_view_of_the_Houses_at_Schlofreiheit_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Eduard_Gaertner_-_Rear_view_of_the_Houses_at_Schlofreiheit_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="369" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Rear view of the Houses at Schlo&szlig;freiheit</p> <p>Artist: Eduard Gaertner&nbsp;</p> <p>Medium:&nbsp;</p> <p>Date: 1855</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Louise_Rayner_Chester_The_Cross_looking_towards_Watergate_Street.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Louise_Rayner_Chester_The_Cross_looking_towards_Watergate_Street-sm.jpg" width="630" height="431" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Chester. The Cross, looking towards Watergate Street</p> <p>Artist: Louise Rayner&nbsp;</p> <p>Medium: watercolor</p> <p>Date: from 1886 until 1903</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Aerts_Imaginary_architecture.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Aerts_Imaginary_architecture-sm.jpg" width="630" height="349" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Chester. The Cross, looking towards Watergate Street</p> <p>Artist: Hendrick Aerts&nbsp;</p> <p>Medium: oil on panel</p> <p>Date: circa 1602</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Samuel_Dukinfield_Swarbreck_attr_View_of_Edinburgh_1827_7.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Samuel_Dukinfield_Swarbreck_attr_View_of_Edinburgh_1827_7-sm.jpg" width="630" height="480" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: View of Edinburgh</p> <p>Artist: Samuel Dukinfield Swarbreck</p> <p>Medium:&nbsp;</p> <p>Date: 1827</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Hammershoi_Dust_motes_dancing.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Hammershoi_Dust_motes_dancing-sm.jpg" width="630" height="740" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: Dust Motes Dancing in the Sunbeams</p> <p>Artist: Vilhelm Hammersh&oslash;i</p> <p>Medium: oil on canvas</p> <p>Date: 1900</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Koninck_JMC.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/Koninck_JMC-sm.jpg" width="630" height="535" /></a></p> <p>Title: Philosopher with an Open Book, copy of Rembrandt's Philosopher in Meditation</p> <p>Artist: Salomon Koninck</p> <p>Medium: oil on canvas</p> <p>Date: circa 1645</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/John_Martin_-_The_Evening_of_the_Deluge_-_WGA14147.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/John_Martin_-_The_Evening_of_the_Deluge_-_WGA14147-sm.jpg" width="630" height="419" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Title: The Evening of the Deluge</p> <p>Artist: John Martin</p> <p>Medium: Mezzotint and engraving</p> <p>Date: 1828</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/jm2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol5/jm2-sm.jpg" width="630" height="447" /></a></p> <p>Title: The Fall of Babylon</p> <p>Artist: John Martin</p> <p>Medium: Mezzotint and engraving</p> <p>Date: 1831</p>Fri, 26 May 2017 01:00:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137795.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-5RebusFarm Business in Arch Viz. Vol. 2Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/rebusfarm-business-in-arch-viz-vol-2"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137743.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /><br /><br /><br /><br /></a>Welcome to the second installment of our new <a style="color: #f41837;" href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank">RebusFarm</a> Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br />The first two articles in the series will feature interesting business-related highlights from our last CGarchitect industry survey. &nbsp;<br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank <a style="color: #f41837;" href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank">RebusFarm</a> for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out <a style="color: #f41837;" href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank">here</a></p> <p></p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" src="http://e.infogr.am/rebusfarm_business_in_arch_viz_vol_2?src=embed" title="RebusFarm Business in Arch Viz. Vol. 2" width="630" height="2834" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="border: none;"></iframe></p> <div style="padding: 8px 0; font-family: Arial!important; font-size: 13px!important; line-height: 15px!important; text-align: center; border-top: 1px solid #dadada; margin: 0 30px;"><a href="https://infogr.am/rebusfarm_business_in_arch_viz_vol_2" style="color: #989898!important; text-decoration: none!important;" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">RebusFarm Business in Arch Viz. Vol. 2</a><br /><br /></div> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Tue, 23 May 2017 23:49:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137743.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/rebusfarm-business-in-arch-viz-vol-2Interview with _blankRepository: Makers of CG food so real you could almost eat itJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/blankrepository-makers-of-cg-food-so-real-you-could-almost-eat-it"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137650.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/RenderedImage.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/RenderedImage-sm.jpg" width="630" height="629" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Please introduce yourself and your background in the 3D industry</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.blankrepository.com/" target="_blank">_blankRepository</a>, Co-Founded by two partners coming from different professional backgrounds and generations. Ivan Mery a 57 years old, old school designer, airbrusher and professional photographer and Ian Mery, a 26 years old CG Artist and entrepreneur, who had worked together in many projects plus several years in the Archviz business in Santiago, Chile. We are united not only by blood but by passion and dedication for quality work.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>I think you guys have one of the most unique and high quality niche collections within the 3d entourage space, how did you decide to start up _blankRepository?</strong></p> <p>We were out of a job, no much money or plans for the future, but we had met this incredible technology a couple of months before while doing a 3D shortcut called Isolated.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/116451815" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><a href="https://vimeo.com/116451815">ISOLATED</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user3939609">Peak Pictures</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;I was thinking about doing something with photogrammetry since we had to use it to scan the faces of the actors in the shortcut. Looking for quick money we thought we could use it to scan women shoes to do 3D catalogs, but we quickly became discouraged by the idea of scanning shoes all day.</p> <p>Then one day, out of thin air I began to remember all the times I needed 3D fruits or vegetables to put on my scenes, and then I realized all the times I needed 3D food for my commercial work and I found myself purchasing bad quality models over and over again, which didn't looked or felt like food. Then It was all clear, people needed the CG food, let us give them the CG food!</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s behind the name _blankRepository?</strong></p> <p>I &nbsp;wanted to name the company DigitalRepository, but!.... It was already taken.&nbsp;</p> <p>I wanted to put some meaning into the name, but I didn&rsquo;t want to use CG, 3D or scan. So, I knew I loved the word Repository, because of what it meant and we were making something new, something from scratch, and I wanted to add that concept to the name.</p> <p>One day, while searching some stuff on the internet, I saw that _blank was in every new tab I created on my web browser and I thought it was a interesting concept, so I put them together.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>Is architecture your primary market or are there other verticals that are getting more attention?</strong></p> <p>Actually, VFX houses, Studios and independent CG artists are our primary market. Indeed, architecture was our first market when we first opened, but once we got more attention by the CG industry and started using social media, our clients changed drastically and began to ask for other kinds of products.&nbsp;</p> <p>We think new people are discovering <a href="https://www.blankrepository.com/" target="_blank">_blankRepository</a>, coming from new backgrounds like VR or 3D Printing, which is awesome because those market really take advvandatges of all the features of 3d scanning.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>I envision your working space feeling a bit like working in the produce section of the supermarket. Does your screen get wet every time the water mister comes on? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Pretty much, yes. Usually a lot of corn starch flying around to makeup some chocolate or pastry. Some fruits getting bad on drawers, lots and lots of plastic wrappers and sometimes bitten donuts or delicatessens by one of our hungry crew guys.</p> <p>It's usually a pretty clean environment, because most of the organic products have to be taken on the same day as they were purchased.&nbsp;</p> <p>But be honest, everything looks yummy but it's usually hards as a rock, for production purposes.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_1737.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_1737-sm.jpg" width="630" height="454" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_0012-sm.jpg" width="630" height="375" /></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Can you walk us through the process of developing your models. &nbsp;From the time you think that chocolate Easter bunnies are the next project and walking into the store, to the final model.</strong></p> <p>It&rsquo;s random. Ha.</p> <p>Well not 100% random, we do have a list, but we are emotional people so maybe we saw an awesome avocado today, and that&rsquo;s it. We are making avocados today, or sometimes it's like the easter bunny, in which we looked at the calendar and realized easter is coming and we really don't have any bunnies.&nbsp;</p> <p>But, we usually get a lot of request plus we know what kind of product people are looking for, so we try to do them first.</p> <p>Once we decided what we are going to scan the many, many, many trips to the stores begins.</p> <p>One thing is to say &ldquo;I want to scan an onion&rdquo;, but other thing is finding that right onion, hopefully 3 of them just in case, to make some cuts, like a half onion.</p> <p>Once you have the right model, it's all about figuring out the lighting and photo technique you are gonna use, then&hellip; shoot the object like a gazillion times, well maybe just 400 but, that's a lot.&nbsp;</p> <p>Then it&rsquo;s mostly processing time on the photogrammetry software.&nbsp;</p> <p>The final stage involves, projecting, re-meshing and creating normal and displacement maps in Zbrush and off course creating al the catalog images plus our usual render of product of the week.</p> <p>So it's quite a lot.</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_0019-sm.jpg" width="630" height="417" /></p> <p><strong>How long does it normally take to create a model?</strong></p> <p>Tricky. From 5 hours to 5 days really. It&rsquo;s a complex process, more related to an artisan than to an assembly line.&nbsp;</p> <p>It&rsquo;s not like we have a huge machine, in which we put the model in and wait a couple of hours and done, Easy Bake Scans! The process is slow and painful, but worth it.</p> <p>It all goes down to the main features of the object you want to scan. Is it shiny? Translucent? Reflective? Have many singular spots? Is it smooth or rough? All things matter and directly affect processing and production time.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>How large and detailed are your models?</strong></p> <p>A raw scan usually contains between 800,000 and 8,000,000 poly faces. So the meshes are pretty thick and detailed.&nbsp;</p> <p>We like to work we good quality textures, so we have textures at 4K, 8K and up to 16K for custom jobs.</p> <p>We don't retouch our models because we believe the quality is in the raw scan itself.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/IntFootageFinal.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/IntFootageFinal-sm.jpg" width="630" height="1326" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/OriginalRawScan.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/OriginalRawScan-sm.jpg" width="630" height="622" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/OriginalPictures.jpg"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/OriginalPictures-sm.jpg" width="630" height="242" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/FinalMaps.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/FinalMaps-sm.jpg" width="630" height="223" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/OriginalTexture.jpg" width="630" height="709" /></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/ReMeshedModel.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/ReMeshedModel-sm.jpg" width="630" height="583" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/FinalModel.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/FinalModel-sm.jpg" width="630" height="160" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>You had mentioned you were using photogrammetry. Was it hard to develop a custom pipeline for food or are your techniques as one would expect?</strong></p> <p>Yes, because there's no such thing as a pipeline for food. There is a pipeline for oranges, for croissants, for avocados. All different, all waiting to be discovered, nonetheless there are some ground rules for shooting basically every object.</p> <p>The techniques for photographing food and doing photogrammetry with food are fairly different. In photogrammetry is all about getting flat lighting, no specular or reflections and sharp focus all the time.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_0005.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_0005-sm.jpg" width="630" height="755" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_0006.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_0006-sm.jpg" width="630" height="940" /></a></p> <p><strong>I&rsquo;ve heard many stories of laypeople to the 3D industry thinking they were buying a real sofa for $50. Have you had anyone question why your apples cost $10?</strong></p> <p>No, but that was always one of my worries before opening the store. Am I gonna get mail asking why a donut is $20? Or if do I sell the kilo of apples at $30 or a single apple at $30?</p> <p>I'm still waiting for that person.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>You must have some interesting stories creating food models? &nbsp;Any funny or nightmare stories? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p>When we first opened <a href="https://www.blankrepository.com/" target="_blank">blankrepository.com</a>, we were really trying to be creative with our scans, so we had the brilliant idea of making 3D cereal bowls.&nbsp;</p> <p>That basically meant that we had to glue the cereal pieces together one by one. At first it was kind of cool, but by the 100th piece, it became horrible.</p> <p>After tons of glue and cereal, in a couple of days we finally had three different cereal bowls!</p> <p>That same day we scanned the cereal loops bowl and it was awesome, actually you can find it on our store.</p> <p>One day, our late dog Ron, entered the office and ate a bunch of breads, 2 apples, a chocolate, and some nuts. He didn't like the marshmallow, but he loved our cereal bowls, he even ate the expanded polystyrene ball inside, he had diarrhea and we don't&rsquo; scan cereal any more.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_1730.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_1730-sm.jpg" width="630" height="362" /></a></p> <p><strong>How many models are you creating and do you get requests?</strong></p> <p>Right now, we are uploading one model per week, but we have many on the process, this year we are making more than 200 products. We are creating scans on a daily basis.</p> <p>We constantly get requests, from custom jobs to somebody just asking us to do one model in particular.</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_4507.jpg" width="630" height="690" /></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Are there any foods you never want to see again?</strong></p> <p>Not yet. But I can assure you I have some strong candidates and definitely I can&rsquo;t eat a meal or go to the supermarket without thinking, Can we scan this?</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What has been the most challenging part of building up your model collection and determining your workflow?</strong></p> <p>Money, building something like this without money is so difficult. We started this thing from scratch, just working really hard creating a workflow for something that has almost no documentation or examples or anyone to talk about it, just trial and error.</p> <p>But, the response of the audience and clientes has been amazing.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_1724.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/_blankrepository/DSC_1724-sm.jpg" width="630" height="402" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Did you plan your rotten food collection, or did someone forget to throw out the food over the weekend?</strong></p> <p>We were thinking about advertising and what kind of models we should scan, like beautiful red apples and big oranges, but then talking about it, the idea of something rotten as something beautiful or useful appeared on our minds. And after watching something organic decompose, I can say it's actually quite beautiful.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>How do your models compare to other food collections out there? What separates you?</strong></p> <p>Quality, quantity, diversity. But most of all, we love what we do, we take a lot of pride on what we do, and I think you can see that in our final products.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>What are your plans for the future?</strong></p> <p>We want to be the CGI Food. Not only with a massive catalog but understanding the needs of the industry and implementing new technologies.</p>Mon, 22 May 2017 03:20:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137650.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/blankrepository-makers-of-cg-food-so-real-you-could-almost-eat-itFine Art Friday - Vol. 4Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-4"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137655.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p class="p1"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;">With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of works in the public domain. Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature?&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank" style="border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; color: #646464;">Let us know</a><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;">!</span></p> <p class="p1"><b><br /></b></p> <p class="p1"><b><br /></b></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Giovanni_Antonio_Canal_il_Canaletto_-_Santi_Giovanni_e_Paolo_and_the_Scuola_di_San_Marco_-_WGA03862.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Giovanni_Antonio_Canal_il_Canaletto_-_Santi_Giovanni_e_Paolo_and_the_Scuola_di_San_Marco_-_WGA03862-sm.jpg" width="630" height="378" /></a></p> <p class="p1">Title: Santi Giovanni e Paolo and the Scuola di San Marco&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Canaletto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1726</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Rio_dei_Mendicanti.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Rio_dei_Mendicanti-sm.jpg" width="630" height="449" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Rio dei Mendicanti&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Canaletto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1723-1724</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Canaletto_-_Capriccio_of_the_Scuola_di_San_Marco_from_the_Loggia_of_the_Palazzo_Grifalconi-Loredan.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Canaletto_-_Capriccio_of_the_Scuola_di_San_Marco_from_the_Loggia_of_the_Palazzo_Grifalconi-Loredan-sm.jpg" width="630" height="392" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Capriccio of the Scuola di San Marco from the Loggia of the Palazzo Grifalconi-Loredan</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Canaletto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1750</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Giovanni_Antonio_Canal_il_Canaletto_-_Perspective_View_with_Portico_-_WGA03965.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Giovanni_Antonio_Canal_il_Canaletto_-_Perspective_View_with_Portico_-_WGA03965-sm.jpg" width="630" height="886" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Perspective View with Portico</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Canaletto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1765</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Artgate_Fondazione_Cariplo_-_Migliara_Giovanni_Veduta_di_una_piazzetta_a_Venezia.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Artgate_Fondazione_Cariplo_-_Migliara_Giovanni_Veduta_di_una_piazzetta_a_Venezia-sm.jpg" width="630" height="469" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Perspective View with Portico</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Giovanni Migliara</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1812-1815</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Giovanni_Antonio_Canal_il_Canaletto_-_The_Grand_Canal_from_Campo_San_Vio_towards_the_Bacino_-_WGA03869.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Giovanni_Antonio_Canal_il_Canaletto_-_The_Grand_Canal_from_Campo_San_Vio_towards_the_Bacino_-_WGA03869-sm.jpg" width="630" height="378" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: The Grand Canal from Campo San Vio towards the Bacino</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Canaletto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1729-1734</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Bernardo_Bellotto_il_Canaletto_-_Capriccio_Padovano_-_WGA01821.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Bernardo_Bellotto_il_Canaletto_-_Capriccio_Padovano_-_WGA01821-sm.jpg" width="630" height="419" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Capriccio Padovano</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Bernardo Bellotto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: between 1740-1742</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/1385082667-canaletto---venice---piazza-san-marco.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/1385082667-canaletto---venice---piazza-san-marco-sm.jpg" width="630" height="764" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Piazza San Marco Looking East from the North-West Corner&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Canaletto</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: between circa 1760</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Gentile_Bellini_001.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Gentile_Bellini_001-sm.jpg" width="630" height="287" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Sermon of St Mark in Alexandria</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Gentile Bellini</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: between 1504 and 1507</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Cole_Thomas_The_Architect-s_Dream_1840.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Cole_Thomas_The_Architect-s_Dream_1840-sm.jpg" width="630" height="398" /></a></p> <p class="p1">Title: The Architect's Dream</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Thomas Cole</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: 1840</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Francesco_Guardi_-_An_Architectural_Caprice_-_WGA10863.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Francesco_Guardi_-_An_Architectural_Caprice_-_WGA10863-sm.jpg" width="630" height="866" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: An Architectural Caprice</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Francesco Guardi</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: before 1777</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Dirck_van_Delen_-_Architectural_Capriccio_with_Jephthah_and_His_Daughter_-_WGA6275.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Dirck_van_Delen_-_Architectural_Capriccio_with_Jephthah_and_His_Daughter_-_WGA6275-sm.jpg" width="630" height="412" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: <i>Architectural Capriccio with Jephthah and His Daughter</i></p> <p class="p1">Artist: Dirk van Delen</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Panel</p> <p class="p1">Date: before 1633</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Antonio_Joli_-_Capriccio_with_Elegant_Figures_-_WGA11958.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Antonio_Joli_-_Capriccio_with_Elegant_Figures_-_WGA11958-sm.jpg" width="630" height="463" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Capriccio with Elegant Figures</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Antonio Joli</p> <p class="p1">Medium: Oil on Canvas<br /> Date: first half of 18<sup>th</sup> century</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/English_school_1st_half_of_19th_Century_-_Watercolor_-_Vue_de_la_Cathedrale_de_Rouen_-_-28x37.5cm.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/English_school_1st_half_of_19th_Century_-_Watercolor_-_Vue_de_la_Cathedrale_de_Rouen_-_-28x37.5cm-sm.jpg" width="630" height="448" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Vue de la Cath&eacute;drale de Rouen</p> <p class="p1">Artist:&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1">Medium: watercolour<br /> Date:&nbsp;</p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Louise_Rayner_Durham_Cathedral_from_Framwellgate_Bridge.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol4/Louise_Rayner_Durham_Cathedral_from_Framwellgate_Bridge-sm.jpg" width="630" height="375" /></a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p1">Title: Louise Rayner Durham Cathedral from Framwellgate Bridge</p> <p class="p1">Artist: Louise Rayner</p> <p></p> <p class="p1">Medium: watercolour<br /> Date: 1924</p>Fri, 19 May 2017 01:16:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137655.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-4The Making of The StepJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/the-making-of-the-step"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137636.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong>BY <a href="http://www.aswins.com/" target="_blank">ASWIN GOPAKUMAR</a><br /><br />INTRODUCTION</strong></p> <p>This project is about re-kindling my passion with my work, it is also about exploring design skills, for which I choose to first design and then visualize it. I wanted it realistic, different and thoughtful. So three things were addressed doing this project, Design - Visualization &ndash; Learning. I named this project &lsquo;The Step&rsquo; because when I started this project I was clueless of how I would do it, and what I dreamed to do back then was beyond my skills. What I learned is, to put effort every day, have the patience and allow it to happen. All that matters is that single step; rest of the story just happens by itself. Hope this sends a message to many including myself, to do what you love and keep doing it till you reach and to believe in yourself!</p> <p>This is a design to visualization project, so first part of the article covers the idea formation. The later part is about tools that have been used and how the visualization was carried out, and finally the output / final renders. For ease, the main contents of this article is presented in order below.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>THE DESIGN</strong></p> <p>It all started when I came across this image somewhere while going through some reference images for my office job.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image01.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image01-sm.jpg" width="630" height="946" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>It made me think about the possibility of turning this into a living space and stared at it for a long time; to understand the work, about what can be done, what is possible. &nbsp;Once a rough sketch was made up, work started. Did a camera match and started modelling the STEPS, and the first file looked like this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image02.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image02-sm.jpg" width="630" height="946" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Spaces were introduced between the steps to make room for the different living areas in the apartment. The left and right sides, the roof, had to be sorted out. Also had to make sure that it had all the areas that one would need in a house; importantly each area had to have a function, a good design and logical measurements. &nbsp;It began to take shape part by part.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image03.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image03-sm.jpg" width="630" height="377" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The right side as you see in the image, vertical suspended bars that can rotate and move along to close like a shutter was introduced. This meant huge vertical glass panels would come just behind them and would form the boundary at this side of the apartment. And each living area at this side will have access to those massive windows.&nbsp;</p> <p>Next the rear end had to be sorted out. If the steps go up connecting each area, wouldn&rsquo;t it be better if it did not hit a dead end, so a door was provided at the rear end. Next was to where would it open to? Since this was a huge level up comprising of all steps leading the way up, it was logical to suppose that it went up hill and maybe an upper land area could join to where the door opened. Placing the building against a hill made it fit the terrain. The couples living here can walk up to the hill through their living space.</p> <p>So now there was lots of space under those steps. Instead of assuming it to be filled with earth, a car garage could fit in there! Considering the area, there was so much space left. The area was split at left to accommodate a couple of huge trenches; that would allow trees to grow inside the apartment. A bathroom was to be included; the rear left end was vacant and it helped. The extra area at left mid was set apart for a reading area to those who are in love with dreams and books! A view from the top explains.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image04.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image04-sm.jpg" width="630" height="378" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The front end of the long hall was still blank so a big screen was introduced there. To movie lovers, with this screen in place, one can watch movies/content from anywhere inside the villa. Coming to the left side, huge glass facades looked beautiful with buildings having high ceiling. So a huge glass fa&ccedil;ade could do here, but plane glass so massive would look boring and maybe not be practical, so it was split into pieces unevenly for a change. Splitting the glass in an uneven way meant it would need special holders to hold. The branch shaped holders solved the problem. Steel wires running vertically through them reinforced the strength of the branches as seen in the image.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image05.jpg"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image05-sm.jpg" width="630" height="377" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The ceiling part of the long hall was a massive area when it came to designing the roof. It needed to look interesting from inside, so a design that was easy to make and looks great was required. While searching for references I came across Paper planes that sparked the idea of suspending false ceilings like paper planes side by side and could also embed light fixtures into it. But since the roof had to enclose the entire area which was huge, other designs had to be looked at as well. For now I left the space above the bedroom blank. The image shows the initial ceiling design for the entire hall.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image06.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image06-sm.jpg" width="630" height="351" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>While designing the ceiling the terrace also had t be considered, since both are sides of the same coin. There was lots of space on the terrace and it had to be utilized, introducing a pool solved the problem. It also came with sitting areas and other features. This is when I thought to let the pool sink in as the ceiling on top of the bedroom. The couples on bed could watch the stars on a romantic night through the pool above them!&nbsp;</p> <p>The normal rectangular pool was pretty common, so some odd shapes were under consideration; keeping in mind one should have the decent length to go for a long swim. Much iteration was done before finalizing on one. Since there was not enough space to completely sink the pool into the roof; raising it and making it look like run infinitely to all three sides was the option. See picture showing the iterations done while making the pool.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image07.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image07-sm.jpg" width="630" height="380" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The back side of the building was incomplete; also I was looking for a way to connect the interiors with the terrace and garage at bottom. This lead to introducing an elevator, that could connect all three levels. Placing the elevator bluntly just after the rear door of the long hall did not seem to be a very impressive idea. There had to be a breathing space where something can happen. The rear end of the interiors was extended. Here two new areas was introduced; the His and Her space [ that also served as dressing rooms]. A corridor right after the rear door split to left and right to her &amp; His space respectively. I believe in the idea that being partners you do require time to yourself as individuals; so this part was for that purpose. Balconies were provided at both sides. The elevator was thus placed at the rear most end and it effectively connected the three levels of the house. &nbsp;The garage came right under this. Image shows the rear end of the house with the above details.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image08.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image08-sm.jpg" width="630" height="381" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>I have prepared some 2D drawings [pans &amp; elevations] based on the final design. They are presented here for understanding the concept better. Starting with the floor plan of the living space [Interiors] see the drawings presented. Please have a detailed look.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image09.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image09-sm.jpg" width="630" height="525" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Shown Below is the floor plan of the terrace.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image10.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image10-sm.jpg" width="630" height="526" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Shown Below is the front elevation.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image11.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image11-sm.jpg" width="630" height="525" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Shown Below is the right side elevation.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image12.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image12-sm.jpg" width="630" height="525" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Shown Below is the left side elevation.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image13.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image13-sm.jpg" width="630" height="525" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Please note that, elements like the pergolas, the big trench at front etc. was done during the final stages of visualization while detailing the scene. Design is complete for the interiors, like custom cupboards, an entire dressing room set, some false partitions inside the bathroom, the steam room, a guest bathroom; a place to keep your bikes was also sorted out. Added wooden cladding at areas to make the structure interesting and several other features were added while refining it for the final views.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once the building was complete, ready to be tested in an environment I started working on the exteriors. &nbsp;Even though I wanted to do interiors; the exteriors became a priority as the views from the villa opened wide to the world outside.</p> <p>Note: kindly do not use the designs since I am looking forward to collaborate with someone who can bring this to reality.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>THE LANDSCAPE DESIGN</strong></p> <p>The concept of the house was to be situated amidst a forest. So it was time to decide what kind of forest should surround the plot? Redwood trees always inspired me and I thought of making a redwood forest around. Reference images were collected. Researched on what all kind of ground cover normally runs in a redwood forest, and the various species of plants in that environment. It was mostly clovers beds, mushrooms, dead trunks, redwood seeds, rocks scattered here and there, twigs and fallen leaves that formed a carpet on the ground [all these were just great and just what I was looking to have]. The good thing was that the ground was not densely covered with different varieties of plants as it would look too dense and chaotic. I wanted the ground to be clear, so that one can walk around into the forest. See below the references that helped me.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image14.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image14-sm.jpg" width="630" height="509" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>These are random pictures I came across while searching online. They belong to the respective owners, but as you see it is only for reference.</p> <p>The first challenge thus came up; there was no redwood tree model in my library neither did I find it online for sale anywhere so making it was the only way out! To model it, I chose Mudbox since it had a direct integration with 3Ds Max and I felt it was relatively simple and not as complex. It also has the feature that your texture resolution does not depend on your mesh count. And I needed low poly to be used in 3Ds Max; considering the fact that the scene was going to real heavy in the end. &nbsp;The work will be done by normal maps and high resolution textures.</p> <p>It took a few days to study to work with Mudbox 2011, and these free tutorials from YouTube helped! Thanks to the respective authors.</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziWLs9-clis&amp;list=PL588F2FB72B0B1EF5" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziWLs9-clis&amp;list=PL588F2FB72B0B1EF5</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJJQaQDRkG8" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJJQaQDRkG8</a></p> <p>Practice was necessary before forward with doing models for the project. Firstly the tree trunk of the redwood tree had to me made. There were 3 tall trees in the library, took out the main trunk, unwrapped it and exported it to Mudbox for modelling and texturing. I was lazy to unwrap initially, but once I figured the easy way out, it was fun to do. It seems there are some automatic unwrap plugins like polyunwrapper, UnwrellaMax, but only demo versions were available and needed purchase. I did use &ldquo;Steamroller&rdquo; which is freely available at &ldquo;Script Spot&rdquo; and does the job to an extent. So finally it was done manually using the tools in 3Ds Max.&nbsp;</p> <p>From 3 low poly base meshes 6-7 variations of tree trunks were made, that were of different heights and age. I guess I will not be going into how to use MudBox but will point out a few things. Mudbox uses layers similar to Photoshop for adding sculpt &amp; texturing details [You can have multiple layers for each map]. Diffuse maps, Specular, and Normal &amp; Bump maps will be generated in Mudbox for a given model. The image shows modelling in Mudbox step by step.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image15.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image15-sm.jpg" width="630" height="423" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Even though the final meshes have a high poly count inside Mudbox at Level 04, with around 50000 polygons per model; Level 03 was used with less than 11000 polygon per tree trunk [I could have used level 02 with 6000 polygons but level 03 was better]. Remaining details were compensated by normal bumps and the detailed textures that were used. I will cover texturing in Mudbox later in this article in another example.</p> <p>Here are a few brushes &amp; textures that were used for creating the tree trunk.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image16.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image16-sm.jpg" width="630" height="689" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The branches and leaves that came with the original model were used as they are. Only that I completely re- textured them to suit my scene. 5 variations/hue of leaves for different ages were made. Also different opacity maps were used to create the variation. Other related props like mushrooms, redwood seeds were also modelled and unwrapped. I detached some branches from the real mesh to be scattered at ground. Please see the images.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image17.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image17-sm.jpg" width="630" height="673" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image18.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image18-sm.jpg" width="630" height="255" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The 5 types of leaves were scattered at random percentages using a script called &lsquo;Random Selector&rsquo;. &nbsp;[Thanks to the maker]. You can find it at scriptspot.</p> <p>The set of branches and leaves were duplicated and rotated to place to cover the entire height of the tree. The main trunk was then attached with the branches, leaves, and mushrooms and converted it to proxy. I had to try different diffuse &amp; opacity maps and textures to refine this for the desired output. See the final few trees I used.</p> <p>Tip: I made sure to apply the same material slot to all the 6 trees. A multisub object map worked perfectly. This allowed me to change all trees [textures] scattered in my scene from a single place. See the images for details of the trees made.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image19.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image19-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image20.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image20-sm.jpg" width="630" height="454" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>SURROUNDING AREA</strong></p> <p>With the trees ready, the terrain around the plot was next in line. There were two areas to consider, one was the immediate areas to the building and the other was the forest on all sides. I made a rough boundary for the immediate area, split them into three parts; the front approach area, the backyard lawn and the front area. Patch modelling was used to model since it was easier for making curvy surfaces and the mesh was very light. &nbsp;Once I made the low poly base, it was taken to Mudbox to roughen it up a bit. Did some basic texturing in Mudbox and left it there. &nbsp;This was about getting the areas correct so that with the boundary in place, I could work on the main forest area around. The final texturing for these areas were done later using Megascans [explained later in the article]. The immediate terrain to the building is shown in the image.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image21.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image21-sm.jpg" width="630" height="470" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The surrounding forest was split into 3 meshes. Combined back and right area formed the first mesh, since most of my shots came facing this area. Also it was better that this was a single mesh for the fact that while using Multiscatter etc. I could associate it with a single entity and finish all details in a go. We will look at one area; rest two were done the same way. The image shows the entire area from top.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image22.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image22-sm.jpg" width="630" height="590" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>I started modelling the back right area first, patch modelling proved very useful. I had the boundaries of all the immediate areas correct; but the part at which the building joins with land at back was to be figured out. So the building was merged in for reference to get the boundary correct at the rear side. The base mesh thus correct to details was unwrapped and exported to Mudbox.</p> <p>More than modelling tis time; Mudbox solved the problem of texturing such a huge area which otherwise was difficult to be textured. It helped to custom paint areas correctly. From the references I collected, the ground with fallen leaves formed the major brown part; the other patches that were painted were small rocks, big rocks, ferns, and clovers, all of them in multiple layers</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image23.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image23-sm.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The textures were at 4K resolution since the area to be covered was huge 130 by 130m to be approximate. Textures of this the size would slow down the renders, but it did the job. The good thing was that it was not mixed in 3Ds max which could have slowed it down significantly I guess. Here there are only 2 maps; the diffuse &amp; bump maps, they were sufficient as the areas were at a distance</p> <p>Tip: I used Mudbox tools to paint maps to be used as masks with Multiscatter while distributing objects. &nbsp;[I made a black and white version of the respective layers using Photoshop and used them]&nbsp;</p> <p>Image shows a few of the distribution maps generated from Mudbox; which I finally used as masks. There was not much overlap of the scattered maps since I could easily see &amp; control it in Mudbox.</p> <p>The same procedure was repeated for the other two areas.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image24.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image24-sm.jpg" width="630" height="651" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Here are a few brushes that were used in Mudbox for texturing the terrain.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image25.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image25-sm.jpg" width="630" height="474" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Next was modelling the scatter objects for the forest ground. Clovers 10-12 variations were made with 3-4 hues to them; further they were attached to form small and big groups. There was one fern in the library that was re worked and made 5 variations were made from it. The random selector script proved very useful to randomly select the leaves and assign different tints/hue of leaves from the different textures prepared and kept. 3D meshes of twigs I bought from Megascans, redwood seeds, a few rocks, fallen dead tree trunks [made in Mudbox], some fallen leaves etc. were scattered using Multiscatter. See &nbsp;the image for the scatter items for the forest floor.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image26.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image26-sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p><br />Normal settings were used for Multiscatter for distributing the, only that the afore mentioned maps were used as masks to control each scatter item correctly. Also the Multiscatters were kept in groups and named to facilitate easy switching on and off according to the camera. The image shows the Multiscatters used for the forest area.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image27.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image27-sm.jpg" width="630" height="323" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The next task was modelling the huge rocks at the back of building. I started with a cube with enough segments in 3Ds Max, made a basic shape and unwrapped it. The adjacent rocks were also made similarly and took them together to Mudbox since it was a natural formation and during sculpting it was important they all merged very well with each other. There were initially around 14 rocks which formed the wall like formation. [To avoid re-work of unwrapping each of them I used same cube to make all rocks.] To avoid confusion each rock had a code that was preserved from modelling to texturing. I mainly used projection brush in Mudbox to coat each rock with multiple layers in the diffuse channel. Each rock had a base coat rock texture followed by mosses, followed by fallen leaves at top and other coats of mosses growing on it. See the image of the steps in making the rocks.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image28.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image28-sm.jpg" width="630" height="553" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Later some were substituted with meshes I bought form Megascans. Shown in the image is the textures used and final unwrap generated in Mudbox for one such rock.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image29.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image29-sm.jpg" width="630" height="413" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>BASIC LIGHTING SET UP</strong></p> <p>I used the linear workflow for this project. &nbsp;Going into details of linear work flow would make this article too long. There are plenty of tutorials out there, here are a few I referred to. Thanks to the respective authors!</p> <p><a href="https://www.3dtotal.com/tutorial/1552-linear-workflow-the-whole-shebang-3ds-max-v-ray-misc-after-effects-by-daniel-dye-render?page=1" target="_blank">https://www.3dtotal.com/tutorial/1552-linear-workflow-the-whole-shebang-3ds-max-v-ray-misc-after-effects-by-daniel-dye-render?page=1</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSwnXjADO9U" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSwnXjADO9U</a></p> <p>There is a useful script I came across to set gamma to all textures in a go. It is called Pixamoon Gamma Organizer. It is available for free at ScriptSpot.com. Just run the script and select the objects/select the whole scene and change gamma settings for the textures used. It is pretty simple.</p> <p>For lighting the scene, the V-ray Dome with an HDR loaded and V-ray Sun combination was used. I wanted soft shadows and a slightly cloudy feel to the scene. The technique used here I had learned from elsewhere earlier; credits goes to the original author. Here is link to a tutorial. Thanks to the author!</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTOHVtEyofY" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTOHVtEyofY</a></p> <p>I have included an image explaining in brief the lighting setup in my scene.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image30.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image30-sm.jpg" width="630" height="379" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Being a photographer I had used DLSR&rsquo;s and the settings works quiet the same with the Vray camera. So I used the Sunny 16 rule for setting up my camera. This rule gives you values of F-number, Shutter speed and ISO used under different conditions. You can play with the settings as you like/tweak them. I had to play around a bit to look on the final values. What I have presented here is the final settings of the scene. It is not much different from the setting I used at this point.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image31.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image31-sm.jpg" width="630" height="322" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>With everything set from what we have explained till now the image looked like this. This formed the first milestone render of the exteriors.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image32.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image32-sm.jpg" width="630" height="656" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The road you see here was textured in Mudbox similar to the other models explained earlier. Some leaves to be scattered on top to give the natural look. You can also see the big rocks, the dead trunks, the ferns, the redwood trees, the clovers, twigs etc. scattered to give the look I needed.&nbsp;</p> <p>The forest here is made of 8 textures for the ground, 40 plus scattered items on the ground, 6 trees [6 different leaves], 6 different mushrooms on the trees, 7 big rocks [6 textures per rock] and the main terrain mesh. As an addition I used multi painter to paint some bigger mosses growing on the big rocks you may notice in the image.</p> <p>Here is the terrain top view. I have marked all details and areas to completely understand the terrain I prepared. Please see in detail to understand; since this is the base image in which the areas marked will be referred to later in this article.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image33.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image33-sm.jpg" width="630" height="525" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>TEXTURING&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>As seen earlier the forest and related props were modelled &amp; textured with the help of Mudbox; the remaining areas were to be textured. [Mari is a nice and advanced texturing software you can try instead]. Next in line was the building. The building was merged into the file to see the fitting with respect to the areas that were made around it. Here is another of my early work in progress renders taken from the left side of the plot.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image34.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image34-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The rocks at this left side were bad, the grass was not at good enough, the trees in this view are the initial trial ones I made, it lacked height and did not look good as well. I understood the issues but point was it started to take shape. After correcting a few issues, the building was taken out for texturing in a separate file. I studied more about how materials were made apart from the usual way I used to texture.&nbsp;</p> <p>Any scene will have a few materials that are most commonly used. Glass, water, steel, aluminium, copper etc. are some them and mostly did not use any maps. So they were the starting point. I already knew about http://www.vray-materials.de/. I downloaded a few of them, and with my experience I tweaked the materials which I downloaded room vray-materilas.de to suit my scene. My main motive was to look for a work flow in texturing. The guys at Turbosquid provided some great help with an amazing tutorial that explains the texturing workflow. I have followed this to make almost all materials when it came to texturing of the house. My sincerest thanks to them!</p> <p><a href="https://blog.turbosquid.com/2014/05/05/turbotips-v-ray-material-part-5-workflow/" target="_blank">https://blog.turbosquid.com/2014/05/05/turbotips-v-ray-material-part-5-workflow/</a></p> <p>V-ray Dirt by the amazing artist Peter Guthrie</p> <p><a href="http://www.peterguthrie.net/blog/2009/10/vray-dirt-tutorial" target="_blank">http://www.peterguthrie.net/blog/2009/10/vray-dirt-tutorial</a></p> <p></p> <p>I used the Floor Generator script for making wooden cladding on the building and for making flooring for the different areas inside the building; using Multitexture plugin the texturing was done. Here are a few examples.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image35.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image35-sm.jpg" width="630" height="405" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image36.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image36-sm.jpg" width="630" height="413" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>I guess my experience also helped in making the materials but most of the materials were based on what I learned from great artists like Peter Guthrie, Grant Warwick etc. I am extremely thankful to them for sharing it with the community. Now the tough part was deciding which textures to be used, and the combinations. I went through lots of references which helped me a lot in finalizing them and understanding the look and finish I needed to achieve. The image shows a few references for texturing I picked up.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image37.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image37-sm.jpg" width="630" height="635" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The basic idea was that, for the building to be textured; it needed steel, aluminium and copper as metals, 4-5 types of wood materials, 3-4 concrete materials, 3-4 flooring materials, 2-3 plastic materials, a few plane surfaces &amp; water. Once they were made using the work flow shared earlier, it was easy. Having made the building myself I knew where what had to applied. Except for a few places where some research was required to make that difference! For example the pool area was one of them.</p> <p>Awesome Bump is free software that was used in the project for generating normal, displacement &amp; bump maps and it was very useful! Once the first phase of texturing was complete the house looked somewhat like this.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image38.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image38-sm.jpg" width="630" height="377" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Few refinements were done later during rendering.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image39.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image39-sm.jpg" width="630" height="238" /></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>TEXTURING OF THE IMMEDIATE AREAS TO THE HOUSE</strong></p> <p>The immediate areas as discussed earlier lying next to the house are; namely the backyard, the right side road and mounts &amp; the area directly at front of the house. [Please refer to the earlier image]. Basic texturing was done in Mudbox but it was not so great; since these areas came very close to the camera, and they needed to look best. I had to find a new way to texture them that Is when I came across Quixel Megascans.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>QUIXEL MEGASCANS</strong></p> <p>They mainly have two things to offer; one is scanned 3D models from the real world; like rocks, tree trunks, stones etc. with maps for all channels. The other thing was scanned textures of surfaces like stone, concrete, grass, earth, pebbles, a vast library to select from.&nbsp;</p> <p>With a month&rsquo;s subscription textures and 3D meshes were carefully selected and downloaded. Here for the pebble floor 5 textures were mixed. Starting with the earth/soil, followed by pebbles, grass, some sediments/dirt, and some mud. I choose a 6 by 6 metre surface to work with in the Megascan Studio. Settings in this software allow mixing multiple maps as you want and creating varied maps. The image shows step by step creation of the texture that could be ultimately mapped on a 6 by 6 m surface, note you will have to play with the settings to make it look seamless. Each texture has its own individual size in metres. It worked pretty good for me.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image40.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image40-sm.jpg" width="630" height="512" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The 3d scanned models did a great job in bringing the scene together. The only thing I wished they had is a separate license for the software; once the subscription ends no new custom maps can be made, you can still continue to use the 3D models which can be directly exported to your favourite 3d program through Megascan Bridge. In the image below you can find a few 3D scanned models and textured surfaces.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image41.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image41-sm.jpg" width="630" height="509" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>GATHERING MORE MODELS</strong></p> <p>There was a still lot of empty space left in the scene that needed to be filled with plants, furniture to be placed and they had to be carefully selected. Before purchased I had to think if they would suit a particular area, and possibly use them at multiple areas to save money. &nbsp;I got some free quality models from sites like 3D Sky, Ronen, AXYZ, Vargov 3D, textures from Wild Textures etc. I am extremely thankful them. In any case a lot of re-texturing/ sometimes re-modelling &amp; mixing was done to make it suitable for the scene.&nbsp;</p> <p>A few custom elements were modelled, like the front and back pergola with ivy, the water curtain &amp; the pool etc. IVY Generator was used for making the IVY on the pergola &amp; roses climbing up on the building. Let&rsquo;s look at the pergola with ivy first.</p> <p>First of all the frame of the pergola was designed. With Ivy Generator to make the ivy grow the way I wanted it was slightly difficult; since the frame of the pergola was bars and you need a flat surface for the ivy to spread properly. To solve this, surfaces were created in the shape of the frame using patch modelling; and then used IVY Generator on that surface to form the branches. I used a copy of the surface, which was re-modelled here and there to distribute flowers hanging from them and controlled it separately. 20-25 different IVY&rsquo;s braches were made to completely fill the pergola. Once the branches/roots were made, they were attached together and Multiscatter was used to distribute the leaves in bunches on it.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image42.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image42-sm.jpg" width="630" height="526" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The roses climbing up the building was done in a similar way; only that the IVY Generator was used to distribute the meshes and leaves. It is more of a trial and error using the IVY Generator till you achieve. Image shows settings and a few meshes made using the Ivy Generator.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image43.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image43-sm.jpg" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Image shows a few other detailed meshes that were made with Mudbox and Realflow. I managed to make the water curtain and pool flowing out, in Realflow. I do not have much expertise in Realflow so I guess I cannot explain much in detail about it here.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image44.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image44-sm.jpg" width="630" height="399" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The area around the entry to car garage was modelled in Mudbox to give the rock finish. The terrace wooden plank floor was made manually using splines to get the detail required. A lot of ivy/creepers were made with IVY Generator with custom meshes scattered and can be seen distributed at many places in the scene. Also there are many models were created for interiors which is not covered in this article. I look forward to use them in my next part of this project.</p> <p>Following image shows a work in progress using the above mentioned assets.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image45.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image45-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>A different design was done for the pergola at the pool rear end. Leaves were scattered on terrace and the pool surface. The trenches / planters were filled with shrubs, dirt, and other ground covers with Multiscatter.<br /><br /><br /></p> <p><strong>FILE OPTIMIZATION</strong></p> <p>This topic actually finds its roots right from the start of the project; and in fact it should have been talked about earlier as I kept on doing it from time to time to hold the file together. Here are a few things that was maintained from the start.</p> <p>Mostly very object in my scene is named and has a code for similar objects/groups to facilitate easy selection. Importantly the layer system was used to classify all the objects in the scene. &nbsp;Almost all important objects have an ID that was set manually. The complex meshes were converted to proxies; instances were used at all possible places. Texture sizes [I have used some crazy hi resolution sizes] were optimized. Scene is properly asset tracked &amp; checked for un-used, stray objects and unwanted maps cleared. The main file came around 110 MB containing all shots. Most importantly it is about knowing every nook and corner of your file. Each element was developed and tested in a different file before bringing it into the main file. Yes it handles well and good in the viewport. The image shows the screen grab of the viewport.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image46.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image46-sm.jpg" width="630" height="392" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>RENDERING</strong></p> <p>Having done a lot of detailing, I was looking forward to render as many views as possible. I had set some cameras while taking out the test shots which were fine-tuned to form my final frames. The test renders for each shot revealed things that had to be to fixed. There was not going on, apart from a few tweaks I did changing angles, fine tuning textures, &nbsp;adding a planter here and there etc. till I found things were good to go and I hit the high resolution render.</p> <p>The lighting and camera settings I used are as explained earlier in this article. Not many changes were made except rotating the sun to compliment to the camera angle I was working on. Since there are many shots I will share a couple of them showing the final images work in progress.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image47.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image47-sm.jpg" width="630" height="571" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>There were 12 main renders; I managed to contain all the cameras in a single file with all the improvements happening for each view incrementally saved.</p> <p>The image shows some settings used. [It is similar to the earlier settings shared in this article]</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image48.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image48-sm.jpg" width="630" height="409" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>The render times were on an average of 8 hours for 3000 X 2500 frame with V-ray 2.4 and 3dsMax 2014. I know it is quiet high; but there are a lot of maps used most of them at 2K resolution, some at 4K along with displacement maps used on the ground everywhere. There were some system issues I faced so had to compromise a bit here and there. Both 8 bit and 32 bit images were saved as output. The editing was done in Photoshop.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>EDITTING</strong></p> <p>The raw renders looked fairly decent except the grass and background trees that were changed in many renders. Rest were mostly curve &amp; level corrections. I did not use any extra plugins or anything. Mainly I had object ID&rsquo;s with which I selected those objects that required correction; applied the corrections using a mask. In some cases like the main building wall I used some grunge textures in suitable mode to give some more dirt feel to it. Some dirt was also painted at places. Vray Lighting, reflection and refraction passes were mainly used, set to screen mode at the required opacity. Vignette layer and photo filters were also used to give the final touch to the image. The image shows a couple of renders before and after editing. Since it contains many layers of edit, not sure how useful the screen grabs would prove.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image49.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image49-sm.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image50.jpg"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image50-sm.jpg" width="630" height="431" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>I guess more editing is possible; in terms of adding more drama or by using plugins and other effects. But I did not want them to be very dramatic, since the purpose was more about showing the details &amp; design clearly. I do admit that I could have tried different lighting moods etc. but then, having spent months on the project and with so many renders at hand I chose to do it at a later time. Really looking forward to do a night shot of the scene and publish it along with the second part of the project that focuses on the interiors.&nbsp;</p> <p>I do want to add one thing here; as I was not satisfied with the 3D trees, in the final edits I choose to use images for the background trees in a few renders; meaning there were multiple versions to most of the images. Here are a couple of them.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image51.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image51-sm.jpg" width="630" height="746" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image52.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image52-sm.jpg" width="630" height="312" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>There were 14 renders including 2 DOF shots and 2 Cross sectional shots. So here the image shows the camera positions from where they were taken.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image53.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image53-sm.jpg" width="630" height="380" /></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>FINAL RENDERS</strong></p> <p>01 RIGHT SIDE VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image54.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image54-sm.jpg" width="630" height="537" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>02 RIGHT SIDE VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image55.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image55-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>03 RIGHT SIDE SECTIONAL VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image56.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image56-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>04 FRONT PERGOLA</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image57.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image57-sm.jpg" width="630" height="364" /></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>05 THE COUPLES</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image58.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image58-sm.jpg" width="630" height="536" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>06 HIS BALCONY</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image59.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image59-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>07 LEFT SIDE VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image60.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image60-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>08 LEFT SIDE SECTIONAL VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image61.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image61-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>09 PIANO ROOMS</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image62.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image62-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>10 LEFT SIDE EXTERIOR SITTING AREA</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image63.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image63-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>11 POOL VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image64.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image64-sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>12 TERRACE SITTING AREA</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image65.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image65-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>13 POOL VIEW</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image66.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image66-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>14 THE STEPS</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image67.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image67-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>15 RIGHT SIDE SECTIONAL INFORMATION</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image68.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image68-sm.jpg" width="630" height="340" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>16 RIGHT SIDE SECTIONAL INFORMATION</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image69.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_05/image69-sm.jpg" width="630" height="340" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>CONCLUSION</strong></p> <p>Due to the length of the article I could not include many more things; apologies if I have missed any part. Thank you for having the patience to go through my project and its making. I sincerely hope this has been of value and worth the time.&nbsp;</p> <p>I am extremely thankful to Jeff Mottle for giving me the opportunity to publish &lsquo;The making&rsquo; of the project &lsquo;The Step&rsquo; through CG Architect. I am also thankful to all the artists and people who have shared their knowledge and expertise; because of which I could reach this far. To all the people who has inspired &amp; supported me, and a mighty thanks to God almighty.</p> <p></p> <p>Please write to me at aswing111@gmail.com, if there is anything particular you would like to know or contact me about.</p> <p>Visit my profile at</p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/aswin-g-aa30a59%20" target="_blank">https://www.linkedin.com/in/aswin-g-aa30a59&nbsp;</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.aswins.com" target="_blank">www.aswins.com</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.behance.net/aswing303" target="_blank">https://www.behance.net/aswing303</a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>SOFTWARE USED</strong></p> <p>AUTODESK 3DS MAX, MUDBOX, V-RAY, ADOBE PHOTOHSOP CC, QUIXEL MEGASCANS</p> <p></p> <p>NOTE* I will cover the interiors in detail in my next project hopefully with a lot of interesting stuff added! As you can see the structure is ready to bring in the interiors. I believe it deserves its own time to make. The design so far has been really a lot of thought and effort and I am happy that it all fit together and came out well and quiet practical. It is my dream that this can be made if someone approaches me to get it done in the real world and I can probably look at getting a new job profile.</p>Thu, 18 May 2017 14:37:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137636.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/the-making-of-the-stepFine Art Friday - Vol. 3Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-3"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137481.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p style="border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 1em; font-size: 12px; color: #333333; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-weight: normal;">With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of works in the public domain. Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature?&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank" style="border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; color: #646464;">Let us know</a>!<br />&nbsp;</p> <h1>Creative Lighting&nbsp;</h1> <p>The following Creative Lighting Breakdown was sent to us by Nikos Nikolopoulos founder at <a href="https://www.creativelighting.co/">Creatlive Lighting</a>. For several years, Nikos worked at Cityscape Digital as their lead 3d artist and then following on as CGI director. Eventually the call of the homeland grew too strong, but Nikos and Cityscape were like family too and did not want to part company. Instead they forged a new concept together, <a href="http://creativelighting.co" target="_blank">creativelighting.co</a>, a vision for CG driven by the philosophies of cinematic lighting. Below Nikos speak briefly about a few of his favourite pieces from the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en" target="_blank">Rijksmuseum</a>&nbsp;in Amsterdam.<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Chasing_Beauty_36.jpg" target="_blank"><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Chasing_Beauty_36-sm.jpg" width="630" height="357" /></a><br /><br />Chasing Beauty - Image 1<br /><br /><br /><br />There are many ways you can use the light creatively to tell a story and your inspiration should come from everywhere. Today I would like to focus into paintings and study the masters of light and dark like Rembrandt and Caravaggio. There is so much to learn when you analyse paintings about lighting, composition, colour, tone and message. Always make time when you travel to visit a museum, art gallery or photography exhibition. Study your masters live is a unique experience and I believe that real world inspiration is so much better that technical knowledge.</p> <p>I&rsquo;m very inspired from Caravaggio and the great use of light on his paintings. If you study The Calling of Saint Matthew you will see how the artist's use of light and shadow adds drama to the painting as well as giving the figures a quality of immediacy. The lighting is directional, very sharp with hard shadows. That helps the figures to stand out and the strong directionality of the light guides the eye and unifies the composition. Everything important is hit by sunlight and the rest falls into shadow and doesn&rsquo;t distract the eye.<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Caravaggio_The_Calling_of_Saint_Matthew.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Caravaggio_The_Calling_of_Saint_Matthew-sm.jpg" width="630" height="647" /></a>&nbsp;<br /><br />Title: The Calling of Saint Mathew<br />Artist: Caravaggio<br />Year: 1599&ndash;1600<br />Medium: Oil on canvas<br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <p>The first time I visited the <a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en" target="_blank">Rijksmuseum</a> in Amsterdam I spent a lot of time studying The Night Watch, one of the most famous paintings of Rembrandt and probably the most famous painting in the Netherlands. I think the idea is not to go around the museum and see as many paintings as possible, you should know your masters and spend some time seeing their best work and try to understand their techniques and art. <br /><br />It is a group portrait like the painting on the right from Frans Hals (See Chasing Beauty image 2 below). Both paintings have great composition but I realized that I care less about the second painting since the light is even on the faces and there is equal attention to all faces compared to Rembrandt who decided to have a narrative and hierarchy on the lighting, which is the key ingredient to Imagemaking and storytelling. There is a great movement and attention to detail. The more time you spend with the painting the more things you see and understand. Rembrandt wanted us to look first on the two men on the foreground and clearly they are the most important figures. Check out the captain&rsquo;s hand casting shadow from the sunlight on the beautiful uniform. <br /><br />I do recommend you to visit the Rijksmuseum on your next trip to Amsterdam.<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Rembrandt_The_Night_Watch.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Rembrandt_The_Night_Watch-sm.jpg" width="630" height="512" /></a><br /><br />Title: The Night Watch<br />Artist: Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn<br />Year: 1642 <br />Medium: Oil on canvas<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Chasing_Beauty_20.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Chasing_Beauty_20-sm.jpg" width="630" height="357" /></a><br /><br />Chasing Beauty - Image 2 (Left: The Night Watch/Rembrandt, Top Right: DeFrans Hals/magere compagnie)<br /><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Frans_Hals_De_Magere_Compagnie.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Frans_Hals_De_Magere_Compagnie-sm.jpg" width="630" height="297" /></a></p> <div><br />Title: De magere compagnie<br />Artist: Frans Hals<br />Year: 1633-1637&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas<br /><br /><br /><strong></strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div></div> <h1>Hudson River School</h1> <p><strong></strong><br /><br />Thank you to Claudio Nunez at Architecte OAQ for suggesting that we feature some of the works from the Hudson River School. &nbsp;<br /><br />"The Hudson River School was a mid-19th century American art movement embodied by a group of landscape painters whose aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism. The paintings for which the movement is named depict the Hudson River Valley and the surrounding area, including the Catskill, Adirondack, and the White Mountains; eventually works by the second generation of artists associated with the school expanded to include other locales in New England, the Maritimes, the American West, and South America." - <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hudson_River_School" target="_blank">Hudson River School&nbsp;Wikipedia</a><br /><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Albert_Bierstadt_-_Rocky_Mountain_Landscape_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Albert_Bierstadt_-_Rocky_Mountain_Landscape_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="424" /></a><br /><br />Title: Rocky Mountain Landscape<br />Artist: Albert Bierstadt <br />Year: 1870&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p>&nbsp;<br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Albert_Bierstadt_-_Among_the_Sierra_Nevada_California_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Albert_Bierstadt_-_Among_the_Sierra_Nevada_California_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="377" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p>Title: Among the Sierra Nevada, California<br />Artist: Albert Bierstadt&nbsp;<br />Year: 1868&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas<br /><br /><br />&nbsp;<a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Parthenon_1871_Frederic_Edwin_Church.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Parthenon_1871_Frederic_Edwin_Church-sm.jpg" width="630" height="387" /></a></p> <p>Title: The Parthenon&nbsp;<br />Artist: Frederic Edwin Church <br />Year: 1871 <br />Medium: Oil on canvas&nbsp;<br /><br /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/El_Khasne_Petra-sm.jpg" width="630" height="794" /><br /><br />Title: El Khasne Petra&nbsp;<br />Artist: Frederic Edwin Church&nbsp;<br />Year: 1874&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas <br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Church_Frederick_Edwin_Jerusalem_from_the_Mount_of_Olives.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Church_Frederick_Edwin_Jerusalem_from_the_Mount_of_Olives-sm.jpg" width="630" height="405" /></a><br /><br />Title: Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives <br />Artist: Frederic Edwin Church <br />Year: 1870&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas&nbsp;<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/The_Course_of_Empire_Consummation_Thomas_Cole_1835_1836.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/The_Course_of_Empire_Consummation_Thomas_Cole_1835_1836-sm.jpg" width="630" height="428" /></a><br /><br />Title: The Course of Empire: Consummation<br />Artist: Thomas Cole&nbsp;<br />Year: 1835-1836&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas&nbsp;<br /><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Home_in_the_Woods_1847_Thomas_Cole.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol3/Home_in_the_Woods_1847_Thomas_Cole-sm.jpg" width="630" height="416" /></a><br /><br />Title: Home in the Woods<br />Artist: Thomas Cole&nbsp;<br />Year: 1847&nbsp;<br />Medium: Oil on canvas &nbsp;<br /><br /><br /></p>Fri, 12 May 2017 02:38:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137481.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-3RebusFarm Business in Arch Viz. Vol. 1Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/business-in-arch-viz-vol-1"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137427.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/BusinessInArchViz/BusinessInArchViz-Header-white.jpg" width="630" height="200" /><br /><br /><br /><br /></a>Welcome to the first installment of our new <a style="color: #f41837;" href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank">RebusFarm</a> Business in Arch Viz series. &nbsp;Over the next year we will be featuring two articles every month. Each new article will discuss the business side of working in and running businesses in the visualization industry. &nbsp;We will feature articles from some of the top studios in the world and have in-depth answers to questions that every studio and artist in the industry should know. &nbsp;<br /><br />The goal of this series is to provide a long-term resource for not only new artists and business owners entering the industry, but also long-time industry veterans. &nbsp;The topics will range from contracts and IT infrastructure to hiring and business strategy.<br /><br />Studios participating in this series include: 2G Studio, ArX Solutions, Beauty and the Bit, Cityscape, DBOX, Designstor, Digit Group, Inc., Factory Fifteen, Kilograph, Luxigon, MIR, Neoscape, Public Square, Steelblue, The Neighbourhood, Transparent House, Urbansimulations and many more. Collectively these companies generate hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue, and have decades of experience running some of the most successful businesses in the industry.<br /><br />The first two articles in the series will feature interesting business-related highlights from our last CGarchitect industry survey. &nbsp;<br /><br />We hope you enjoy the series!<br /><br />We would like to also like to sincerely thank <a style="color: #f41837;" href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank">RebusFarm</a> for supporting this series. Through their support they are helping better our industry and contribute significantly to future generations of visualization businesses in our field. If you are looking for one of the best rendering farm companies in the world, we highly recommend checking them out <a style="color: #f41837;" href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank">here</a><br /><a href="https://rebusfarm.net?utm_source=cgarchitect.com&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=banner630x200" target="_blank"><br /></a> <br /><br /></p> <script id="infogram_0_business_in_arch_viz_vol_1" title="Business in Arch Viz Vol. 1" src="http://e.infogr.am/js/dist/embed.js?dQ3" type="text/javascript"></script> <div style="padding: 8px 0; font-family: Arial!important; font-size: 13px!important; line-height: 15px!important; text-align: center; border-top: 1px solid #dadada; margin: 0 30px;"><a href="https://infogr.am/business_in_arch_viz_vol_1" style="color: #989898!important; text-decoration: none!important;" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Business in Arch Viz Vol. 1</a><br /><br /></div> <!-- Begin - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) --> <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 78; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); var wd = window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth; if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=58646&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime + '&amp;wd=' + wd + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // ]]></script> <!-- End - Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Business in Arch Viz (RebusFarm) -->Wed, 10 May 2017 02:01:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137427.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/business-in-arch-viz-vol-1Fine Art Friday - Vol. 2Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-2"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137292.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of works in the public domain. Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature?&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank">Let us know</a>!</p> <p>If you want hands on training to really get your creative juices flowing, we highly&nbsp;<span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">recommend</span>&nbsp;the excellent work being done by Nikos Nikolopoulos and Damien Fennell at&nbsp;<a href="https://www.creativelighting.co/" target="_blank">Creative Lighting</a>. They have regular online and live training that has amazing feedback. Hands down the best inspirational classes you can find in architectural visualization.<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_Isaacksz._van_Ruisdael_-_Winter_Landscape_-_WGA20516.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_Isaacksz._van_Ruisdael_-_Winter_Landscape_-_WGA20516-sm.jpg" width="630" height="434" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Winter Landscape<br />Artist: Jacob van Ruisdael<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: circa 1670</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Antichina_piranese.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Antichina_piranese-sm.jpg" width="630" height="400" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Appian Way<br />Artist: Giovanni Battista Piranesi<br />Medium: Etching<br />Date: 1756</p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Berkheyde-Haarlem.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Berkheyde-Haarlem-sm.jpg" width="630" height="486" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Gerrit Adriaenszoon Berckheyde<br />Artist: Jules Victor G&eacute;nisson<br />Medium: Painting<br />Date: 1696</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Giovanni_Battista_Piranesi_Ponte_Salario_Engraving.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Giovanni_Battista_Piranesi_Ponte_Salario_Engraving-sm.jpg" width="630" height="422" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Ponte Salario<br />Artist: Giovanni Battista Piranesi<br />Medium:<br />Date: 1754&ndash;1760</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Interior_da_Catedral_de_Amiens_by_Jules_Victor_Genisson_1842.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Interior_da_Catedral_de_Amiens_by_Jules_Victor_Genisson_1842-sm.jpg" width="630" height="839" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Interior of the Cathedral of Amiens<br />Artist: Jules Victor G&eacute;nisson<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: 1842</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_Isaacksz._van_Ruisdael_-_The_Windmill_at_Wijk_bij_Duurstede_detail_-_WGA20514.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_Isaacksz._van_Ruisdael_-_The_Windmill_at_Wijk_bij_Duurstede_detail_-_WGA20514-sm.jpg" width="630" height="671" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Winter Landscape<br />Artist: Jacob van Ruisdael<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: circa 1670</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_van_Ruisdael_-_River_Landscape_with_a_Castle_on_a_High_Cliff_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_van_Ruisdael_-_River_Landscape_with_a_Castle_on_a_High_Cliff_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="509" /></a><br /><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: River Landscape with a Castle on a High Cliff<br />Artist: Jacob van Ruysdael<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: 1670/1679</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_van_Ruysdael_Hogesluis_Amstel_002.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Jacob_van_Ruysdael_Hogesluis_Amstel_002-sm.jpg" width="630" height="495" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: <br />Artist: Jacob van Ruysdael<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: 1671-1681</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_-_Dedham_Lock_and_Mill_-_WGA5186.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_-_Dedham_Lock_and_Mill_-_WGA5186-sm.jpg" width="630" height="475" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Dedham Lock and Mill<br />Artist: John ConstableMedium: Oil on Canvas</p> <p class="p1">Date: circa 1818</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_-_Salisbury_Cathedral_from_the_Bishops_Garden_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_-_Salisbury_Cathedral_from_the_Bishops_Garden_-_Google_Art_Project-sm.jpg" width="630" height="498" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop's Grounds<br />Artist: John Constable<br />Medium: Etching<br />Date: 1823</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_023.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_023-sm.jpg" width="630" height="443" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Schleuse und M&uuml;hle in Dedham (Dedham Mill)<br />Artist: John Constable<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: 1820</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_Golding_Constables_Flower_Garden.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/John_Constable_Golding_Constables_Flower_Garden-sm.jpg" width="630" height="378" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Golding Constable's Flower Garden<br />Artist: John Constable<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: circa 1815</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Joos_de_Momper_the_younger_-_Winter_Landscape_-_Walters_37363.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Joos_de_Momper_the_younger_-_Winter_Landscape_-_Walters_37363-sm.jpg" width="630" height="435" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Winter Landscape<br />Artist: Joos de Momper<br />Medium: Oil on Panel<br />Date: circa between 1620 and 1629 (Baroque)</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Landscape_with_a_Windmill_oil_on_wood_painting_by_Jacob_van_Ruisdael_1646.JPG" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Landscape_with_a_Windmill_oil_on_wood_painting_by_Jacob_van_Ruisdael_1646-sm.jpg" width="630" height="434" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Landscape with a Windmill<br />Artist: Jacob van Ruysdael<br />Medium: Oil on Panel<br />Date: 1646</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Momper_Mountainous_Landscape.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Momper_Mountainous_Landscape-sm.jpg" width="630" height="395" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: A mountainous landscape with horsemen and travellers crossing a bridge.<br />Artist: Joos de Momper<br />Medium: Oil on Panel<br />Date:&nbsp;</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Piranesi-16024.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Piranesi-16024-sm.jpg" width="630" height="470" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop's Grounds<br />Artist: John Constable<br />Medium: Etching<br />Date: 1823</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Piranesi-16025.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Piranesi-16025-sm.jpg" width="630" height="469" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Veduta della Piazza del Popolo<br />Artist: Giovanni Battista Piranesi<br />Medium: Etching<br />Date: 1748-1774</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Robert_Hubert_-_Ancient_Ruins_Used_as_Public_Baths_-_1798.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Robert_Hubert_-_Ancient_Ruins_Used_as_Public_Baths_-_1798-sm.jpg" width="630" height="431" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Ancient Ruins Used as Public Baths<br />Artist: Hubert Robert<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: 1798</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Salomon_van_Ruysdael_-_After_the_Rain_-_WGA20560.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Salomon_van_Ruysdael_-_After_the_Rain_-_WGA20560-sm.jpg" width="630" height="406" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: After the Rain<br />Artist: Salomon van Ruysdael<br />Medium: Oil on Panel<br />Date: 1631</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Veduta_interna_del_Panteon_vulgarmente_detto_-_Giovanni_Battista_Piranesi.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Veduta_interna_del_Panteon_vulgarmente_detto_-_Giovanni_Battista_Piranesi-sm.jpg" width="630" height="451" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Veduta interna del Panteon vulgarmente detto<br />Artist: Giovanni Battista Piranesi<br />Medium:<br />Date:</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Viviano_Codazzi_-_Courtyard_of_an_Inn_with_Classical_Ruins_-_Walters_371851.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Viviano_Codazzi_-_Courtyard_of_an_Inn_with_Classical_Ruins_-_Walters_371851-sm.jpg" width="630" height="536" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Courtyard of an inn with classical ruins<br />Artist: Viviano Codazzi<br />Medium: Oil on Canvas<br />Date: circa 1621 and circa 1647 (Baroque)</p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Winter_Landscape_-_Joose_de_Momper_II_the_Younger_-_Google_Cultural_Institute.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol2/Winter_Landscape_-_Joose_de_Momper_II_the_Younger_-_Google_Cultural_Institute-sm.jpg" width="630" height="448" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Title: Winter Landscape<br />Artist: Joos de Momper<br />Medium: Oil on Panel<br />Date: circa between 1620 and 1629 (Baroque)</p> <p><br />&nbsp;</p>Fri, 05 May 2017 00:01:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/05/137292.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/05/fine-art-friday---vol-2Fine Art Friday - Vol. 1Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/04/fine-art-friday---vol-1"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/04/137120.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of works from the The <a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en" target="_blank">Rijksmuseum</a>&nbsp;collection. Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature?&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank">Let us know</a>!</p> <p>If you want hands on training to really get your creative juices flowing, we highly&nbsp;<span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">recommend</span>&nbsp;the excellent work being done by Nikos Nikolopoulos and Damien Fennell at&nbsp;<a href="https://www.creativelighting.co/" target="_blank">Creative Lighting</a>. They have regular online and live training that has amazing feedback. Hands down the best inspirational classes you can find in architectural visualization.</p> <div></div> <p><br /><br /></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1058.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1058-sm.jpg" width="630" height="511" /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Gulf of Naples with the Island of Ischia in the Distance<br />The Gulf of Naples, with the Island Ischia in the Background<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Josephus+Augustus+Knip&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Josephus Augustus Knip<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1818<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1058" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1058</a></p> <p class="p2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1058"><br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1161.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1161-sm.jpg" width="630" height="483" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1058"><br /></a></p> <p class="p1"><br />Slijpsteenmarkt (Whetstone Market) in Amsterdam with the Building 'Het Zeerecht' in Winter (The Slypsteenen at Amsterdam)<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=George+Pieter+Westenberg&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">George Pieter Westenberg<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1817<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1161" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1161</a></p> <p class="p2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1161" target="_blank"><br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1320.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1320-sm.jpg" width="630" height="317" /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1320.jpg" target="_blank"></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1161" target="_blank"><br /></a></p> <p class="p1"><br />Ice-skating in a Village<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Hendrick+Avercamp&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Hendrick Avercamp<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: c. 1610<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1320" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1320</a></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"></p> <p class="p2"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1368.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1368-sm.jpg" width="630" height="494" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">The Gevangenpoort and the Plaats, The Hague<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Pieter+Daniel+van+der+Burgh&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Pieter Daniel van der Burgh<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: 1825 - 1860<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1368" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1368</a></p> <p class="p2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1368"><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1505.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-1505-sm.jpg" width="630" height="980" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1368"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">A Windmill on a Polder Waterway, Known as &lsquo;In the Month of July&rsquo;<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Paul+Joseph+Constantin+Gabri%c3%abl&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Paul Joseph Constantin Gabri&euml;l<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: c. 1889<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1505" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1505</a></p> <p class="p2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-1505"><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-2830.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-2830-sm.jpg" width="630" height="459" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Artist: <a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Jan+Weissenbruch&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank"><span class="s2">Jan Weissenbruch</span></a>&nbsp;<br /></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: c. 1860 - c. 1880<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2830" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2830</a></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><span class="s3"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2830"><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-2860.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-2860-sm.jpg" width="630" height="775" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2830"><br /><br /></a></span></span></p> <p class="p1">View of Houses in Delft, Known as The Little Street<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Johannes+Vermeer&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Johannes Vermeer<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: c. 1658<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2860" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2860<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-290.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-290-sm.jpg" width="630" height="493" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2860"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">River view in the winter<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Aert+van+der+Neer&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Aert van der Neer<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: 1655 - 1660<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-290" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-290<br /><br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3162.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3162-sm.jpg" width="630" height="413" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-290"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Landscape / Souvenir of Les Landes<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Camille+Corot&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Camille Corot<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: c. 1872<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3162" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3162<br /><br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3384.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3384-sm.jpg" width="630" height="482" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3162"><br /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Entrance to the Grand Canal near the Punta della Dogana and Santa Maria della Salute<br />Artist: <a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Canaletto&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank"><span class="s1">Canaletto</span></a>&nbsp;<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1730 - 1745<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3384" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3384<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3385.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3385-sm.jpg" width="630" height="473" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3384"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Grand Canal with the Rialto Bridge and the Fondaco dei Tedeschi<br />Artist: <a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Canaletto&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank"><span class="s1">Canaletto</span></a>&nbsp;<br />Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1707 - 1750<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3385" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3385<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-359.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-359-sm.jpg" width="630" height="1080" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3385"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Interior of the Church of St Bavo in Haarlem<br />Interior of the St Bavokerk in Haarlem, seen from the south ambulatory, looking across the choir to the north ambulatory<br />and the large organ<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Pieter+Jansz.+Saenredam&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Pieter Jansz. Saenredam<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: 1636<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-359" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-359<br /><br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3922.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-3922-sm.jpg" width="630" height="455" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-359"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Charles+Leickert&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Charles Leickert<br /></a></span></span><span style="color: #454545;">Medium: oil on canvas<br /></span><span style="color: #454545;">Date: 1850<br /></span><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3922" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3922<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4118.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4118-sm.jpg" width="630" height="353" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3922"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">River Landscape with Riders<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Aelbert+Cuyp&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Aelbert Cuyp<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1653 - 1657<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4118" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4118<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4134.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4134-sm.jpg" width="630" height="438" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4118"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">View of the Church of Sloten in the Winter<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Jan+Abrahamsz.+Beerstraten&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Jan Abrahamsz. Beerstraten<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1640 - 1666<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4134" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4134<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4688.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4688-sm.jpg" width="630" height="456" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4134"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Italian Landscape with Umbrella Pines<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Hendrik+Voogd&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Hendrik Voogd<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1807<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4688" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4688</a></p> <p class="p1"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3385"> <br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4870.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4870-sm.jpg" width="630" height="377" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3385"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">View of The Hague from the Delftse Vaart in the Seventeenth Century<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Cornelis+Springer&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Cornelis Springer<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1852<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4870" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4870</a></p> <p class="p1"></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4934.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-4934-sm.jpg" width="630" height="521" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">The Quay de Paris in Rouen<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Johannes+Bosboom&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Johannes Bosboom<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1839<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4934" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4934<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-5003.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-5003-sm.jpg" width="630" height="454" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-4934"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">View of the Golden Bend in the Herengracht<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Gerrit+Adriaensz.+Berckheyde&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Gerrit Adriaensz. Berckheyde<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: 1671 - 1672<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-5003" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-5003<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-606.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-606-sm.jpg" width="630" height="365" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-5003"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Disbanding of the 'Waardgelders' (Mercenaries in the Pay of the Town Government) by Prince Maurits in Utrecht, 31<br />July 1618<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Joost+Cornelisz.+Droochsloot&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Joost Cornelisz. Droochsloot<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1625<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-606" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-606<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-858.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-858-sm.jpg" width="630" height="832" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-606"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Transept of the Mariakerk in Utrecht, seen from the Northeast<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Pieter+Jansz.+Saenredam&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Pieter Jansz. Saenredam<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: 1637<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-858" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-858<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-942.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-A-942-sm.jpg" width="630" height="773" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-858"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Gevangenpoort, The Hague<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Johannes+Adrianus+van+der+Drift&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Johannes Adrianus van der Drift<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on panel<br />Date: 1820 - 1830<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-942" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-942<br /><br /></a><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-C-165.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/vol1/SK-C-165-sm.jpg" width="630" height="522" /></a><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-942"><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Winter Landscape<br />Artist: <span class="s2"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/search?p=1&amp;ps=12&amp;involvedMaker=Barend+Cornelis+Koekkoek&amp;st=OBJECTS" target="_blank">Barend Cornelis Koekkoek<br /></a></span>Medium: oil on canvas<br />Date: 1835 - 1838<br /><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-C-165" target="_blank">https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-C-165</a></p> <p class="p1"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-942"> <br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1"><a href="https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3385"> <br /></a></p>Thu, 27 Apr 2017 21:56:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/04/137120.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/04/fine-art-friday---vol-1Coming This Week - Fine Art FridayJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/04/coming-this-week---fine-art-friday"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/04/137041.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>With so much focus on the technical side of of visualization, we want to bring some much needed attention back to the roots of our industry. Every Friday we'll be posting a series of paintings, photographs and traditional illustrations to showcase lighting, composition and mood to help inspire your digital visualizations. Below you'll find a selection of works from the The Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection. Do you have a favourite non-digital artist you think we should feature? <a href="mailto:jmottle@cgarchitect.com?subject=Fine%20Art%20Friday" target="_blank">Let us know</a>!</p> <p>If you want hands on training to really get your creative juices flowing, we highly&nbsp;<span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">recommend</span>&nbsp;the excellent work being done by Nikos Nikolopoulos and Damien Fennell at <a href="https://www.creativelighting.co/" target="_blank">Creative Lighting</a>. They have regular online and live training that has amazing feedback. Hands down the best inspirational classes you can find in architectural visualization.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DT279386.jpg" target="_blank"><br /><br /><br /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DT279386-sm.jpg" width="630" height="460" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Mill of Montmartre<br /> Artist: Georges Michel (French, Paris 1763&ndash;1843 Paris)<br /> Date: probably ca. 1820<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437080" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437080</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP169568.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP169568-sm.jpg" width="630" height="470" /></a><br /><br /></p> <p class="p1">Venice, from the Porch of Madonna della Salute<br />Artist: Joseph Mallord William Turner (British, London 1775&ndash;1851 London)<br />Date: ca. 1835<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437853" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437853</span></a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/ep16.148.3.bw.R.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/ep16.148.3.bw.R-sm.jpg" width="630" height="485" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Italian Garden<br /> Artist: Friedrich August von Kaulbach (German, Munich 1850&ndash;1920 Ohlstadt bei Murnau)<br /> Date: 1894<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436814" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436814</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/8742.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/8742-sm.jpg" width="630" height="960" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Gathering Olives at Tivoli<br />Artist: JFran&ccedil;ois-Louis Fran&ccedil;ais (French, Plombi&egrave;res-les-Bains 1814&ndash;1897 Plombi&egrave;res-les-Bains)<br />Date: ca. 1868<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436329" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436329</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP143194.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP143194-sm.jpg" width="630" height="763" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Pigeon House<br /> Artist: Roelof van Vries (Dutch, Haarlem 1630/31&ndash;after 1681)<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437922" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437922</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP145409.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP145409-sm.jpg" width="630" height="452" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Huis ten Bosch at The Hague and Its Formal Garden (View from the East)<br /> Artist: Jan van der Heyden (Dutch, Gorinchem 1637&ndash;1712 Amsterdam)<br /> Date: ca. 1668&ndash;70<br />Medium: Oil on wood</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436648" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436648</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP145911.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP145911-sm.jpg" width="630" height="488" /></a><br /><br /><span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">Wheat Fields<br /></span><span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">Artist: Jacob van Ruisdael (Dutch, Haarlem 1628/29&ndash;1682 Amsterdam)<br /></span><span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">Date: ca. 1670<br /></span><span style="color: #454545; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;">Medium: Oil on canvas<br /><br /></span><a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437549" style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; font-size: 12px;" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437549<br />&nbsp;</span></a></p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP145926.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DP145926-sm.jpg" width="630" height="416" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">The Pelkus Gate near Utrecht<br /> Artist: Jan van Goyen (Dutch, Leiden 1596&ndash;1656 The Hague)<br /> Date: 1646<br />Medium: Oil on wood</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436557" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436557</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DT8847.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DT8847-sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Venice: The Dogana and Santa Maria della Salute<br /> Artist: Workshop of Francesco Guardi (Italian, Venice 1712&ndash;1793 Venice)<br />Medium: Oil on wood</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436600" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436600</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/ep37.20.3.bw.R.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/ep37.20.3.bw.R-sm.jpg" width="630" height="460" /><br /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">Masquerade Ball at the Ritz Hotel, Paris<br /> Artist: Raimundo de Madrazo y Garreta (Spanish, Rome 1841&ndash;1920 Versailles)<br /> Date: 1909<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436927" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436927</span></a></span></p> <p><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DT2140.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/FineArtFriday/comingsoon/DT2140-sm.jpg" width="630" height="444" /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1">River with a Distant Tower<br /> Artist: Camille Corot (French, Paris 1796&ndash;1875 Paris)<br /> Date: 1865<br />Medium: Oil on canvas</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1"> <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/435983" target="_blank"><span class="s2">http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/435983</span></a></span></p>Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:16:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/04/137041.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/04/coming-this-week---fine-art-fridayAXYZ design launches anima 2.5Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/04/axyz-design-launches-anima-25"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/04/136441.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="/content/posts/2017_04/001_ClassroomHumans_V1.01_0001_crop.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/2017_04/001_ClassroomHumans_V1.01_0001_sm.jpg" width="630" height="295" /></a></p> <p>ANIMA 2 came on the market in June 2016 and after several updates it has been consolidated as the best solution for quickly and easily creating stunning 3D animations in very little time. ANIMA 2.5 becomes a software for daily usage to populate scenes mainly due to the introduction of Metropoly Ready-Posed model support for still imagery.</p> <p>ANIMA 2.5 is distributed as free upgrade for those customers who already have the software and can download directly from <a href="https://secure.axyz-design.com/anima-crowd-simulation-software-home" target="_blank">AXYZ website</a>.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>The 5 best new features of Anima 2.5<br /><br /></strong></span>This major update comes with lots of new features such as:</p> <p></p> <p>1. Support for Metropoly Ready-Posed characters,<br />2. Integrated online asset shop,<br />3. Exporting features for OpenCollada and V-Ray Scene formats,<br />4. Improved Custom Actor and Motion Clip importer,<br />5. Extended color variation support &amp; mask.</p> <p>For a detailed list of improvements and features please ready the <a href="https://docs.axyz-design.com/article/release-notes/" target="_blank">release notes.</a></p> <p></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Corporate production</strong></span></p> <p>To understand and make visible the improvements of Anima 2.5, here you have our latest <a href="https://vimeo.com/209362134" target="_blank">corporate production video.</a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>New additions to Anima 2.5</strong></p> <p>Moreover, there are new additions to the software as the new revamped visuals (lighting and 3d viewport shader improvements) and a new material and texture system that allows selecting render quality in the export options and plugins in order to optimize rendering times. Actor assets will now store different quality levels of the texture maps and the Actor editor displays a reference decal on the left view useful for determining the orientation and size of the character.</p> <p>It is also important to highlight that the auto-center support and free movement for background models has been vastly improved. Background models can be freely moved inside anima and the applied transformation will be reversed when exporting scenes or using anima Plugin. This is very useful for working with background models that are not centered in the origin 0,0,0.</p> <p>For more information about Anima 2.5 features watch the <a href="https://vimeo.com/210428007" target="_blank">demo reel</a> and visit the new <a href="https://vimeo.com/209362134" target="_blank">AXYZ website.</a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/2017_04/001_ClassroomHumans_V1.01_0004.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/2017_04/001_ClassroomHumans_V1.01_0004_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>Tue, 04 Apr 2017 00:26:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/04/136441.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/04/axyz-design-launches-anima-25VUE 2016 and PlantFactory 2016Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/03/vue-2016-and-plantfactory-2016"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/03/136354.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong>Paris, France - March 30, 2017 - E-on software</strong>, a leading global developer of software for the creation, animation, rendering, and integration of natural 3D environments in the computer graphics, VFX, architecture, and gaming industries, today announced the immediate availability of Release 2 (R2) of its VUE and PlantFactory 2016 software.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;These new releases reflect e-on software&rsquo;s commitment to bring new features and functionality to VUE and PlantFactory as frequently as possible. We plan to release incremental updates that introduce new functionality every four months,&rdquo; said Matt Riveccie, business development manager, e-on software.</p> <p>"We strive to engage even more with our users, making sure user feedback is at the core of our development efforts. The coming releases focus on optimizing user experience, strengthening our current technologies, and improving overall performance," added Nicholas Phelps, director, software development, visualization, Bentley Systems.&nbsp;</p> <p>Together with the new releases, e-on software is shipping free versions of its VUE 2016 and PlantFactory 2016 software. These include the VUE xStream and Infinite 2016 R2 Personal Learning Edition (PLE); the VUE Esprit, Studio, and Complete 2016 R2 trial versions; the PlantFactory Producer 2016 R2 PLE; and the PlantFactory Studio, Designer, and Artist 2016 R2 trial versions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>New in VUE 2016 R2</strong></p> <p>360&deg; Virtual Reality (VR) Panoramas: VUE 2016 R2 enables the rendering of 360&deg; panoramas as static images or animations, which are compatible with all of VUE&rsquo;s render options, such as multi-pass or high dynamic range (HDR). When rendering a VR panorama, VUE automatically levels the camera perfectly to avoid unwanted distortion. Rendered VR panoramas are automatically recognized by Facebook, YouTube, and other panoramic compliant platforms as 360&deg; images or videos.</p> <p></p> <p><strong><img src="/content/posts/2017_03/VUE2016_360VR_e-onsoftware.jpg" width="640" height="319" /><br /></strong></p> <p></p> <p>Up to 16 Viewports: VUE 2016 R2 enables the user to set up to 16 viewports instead of the four traditional views. This feature is particularly useful on a multi-monitor system to test various framing options or when adding more camera angles without touching any of the main scene setup. All additional viewports retain the same traditional options, such as render in view and the ability to set up as many perspective cameras as users would like.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>UX/UI Improvements:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Terrain Modeling:</p> <ul> <li>"Blend Terrain with Image" automatically modifies the Heightfield Terrain function graph (instead of modifying the terrain Heightmap).</li> <li>Simplified "Resample Terrain" replaces "Resize Terrain" to update terrain resolution without changing its size within the scene.</li> <li>User Interface:</li> <li>The "Interactive slider changes" option now also affects the mouse wheel for more dynamic visual display of users&rsquo; modifications in real-time.</li> <li>Improved visibility in viewports as a result of revised wireframe selection colors.</li> </ul> <p>The user interface is now locked when downloading an object or a scene from the extra content.</p> <p>Materials:</p> <ul> <li>Easier access and editing of multiple materials through sub-menu hierarchy display.</li> </ul> <div></div> <p><strong>New in PlantFactory 2016 R2</strong></p> <p>Stylized Meshing Mode: The new Stylized Meshing mode enables users to quickly and automatically generate a low polygon envelope version of vegetation models and export models with a small polygon footprint while retaining the actual vegetation visual volume. Additionally, envelope resolution, smoothing, and convexity quality is user configurable and can range from none to ultra-sharp edged meshes to ultra-smooth. Stylized Meshing mode can also be used creatively to produce non-photorealistic vegetation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="/content/posts/2017_03/PlantFactory2016_Envelope_e-onsoftware.gif" width="640" /></p> <p></p> <p>3-Axis Billboard Leaves Rotation: Using Billboard leaves is ideal when working for Real-Time engines, or, in an offline workflow, to create low polygon plants to be seen from a distance. (Billboard leaves are perfect for VUE EcoSystem populations for instance). Quick and easy to set up, this new feature is perfect to avoid any obvious linear visual pattern, by letting users add slight randomization to leaves axis rotation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Personal Learning Editions</strong></p> <p>The 2016 R2 Personal Learning Editions (PLE) are fully functional versions of VUE xStream/Infinite 2016 R2 and PlantFactory Producer 2016 R2. With the Personal Learning Edition, users can create complete projects, render in full HD, and save their work. Users can download the 2016 R2 Personal Learning Editions at no charge from <a href="http://www.e-onsoftware.com/try" target="_blank">www.e-onsoftware.com/try</a>.</p> <p>Personal Learning Editions are for learning purposes only, and it is illegal to use them for commercial purposes. They ship with a limited subset of product features and content, users cannot exchange files with other users (except ATC licenses), and renders carry a logo and will be watermarked after 30 days. Geometry exported from The PlantFactory PLE removes one polygon out of 20; import into VUE works with both the VUE PLE and full commercial licenses of VUE.</p> <p>Personal Learning Editions perform under all versions of Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10 (64 bit only), and Mac Intel (64 bit) for MacOSX 10.6+.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>30-Day Trial Versions</strong></p> <p>Thirty-day trial versions of both products are available for users to evaluate. Trial versions work for only 30 days and saving is disabled. Visit www.e-onsoftware.com/try for more information. VUE and PlantFactory 2016 R2 trial versions can be downloaded at no charge at www.e-onsoftware.com/try. Trial versions are available in English for Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10, and Mac Intel (64 bit) for MacOSX 10.6+.</p> <p>More information on VUE 2016 and PlantFactory 2016 is available at <a href="http://e-onsoftware.com/vue" target="_blank">e-onsoftware.com/vue</a> and <a href="http://www.plantfactorytech.com" target="_blank">plantfactorytech.com</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>Thu, 30 Mar 2017 15:19:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/03/136354.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/03/vue-2016-and-plantfactory-2016Lenovo Makes Professional Virtual Reality More AccessibleJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/03/lenovo-makes-professional-virtual-reality-more-accessible"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/03/136283.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><img src="/content/posts/2017_03/lenovo1.jpg" width="630" height="318" /><br /><br />By&nbsp;Rob Herman<br /><br />Today, Lenovo Workstations launched its VR-ready ThinkStation P320 at <a href="http://develop3dlive.com/" target="_blank">Develop3D Live</a>, the UK&rsquo;s premier design, engineering, visualization and manufacturing conference. Develop3D has placed an emphasis on virtual reality as a productivity tool in design workflows. &ldquo;We are convinced that VR is going to become a key technology for design and engineering in the coming years,&rdquo; Al Dean, Editor in Chief. The ThinkStation P320 is the latest addition to the Lenovo portfolio of VR-Ready certified workstations and is designed for power users looking to balance, both, performance and their budgets.</p> <p>Offering Pro VR certification gives those working in industries where the workstation is already recommended a more accessible avenue into VR. This certification gives ThinkStation P320 users an opportunity to add virtual reality more easily into their workflow without requiring an initial high-end hardware and software investment.</p> <p>The refreshed workstation will be available in both full-size tower and small form factor (SFF) and comes equipped with Intel&rsquo;s newest high-performance Xeon processors and the fastest Core i7 processors &ndash; offering speeds of up to 4.5GHz with Turbo Boost* &ndash; for unparalleled performance. Both form factors will also support the latest NVIDIA Quadro graphics cards; including support for dual NVIDIA Quadro P1000 GPUs in the small form factor. For those interested in stepping into the VR space, look no further than the VR-certified ThinkStation P320 full-size tower with the NVIDIA Quadro P4000 graphics card.</p> <p>While delivering superior reliability for users working on 2D and entry-level 3D workflows, the ThinkStation P320 also brings a unique offering to those looking for a breakthrough, entry-level way to create and consume VR. Suitable for both single-part and sub-assembly modelling in VR, the P320 is capable of delivering a refreshing VR experience to mechanical and design engineers alike.</p> <p><a href="https://www.virtalis.com/" target="_blank">Virtalis</a>, a leading VR and advanced visualization company, is already benefiting from the new ThinkStation P320. Powerful enough to drive the Virtalis VR4CAD software &ndash; an entry-level VR solution that can take full advantage of this workstation without compromising quality or price &ndash; the P320 is helping Virtalis expand its footprint in the evolving VR space.</p> <p>&ldquo;The ThinkStation P320&rsquo;s ProVR certification, along with its performance credentials, makes it a perfect match for the Virtalis VR4CAD software. It delivers a superb balance of 3D CAD and VR performance without breaking the bank,&rdquo; said Steve Carpenter, Sales Director at Virtalis. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s also perfect for small- to medium-sized companies looking to enhance their engineering workflow by taking their first steps onto the VR ladder.&rdquo;</p> <p>Building off the success of previous generations, the ISV certified ThinkStation P320 brings a faster, more powerful system that supports features including the fastest storage available in its class, up to 64GB DDR4 memory, and extreme customization with the FLEX Module. And in terms of environmental sustainability, the P320 is ENERGY STAR-qualified, as well as EPEAT Gold and GREENGUARD certified &ndash; ensuring customers that their products have met some of the highest environmental standards.</p> <p>The Lenovo ThinkStation P320 full-size tower and SFF will be available at the end of April. To learn more about this new product and its powerful features, visit <a href="https://www.thinkworkstations.com/" target="_blank">https://www.thinkworkstations.com/.</a></p> <p>*Available on tower with Intel Core i7 7700K processor</p>Tue, 28 Mar 2017 22:41:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/03/136283.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/03/lenovo-makes-professional-virtual-reality-more-accessibleMaking of: Project Soane - Consols Transfer OfficeJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/01/making-of-project-soane---consoles-transfer-office"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/01/133878.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong>PART 1 - Still Images</strong></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_001.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_001_sm.jpg" width="630" height="882" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_002.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_002_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_003.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_003_sm.jpg" width="630" height="882" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_004.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_004_sm.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></a></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <p><strong>Introduction</strong></p> <p>Hoare Lea&rsquo;s Project Soane submission was created by Hoare Lea CGI in collaboration with Hoare Lea Lighting, specialist visualisation and lighting design teams respectively.&nbsp;</p> <p>In this article we will explain the processes and workflows used in the 3D modelling, texturing and rendering of the Consols Transfer Office at Sir John Soane&rsquo;s, now demolished, Bank of England, whilst also touching on the design of the lighting scheme and its implementation into our 3D model.</p> <p>We went on to create an interactive VR experience for viewing with Oculus Rift and Cardboard VR. Using the model scene, we generated stereo-cubemaps combined with Unity 3D, to showcase daylighting features, and to give a glimpse of how the Consols Transfer Office might have looked today, had it survived and been lit with artificial lighting. We will describe this process in a follow-up article.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Software Used</strong></p> <p>Autodesk Revit 2016<br />Autodesk 3ds Max 2016 &amp; Vray<br />Adobe Photoshop CC&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>About the project</strong></p> <p>Our still images and the VR scene were created for the Project Soane competition organised by HP and NVIDIA in collaboration with Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Sir John Soane&rsquo;s Museum, Sir John Soane&rsquo;s Museum Foundation, Autodesk and, of course, CGarchitect.</p> <p>The task was to recreate and visualise in 3D the Bank of England as designed by Sir John Soane, and built from 1788 to 1833. Sir John Soane pioneered techniques to introduce daylight into his architecture. Sadly, most of Soane&rsquo;s Bank of England was destroyed in the 1920s, and today only historical drawings, sketches and a few rare photographs exist to show how the space appeared.</p> <p>We decided to re-create the Consols Transfer Office at the Bank, with a series of images, each as authentic as possible in terms of architecture, materials and lighting, and then develop this into an interactive VR scene.</p> <p>Our entries achieved the Runner-up spot in the Best Image category, while our VR simulation achieved an Honourable mention in the Best Real-Time category.</p> <p>For more info see here: http://projectsoane.com/winners_2016</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>From Revit to 3ds Max</strong></p> <p>A Revit model was provided from the first phase of the competition. However, some details were missing or incorrect. We therefore decided to use the original drawings, photos and the supplied model as a base reference, modelling in the missing details ourselves.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/001_Revit1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/001_Revit1_sm.jpg" width="630" height="381" /></a></p> <p>Revit model as supplied by Project Soane.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/002_Revit.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/002_Revit_sm.jpg" width="630" height="381" /></a></p> <p>The Consols Transfer Office was sectioned off and exported from Revit as an .FBX and linked into 3ds Max.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Research</strong></p> <p>Hand drawings by Soane showed his detailed design work for the interior. Because Soane undertook many design iterations, the tricky part was making sure the correct details were included. We cross-checked using the old photographs, in conjunction with these drawings.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/003_Soanes_drawings.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/003_Soanes_drawings_sm.jpg" width="630" height="328" /></a></p> <p>Detail drawings of the Consols Transfer Office by Sir John Soane (1880s)</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Modelling</strong></p> <p>Many different techniques were used in this process. We found the sweep tool particularly useful; bevel profile modifiers and alignment tools were also used to model walls, and cornices for example, with the correct profiles.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/004_Bevel_Modifier.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/004_Bevel_Modifier_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Example of the process to create a column</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/005_modelling2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/005_modelling2_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Ceiling details re-modelled to correspond with drawings and photographs.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/006_modelling3.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/006_modelling3_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Lanterns modelled and books added to worktops. Ceiling details added to arches and fireplace modelled from Soane&rsquo;s drawings.</p> <p>Modelling of the lantern was undertaken using the Lathe modifier and a simple spline profile.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/007_modelling4.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/007_modelling4_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Floor Generator used to generate the floor &ndash; a slight tilt creates irregularity.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/008_modelling5.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/008_modelling5_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Once modelling was complete, we had replaced approximately 75% of the scene. The coloured wireframes indicate new geometry, with the black showing the original Revit model.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Setting up the Daylight System</strong></p> <p>When it came to designing architecture that would maximise daylight, Sir John Soane was a genius. He was building at a time when artificial electric lighting did not exist, and so daylight was the best source for lighting architectural interiors (and still is today).&nbsp;</p> <p>We chose to show the space on the 21st December &ndash; the winter solstice &ndash; as this is when the sun is at its lowest point in the UK, hence the shortest day. This would have caused a gorgeous change in the colour temperature of the light entering the building, where it is warm as the sun rises, shifting to a blue colour as we reach midday, and then back to warm hues as the dusk skies arrive in the late afternoon.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/009_Draft_Lighitng_STILL_veiw2_1340.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/009_Draft_Lighitng_STILL_veiw2_1340_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p>Draft render of daylight at 1340hrs</p> <p></p> <p>The setup up shown below is a standard daylight system with a Vray Sun &amp; Sky (Hosek). The geo-location and orientation of the sun was established accurately with the Bank of England coordinates (latitude &amp; longitude taken from google) and the correct north orientation.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/010_daylight_setup1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/010_daylight_setup1_sm.jpg" width="630" height="349" /></a></p> <p>We then animated the sun path, to simulate and show exactly how the light levels and colour temperature would change in the space though a winter solstice day. We also researched the sun&rsquo;s Tyndall effect on the earth&rsquo;s atmosphere to ensure that the colour temperature was correct for the time of year. Typically, with the sun so low in the sky, the sky would be very warm in the mornings and blue at mid-day. We tweaked this using the Turbidity setting - animating it over time.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/011_daylight_setup2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/011_daylight_setup2_sm.jpg" width="630" height="397" /></a></p> <p>Draft renders of the lighting were created with a material override (material set to 50% diffuse / grey) at different times of day.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>Materials and Texturing</strong></p> <p>Creating materials for the scene required further analysis of the information available. A degree of artistic licence was taken, as we had no records of the finishes used. We therefore looked at the finishes of existing spaces in the Bank of England, Soane&rsquo;s artistic impressions, and the black and white photographs taken before demolition.</p> <p>We also ensured that the physical materials created had the correct reflectance values, so that the correct amount of light was absorbed and reflected for each material.&nbsp;</p> <p>All textures in this scene have been mapped on using either standard box mapping, using different map channels, or using Soulburn&rsquo;s blended box map script to seamlessly blend tiling textures.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><strong>STONE FLOOR</strong></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/012_Materials1_with_desc.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/012_Materials1_with_desc_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>We used three large textures to create the floor material. &nbsp;This was cut into eight rectangular tiles in Photoshop. These were then plugged into CG Sources Multi Texture node which when applied to the floor generated tiles, allowing for a random distribution across the floor.&nbsp;</p> <p>Colour correction nodes were used to desaturate and alter the colours of the tiles to create bump maps and reflectance maps. Reflections needed to be subtle and were therefore kept to a minimum and adjusted with the maps rollout in the material options. &nbsp;Vray Dirt maps were also used to accentuate gaps between tiles.</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/013_Floor_Material_sm.jpg" width="630" height="343" /></p> <p>Stone floor created with a Vray blend material and three Vray standard materials.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>STONE WALL</strong></p> <p>We wanted to make sure there was plenty of variation in the wall material, so that tiling was unnoticeable. This is also a blend material with a similar setup to the floor material shown above, but without the multi texture node.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/014_Materials2_with_desc.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/014_Materials2_with_desc_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Four different textures were used. These were colour corrected for diffuse, bump and reflectance, and then blended together using noise maps. Vray dirt was used to add some ambient occlusion at render time.</p> <p><strong>LANTERNS</strong></p> <p>Two materials were applied to the lanterns: a rough metal and a rough gold. Both materials were influenced by <a href="http://bertrand-benoit.com/blog/materialism-1-5-rough-metal/" target="_blank">Bertrand Benoit&rsquo;s method</a> of materialism for rough metal, with some subtle changes to get the required result.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/015_Materials3_with_desc.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/015_Materials3_with_desc_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p>Scratches and general wear-and-tear were added using overlay maps plugged into the Reflection Glossiness rollout. These were mapped onto the lanterns using a Soulburn script called &lsquo;blended box map maker&rsquo;, which is particularly good at making textures appear seamless on round objects, without having to unwrap the UVWs.</p> <p></p> <p><strong>WOODEN WORKBENCHES</strong></p> <p>Wood is a much simpler material to model. We added age wear-and-tear to the texture with a combination of a composite node to add the &lsquo;marks&rsquo; into the diffuse slot, and then plugging a black and white variant into the reflection glossiness rollout, adjusting its strength as necessary.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/016_Materials4_with_desc.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/016_Materials4_with_desc_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING</strong></p> <p>We visualised the space during the day and then at night to show how the Consols Transfer Office might have appeared with a contemporary lighting scheme. For the daytime stills we added period gas and oil lanterns, which would have been used in the early 1800s. Some fill light in the doorway was included to add life to that area of the corridor.</p> <p>In total, three lighting treatments were created for the still daytime renders: the doorway, the lanterns and the sunlight.</p> <p>For the night-time lighting scheme we worked with our in-house specialist lighting group who designed a scheme which carefully considered the architectural sensitivity of the space. All the products selected had to be subtle and wherever possible concealed from view. It was also important that the lighting highlighted the wonderful details and architectural features.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/017_Relux_photometric_lighting_calcs.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/017_Relux_photometric_lighting_calcs_sm.jpg" width="630" height="454" /></a></p> <p>The initial lighting design was undertaken in Relux, which is the standard lighting design software used by Hoare Lea. This allowed us to work out the correct products, lighting levels and positions.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once the lighting team was happy with the design, we translated it to our scene in 3ds max. The correct photometric files (IES) were used for each product and Vray IES lights ensured the outputs, colour temperatures, product positions and orientation were correct.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/018_Lighting1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/018_Lighting1_sm.jpg" width="630" height="394" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/019_3DS_Max_photometric_lighting_setup.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/019_3DS_Max_photometric_lighting_setup_sm.jpg" width="630" height="444" /></a></p> <p>Image showing 3ds max scene with all IES files in place.</p> <p>We rendered draft passes on low settings of each set of lighting treatments individually, so that we could quickly verify with our lighting team and make necessary adjustments to positions, outputs and colour temperature. Once we were happy with the lighting we rendered with all the combined lighting treatments.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/020_Lighting_layers.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/020_Lighting_layers_sm.jpg" width="630" height="501" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>ATMOSPHERIC EFFECTS AND CAMERA SETUP</strong></p> <p>Vray environment fog was used to create the rays of sunlight entering through the glazing. We wanted to keep this subtle so as not to take over the image, and therefore ran several draft renders on low settings until we had achieved the desired effect.&nbsp;</p> <p>Camera settings were the same for each camera. When we wanted certain items in the foreground to be out of focus, we used a wide aperture (F2.0) with a fairly high shutter speed to achieve the right exposure. See settings below.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/021_Camera__vray_fog_settings.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/021_Camera__vray_fog_settings_sm.jpg" width="630" height="517" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>RENDERING</strong></p> <p>We rendered the final images on high settings at 4k high resolution and saved them as 32bit EXRs to allow some tweaking of the exposure controls in post-production. Render settings are shown below.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/022_Render_settings.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/022_Render_settings_sm.jpg" width="630" height="581" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>POST PRODUCTION</strong></p> <p>When producing accurate lighting visuals we carry out as much of the lighting setup and tweaking in drafts before the final render, to avoid affecting the lighting in post-production. &nbsp;In this case very little post production was necessary, because the renders came out as expected, in terms of accurate lighting representation. We simply made some minor level adjustments, sharpening up the images to make the contrast &lsquo;pop&rsquo; a little.</p> <p><strong>FINAL IMAGES</strong></p> <p><strong>ALL FINAL IMAGES HERE.</strong></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_001.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_001_sm.jpg" width="630" height="882" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_002.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_002_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_003.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_003_sm.jpg" width="630" height="882" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_004.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/HL_SOANE/View_004_sm.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></a></p> <p></p> <p><strong>CONCLUSION</strong></p> <p>Though the modelling of bespoke detailing into the interior space took a lot of time to research and verify for accuracy against Soane&rsquo;s drawings and the sketches made available by the Museum Foundation &ndash; the challenge created an incredibly rewarding experience, with a great learning curve and insight into building construction in the early 1800s and the materials used.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once we had the model ready for the still images, we used it generate a VR simulation to showcase the daylighting and artificial lighting aspects.</p> <p>Watch out for our follow- up piece &lsquo;Project Soane &ndash; Consols Transfer Office &ndash; PART 2 &ndash; VR Simulation&rsquo;. For a taster, please see the video below:</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/181766427" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p>Thu, 12 Jan 2017 23:29:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/01/133878.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/01/making-of-project-soane---consoles-transfer-officeReview: NEC EA275UHD 27-Inch MonitorJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/01/review-necea275uhd-27-inch-monitor"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/01/133910.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>By: Corey Beaulieu (Neoscape)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/NECEA275UHD/ea275uhd-bk_lt.png" width="480" height="480" /></p> <p>I recently had the opportunity to try out the NEC EA275UHD 27-Inch monitor. More accurately, I was able to try out two of them, as well as the optional SpectraViewII EA Color Calibration Kit (SVII-EA-KIT). I elected for the dual setup. The arch-vis studio I work for recently switched to singular, ultra-wide, curved monitors, so it was nice to get back to what one might call a more normal display format. (Side note: I was not overly enthusiastic about the switch the studio made, but I&rsquo;ve come around to its merits.) I&rsquo;ll break down the experience, but for those looking for the shorthand: &nbsp;A lot of work filters through my desk and it is critical that I am always seeing what the client will see. It is also important that I see a full color spectrum so that the slightest adjustments can be made prior to delivery. These monitors provide a feature rich environment where many of my worries are being traded for certainty. Usability is great, and while the price is slightly higher than average, it is very competitive with any other UHD monitor out there and the features push it over the edge.&nbsp;</p> <p>A high end monitor is not mission critical to creating great work, but a monitor that will display your colors and contrast in the truest form possible is-- and this monitor provides this.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Introduction; The Arrival:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The monitors arrived pre-assembled and ready to go, with all the necessary cables included and the spring-loaded stand already attached. There was no fumbling with screws and cover panels. I removed the packing materials, setup them up on my desk, and got going. Quick and Easy. &nbsp;</p> <p>The monitor boasts a UHD, sRGB display (3840x2160) on an AH-IPS panel and a native resolution of 163 ppi which amounts to a color-rich and sharp viewing experience across the 27&rdquo; display. One thing to note, however, that each monitor is 25&rdquo; wide, so dual monitors are going to cost you over 4&rsquo; of desk space. If you work in a bullpen like I do, answering the phone can get a bit tricky. A new-to-me feature of this twin monitor set up is the ControlSync feature. It allows the user to manage the preferences of both monitors through a single monitor&rsquo;s menu panels through an additional cable (provided) running beneath the displays. At first I found this cable unsightly, but quickly forgot it was even there and ultimately found it quite useful.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/NECEA275UHD/ea275uhd-bk_htadj-x.png" width="480" height="480" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>First Impressions:</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>In our studio, we run Windows 7 and that had an impact on my trial. I was ready to be immediately blown away, but Windows had other plans. The UHD display was too much to handle. &nbsp;The lack of automated text and icon scaling impacted the usability of almost every piece of software I use. The small display size was giving me massive headaches and reading the far edge of the second monitor was impossible and active menus were hard to make out. But read on&hellip;&nbsp;</p> <p>This problem is not specific to these monitors. I would have had the same experience with any UHD monitor. I was able to find some built-in workarounds and mostly solved the problem by changing a few settings.&nbsp;</p> <p>The solution: Windows offers a global display zoom in the Control Panel that will scale all explorer windows and icons. I wound up using 125% native increase in my displays. It wasn&rsquo;t perfect, but 150% was too big.&nbsp;</p> <p>Some programs, like the latest Creative Suite, do have auto UI scaling and were not an issue. I never figured out how to scale in 3DS Max 2016, but 2017 does have a degree of auto scaling. It is still on the small side, but it is totally workable and the pixel density of these monitors was amazing for keeping more menus and viewport visibility. Our studio hasn&rsquo;t made the switch to 2017 yet, though, so I was left to muddle through with a lot of squinting and glasses-wearing. &nbsp;Scaling aside, there is just no trading the ability to see 80+ percent of your final image on screen. The post-pro process was infinitely better.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Color Calibration:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The optional SpectraViewII EA Color Calibration Kit (SVII-EA-KIT) ensured that I was getting the best color representation. In the interest of full disclosure, I think that anyone looking to get the best out of any monitor should invest in a color calibrator. Yes, it&rsquo;s extra money, but benefits of a calibrated display are innumerable and make a marked difference in final quality.&nbsp;</p> <p>A few years ago I purchased the i1Display Pro for both home and studio, and I&rsquo;m really happy with it. The NEC device is physically the exact same, which I liked, but I was less impressed with the SpectraView software (SVIISOFT). The device itself performs amazingly; it is easy to use and very effective, but the interface was closer to a script than a full UI. Some of the features were better than my previous i1Profiler, like the presets for print, digital, web design, etc., but the UX didn&rsquo;t give me confidence in making choices when I was on my own. I also felt (true or not) that I was missing options that might have been hidden behind menus. In the end, I did find my way around the product without a problem, but it wasn&rsquo;t a stand out experience. &nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2017_01/NECEA275UHD/svii-ea-kit-1.png" width="480" height="480" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p>The NECEA275UHD monitors store the color profile within the hardware. This bit was very interesting to me as it means that the monitors themselves are storing the profile. While my previous i1 Display Pro created a profile to correct any color deficiencies in my monitor by adjusting the outgoing signal, the SpectraViewII EA Color Calibrator placed the profile in the display which amounts to a noticeable improvement in color banding. Rather than clamping the signal to the display, the profile was affecting the performance of the display at its root and a fuller spectrum of color was being utilized.</p> <p>While this difference may seem small, what it means is to the end user is far greater. Rather than using all software as normal, default working color space, the implication here is that one needs to be sure and select the newly created profile in order to get the truest output. In using other calibrators, you can keep your standard sRGB color space in all softwares, but with the SpectraViewII EA Color Calibrator, the monitor specific profile for all color sensitive softwares must be selected in the preferences. None of this is hard, but it does add a step in terms of usability, and one I would have missed without a having spoken with the rep. And just so it is said, the result of maintaining a color profile has a huge pay off.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><strong>End User Features:</strong></p> <p>These monitors have several thoughtful, user-centric features, including some great creature comfort features that I found useful. One of my favorite features is perhaps the most trivial: these monitors are able to sense your presence. I sit on an aisle and I attend a lot of meetings and loved that the monitor reacted to my presence and dimmed accordingly. It wasn&rsquo;t perfect and I would have to reset the feature once in a while, but I liked it nonetheless.&nbsp;</p> <p>One of my pet peeves is when I switch from modeling to searching the web during a test render and getting blown away by the over-bright whites of many common webpages. Good news. These NECEA275UHD displays manage this imbalance with a content aware mode that suppresses the white backgrounds of websites. It worked so seamlessly that I never once noticed its presence, always noticed its absence.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fFaHIWBpXnQ?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p>In other products (i1 Display Pro) the device must be plugged in to account for the ambient lighting conditions of the user and has no content awareness. With these monitors, the ambient light adjustments are done automatically. The alterations were so smooth that I experienced a 100% consistent look to my monitors all the time.&nbsp;</p> <p>The best feature (in my opinion) is the matte finish screen. The anti-glare, matte-finish gave consistency and solidity to everything I viewed. My visual assessment of the display gave me the confidence to say that I was going to deliver images that were exactly how I wanted them to be delivered. Whether video or 4k+ illustration, I saw an image that was print proof quality and I didn&rsquo;t need any glossy enhancement to feel good about the content.</p> <p>Lastly, the synchronicity of the monitors is impeccable and altogether convenient. Anytime I made a decision within one monitor&rsquo;s menu space, the information was automatically transferred to the other. This means that the human sensor, the brightness awareness, the ambient light sensor, etc. were all being shared amongst both monitors, while also maintaining separate color profiles.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="630" height="354" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X-ZTxo0HvDg?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p></p> <p>It can be difficult to navigate finding the best monitor for your workstation and on a lot of levels, all monitors can seem the same. Price may set some apart, but with the NECEA275UHD sets itself apart by having some of the most user friendly options around.&nbsp;</p> <p>The UHD aspect ration and 163ppi are not be unique to the NEC monitor, but the matte finish display and the above user features are. Price is always a factor and these monitors land themselves squarely in the middle, but if you are in the market for a 4k monitor you should take a good long look at the NECEA275UHD. They leave little to be desired and should you get these or any other monitor, do yourself a favor and purchase a color calibrator along with it.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>For more information about this display, you can visit the <a href="http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/ea275uhd-bk" target="_blank">NEC website</a>&nbsp;</p>Wed, 11 Jan 2017 11:39:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2017/01/133910.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2017/01/review-necea275uhd-27-inch-monitor2016 Architectural Visualization Rendering Engine Survey - RESULTSJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/11/2016-architectural-visualization-rendering-engine-survey---results"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/11/132618.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_11/renderingsurvey-sm-results.jpg" width="630" height="376" /></p> <p></p> <p>As there have been a number of changes in the popularity of new rendering engines in the architectural visualization space, CGarchitect surveyed our audience about their rendering engine usage. &nbsp;</p> <p>The survey was conducted over October and November 2016 for just over 30 days. &nbsp;There were a total of 1,995 participants in the survey, all of whom are involved in arch. viz. production.<br /><br />EDIT (Dec 1, 2016): &nbsp;So there is no misunderstanding of these results, this survey obviously represents the views of CGarchitect users, who are predomentantly mid to high end visualization specialists in architectural firms and dedicated visualization studios. To better understand the makeup of this audience and our site, we invite interested parties to review our current industry surveys here for more details:&nbsp;<a href="/features/category/industry-surveys">http://www.cgarchitect.com/features/category/industry-surveys</a><br /><br />Based on our understanding of the industry this equates to a Margin of Error of 3%, &nbsp;99 percent of the time.<br /><br />Upon filtering the data we were also able to determine some interesting trends as well:<br /><br />&nbsp;- 55% of V-Ray users are experimenting with another renndering engine: Corona (44.7%), Unreal (31.9%), FStorm (23.6%), Octane (15.2%), V-Ray RT (14.5%), Arnold (9.7%), Lumion (8.8%), Maxwell Render (5.9%), Redshift (5.9%). Of these users, 26% plan to replace V-Ray as their primary rendering engine, the reminder (64%) will supplement V-Ray.<br /><br />- &nbsp;Of V-Ray users currently experimenting with Corona, &nbsp;26% intend to replace their existing production renderer, 63% intend to supplement their existing rendering engine.<br /><br />- &nbsp;Of V-Ray users currently experimenting with FStorm, &nbsp;29% intend to replace their existing production renderer, 65% intend to supplement their existing rendering engine.&nbsp;</p> <p>- 58% of mental ray users are experimenting with another renndering engine: Corona (32.8%), Unreal (27.6%), V-Ray Adv (24.1%), V-Ray RT (24.1%), Iray (15.5%), Arnold (13.8%), Octane (12.1%), FStorm (12.1%), Lumion (10.3%)<br /><br />&nbsp;- 52% of Corona users are experimenting with another renndering engine: FStorm (42.9%), Unreal (29.4%), Octane (20.6%), V-Ray (10.6%) Arnold (8.8%), V-Ray RT (8.2%), Lumion (7.6%), Redshift (7.1%), Iray (6.5%)</p> <p></p> <p><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_11/Chart_Q2_161130.jpg" width="650" height="3311" /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_11/Chart_Q3_161130.jpg" width="650" height="427" /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_11/Chart_Q4_161130.jpg" width="650" height="3287" /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_11/Chart_Q5_161130.jpg" width="650" height="571" /><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_11/Chart_Q6_161130.jpg" width="650" height="451" /><br /><br />&nbsp;</p>Wed, 30 Nov 2016 16:36:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/11/132618.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/11/2016-architectural-visualization-rendering-engine-survey---resultsUE4 VR arch interior testxiaoguang wang<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/189749298" width="630" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p>Model from the Internet</p><p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/11/ue4-vr-arch-interior-test"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/131616.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) -->Tue, 01 Nov 2016 01:52:39 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/131616.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/11/ue4-vr-arch-interior-test2016 Architectural Visualization Rendering Engine SurveyJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/10/2016-architectural-visualization-rendering-engine-survey"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/10/131164.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/rendering2016" target="_blank"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;"><img src="/content/posts/2016_10/renderingsurvey-sm2.jpg" width="630" height="376" /></span></a></p> <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;"><br /></span></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/rendering2016" target="_blank"><span color="#333333" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/rendering2016</span></span></a><br /><br /><br /><span color="#333333" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">This is a short survey to determine current rendering engine market share in architectural visualization, which new rendering engines&nbsp;are being tested and if there are any plans to switch rendering engines.</span></span></span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;" /><br style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;" /><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">This&nbsp;survey should take only a few&nbsp;minutes&nbsp;at most to complete.</span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;" /><br style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;" /><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">We will be posting the results publicly once we receive a sufficient number of responses to be statistically representative. &nbsp;Our hope is to publish the results sometime in November on CGarchitect and our social media properties.</span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;" /><br style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;" /><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">Thank you for your time!</span></p>Thu, 20 Oct 2016 00:13:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/10/131164.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/10/2016-architectural-visualization-rendering-engine-surveyTom Glimps Octane Render CompetitionJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/09/tom-glimps-octane-render-competition"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/09/129776.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p class="p1"><span class="s1">We'd like to share a small Contest organized by <a href="http://tomglimps.com/" target="_blank"><span class="s2">tomGlimps</span></a>. While the still image phase is now over and the three winners have been announced below.&nbsp;</span>The most important thing is that VR submissions are still open for submissions and&nbsp;will be open for another month (until October 15, 2016). &nbsp;You can check out the competition site here:&nbsp;<a href="http://tomglimps.com/octane-render-contest"><span class="s2">Contest</span></a></p> <p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1">Still Image Phase winners</span></strong></p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/2016_09/TG1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/2016_09/TG1_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a>Nikita Shestakov</p> <p class="p3"><span class="s2"><a href="https://www.behance.net/nikita-shestakov" target="_blank">https://www.behance.net/nikita-shestakov<br /></a></span><a href="https://www.facebook.com/ns.visuals/" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/ns.visuals/</a></p> <p class="p1"><a href="/content/posts/2016_09/TG2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/2016_09/TG2_sm.jpg" width="630" height="473" /></a>Jens Suhr Andersen | Ikonoform</p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><a href="http://ikonoform.com/" target="_blank">http://ikonoform.com<br /></a></span><a href="http://facebook.com/ikonoform" target="_blank">http://facebook.com/ikonoform<br /></a><a href="http://instagram.com/ikonoform" target="_blank">http://instagram.com/ikonoform<br /></a></p> <p class="p3"><a href="/content/posts/2016_09/TG3.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/2016_09/TG3_sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /><br /></a></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Cedric Henry | pxlntwrk<br /> </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><a href="http://cedrichenry.info/" target="_blank">http://cedrichenry.info<br /></a></span><a href="http://pxlntwrk.net/" target="_blank">http://pxlntwrk.net</a>&nbsp;</p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"> <br />A temporary licence for Octane Render v3 will be provided. You just need complete the form on the bottom of the Contest page showing some progress related to a given task. You can also get&nbsp;<a href="http://scatter.phantomtechnology.nl/" target="_blank"><span class="s2">Phantom Scatter</span></a> licences if you choose to work with Octane Render standalone.</span></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Wherever you decide to start posting (for instance over <a href="http://forums.cgarchitect.com/" target="_blank">CGarchitect forums</a>) all you need to do is inform tomGlimps. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to get in touch with him using form in the bottom of <a href="http://tomglimps.com/octane-render-contest/" target="_blank"><span class="s2">contest page</span></a>.</span></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Prizes for winners include:</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">* <a href="https://www3.oculus.com/en-us/rift/" target="_blank"><span class="s2">Oculus Rift</span></a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">* <a href="http://www.amd.com/en-gb/products/graphics/workstation/radeon-pro" target="_blank"><span class="s2">AMD WX7100</span></a> (capable of powering up to four 5K screens)</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">* OctaneRender Combo licence (standalone + chosen plugin)</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">* <a href="http://quixel.se/suite/" target="_blank"><span class="s2">Quixel Suite</span></a> Freelance + subsciption of <a href="https://megascans.se/"><span class="s2">MegaScans</span></a>&nbsp;freelance for half a year</span></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s3">* <a href="https://www.lightmap.co.uk/hdrlightstudio/" target="_blank"><span class="s4">HDR Studio Light 5</span></a></span></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s3">* <a href="http://scatter.phantomtechnology.nl/" target="_blank"><span class="s4">Phantom Scatter</span></a> Licence</span></p> <p class="p4"><span class="s3">* <a href="http://www.laubwerk.com/" target="_blank"><span class="s4">Laubwerk Plants</span></a> Kit</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">&amp; probably even more as the list of prize sponsors is still growing!</span></p> <p class="p3"></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The VR winners will be announced in few days after deadline on CGarchitect.</span></p>Mon, 19 Sep 2016 06:50:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/09/129776.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/09/tom-glimps-octane-render-competitionSurvey Results: VR Usage in Arch VizJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/07/survey-results-vr-usage-in-arch-viz"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/07/127874.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p>In July 2016 we surveyed CGarchitect members across our sites, newsletters and social media to see how they were currently using VR in production and how they planned to use VR in 2016 and 2017. &nbsp;We received responses from across the globe:<br /><br />Europe: 40%<br />USA: 21%<br />Asia: 11%<br />South America: 9%<br />Oceania: 5%<br />Middle East: 3%<br />Canada: 3%<br />Africa: 3%<br />Mexico: 2%<br />Central America: 1%&nbsp;<br /><br />The majority of participants worked in Architectural Visualization studios and Architectural firms.<br /><br />Architectural Visualization Studio: 43%<br />Architectural Firm: 22%<br />Freelancer 10%<br />Interior Design Firm: 4%<br />Software/Hardware/Content Manufacturer or Service Vendor: 4%<br />Advertising/Marketing/Creative Agency: 3%<br />Engineering Firm: 3%<br />Gaming/Film/Entertainment Company: 2%<br />Student: 2%<br />Building Contractor: 1%<br />Manufacturer: 1%<br />Industrial Design: 1%<br />Information Technology: 1%<br />Retail Designer: 1%<br />Academic (Teacher, Professor, Researcher, Lecturer): 1%&nbsp;</p> <p><br /><br /><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/infographics/VR2016-IG1a.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/infographics/VR2016-IG1a_sm.jpg" width="630" height="711" /></a><br /><br /><br /><br />We received many comments from participants, mostly overwealmingly positive on the potential of VR within the architecture industry:<br /><br />"It will change the industry"<br /><br />"Natural fit, Will usher in a new era for builders picking materials and finish options."<br /><br />"it's the future"<br /><br />"It will be a revolution!!"<br /><br />"The hype is full on"<br /><br />"The tech is adequate, but buy in by management and clients is problematic at best"<br /><br />"Currently i don't feel like VR is needed in archviz industry."<br /><br />"Its very exciting, we are now looking at it as a serious method of communication"<br /><br />"i think VR /AR/MR will be a norm for clients to ask for presentations in the future"<br /><br />"I think the VR is really your future, however the HMD's need to improve regarding motion sickness."<br /><br />"This will definitely change the way people look into things."&nbsp;</p>Wed, 20 Jul 2016 13:30:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/07/127874.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/07/survey-results-vr-usage-in-arch-viz2016 CGarchitect 3D Awards - Nominees Announced!Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/07/2016-cgarchitect-3d-awards-nominees"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/04/124821.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3dawards.cgarchitect.com" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/2016_07/cover2.jpg" width="600" height="350" /><br /></a></p> <h1 style="text-align: center;">Congratulations to the Nominees of the 2016 CGarchitect Architectural 3Dawards<br />&nbsp;</h1> <p style="text-align: center;">The CGarchitect.com Architectural 3D Awards were started in 2004 to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of architectural visualization. In such a competitive field it becomes more and more difficult make yourself seen. With the wide visibility of CGarchitect, what better way to use this exposure than to help the artists that make up our community. 2016 marks our 13th annual awards. Past awards have taken place in Los Angeles, San Diego, Boston and Spain. Over the past twelve years many extremely talented individuals and companies have gone on to form new alliances and partnerships and advanced their careers.&nbsp;<br /><br /></p> <center> <h1><a target="_blank" href="http://cgar.ch/29sSHO2">VIEW THE NOMINEES<br /><br /></a></h1> </center> <p style="text-align: center;"></p> <h1 style="text-align: center;">Thank You to Our Sponsors!</h1> <p>Each year we continue to push the bar higher and this year is no exception. We have launched a brand new awards site full of award winning imagery and over $64,000 in prizes. However as hard as we work, none of this would be possible without the VERY generous support of our sponsors. We want to thank all of them for their help this year in launching our biggest awards ever.<br /><br /></p> <center> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"> <td valign="top" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa;"> <h2><!-- CONTENT start --> <img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da-diamond.jpg" alt="2013 CGarchitect Architectural 3D Awards" title="" width="600" height="75" border="0" style="max-width: 600px; display: block;" /><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.cgarchitect.com/2012/05/global-research-unit"></a></h2> <!-- CONTENT end --></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"><!-- CONTENT start --> <td valign="top" align="left" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa; width: 290px;"><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.nvidia.com/page/home.html"></a></td> <td width="20" style="padding: 0;"><a href="http://3dawards.cgarchitect.com"><img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da2013-nvidia.jpg" alt="" title="" width="290" height="180" border="0" style="max-width: 290px; display: block;" /></a></td> <td valign="top" align="left" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa; width: 290px;"><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.nvidia.com/page/home.html"></a><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.nvidia.com/page/home.html"></a></td> <!-- CONTENT end --></tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"> <td valign="top" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa;"> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><!-- CONTENT start --> <img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da-category.jpg" alt="2013 CGarchitect Architectural 3D Awards" title="" width="600" height="75" border="0" style="max-width: 600px; display: block;" /><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.cgarchitect.com/2012/05/global-research-unit"></a></h2> <!-- CONTENT end --></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"><!-- CONTENT start --> <td width="187" valign="top" align="left" style="padding: 0;"><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.cgarchitect.com/2013/03/interior338"></a><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.nvidia.com/page/home.html"></a><a href="http://3dawards.cgarchitect.com"><img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da2013-rebus.jpg" alt="" title="" width="187" height="160" border="0" style="max-width: 187px; display: block;" /></a></td> <td style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px; background-color: #fafafa;">&nbsp;</td> <td width="186" valign="top" align="center" style="padding: 0;"><a href="http://3dawards.cgarchitect.com"><img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da2013-chaos.jpg" alt="" title="" width="187" height="160" border="0" style="max-width: 186px; display: block;" /></a></td> <!-- CONTENT end --></tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"> <td valign="top" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa;">&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"> <td valign="top" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa;"> <h2><!-- CONTENT start --> <img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da-prize.jpg" alt="2013 CGarchitect Architectural 3D Awards" title="" width="600" height="75" border="0" style="max-width: 600px; display: block;" /><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.cgarchitect.com/2012/05/global-research-unit"></a></h2> <!-- CONTENT end --></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" class="line" style="border-bottom-width: 0px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: #aaaaaa; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"> <td style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa; height: 10px;">&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #787878; width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr style="padding: 0;"> <td valign="top" style="padding: 0px; background-color: #fafafa;"> <h2><!-- CONTENT start --> <a href="http://3dawards.cgarchitect.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://newsletter.cgarchitect.com/newsletter-images/images/3da-2016-prize-sponsors.png" alt="2013 CGarchitect Architectural 3D Awards" width="600" height="350" border="0" usemap="#Map" style="max-width: 600px; display: block; border: 0;" title="" /></a><a href="##TrackClick##http://www.cgarchitect.com/2012/05/global-research-unit"></a></h2> <!-- CONTENT end --></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </center>Wed, 06 Jul 2016 20:36:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/04/124821.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/07/2016-cgarchitect-3d-awards-nomineesVirtual Reality in Arch Viz - Hype or Reality?Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/07/virtual-reality-in-arch-viz---hype-or-reality"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/07/127357.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><strong>The Resurgence of VR</strong></p> <p>Anyone who has been around the visualization industry a while knows VR is certainly not new. In fact the HMDs (Head-Mounted Displays) as we know them today came about in the 1960s and saw a somewhat disastrous resurgence in the 1990s in the consumer space. 

</p> <p>When the hype started all over again a few years ago with the release of Oculus&rsquo; DK1 (Developers Kit 1) Kickstarter, I have to admit I viewed it with a healthy amount of skepticism. &nbsp;So much so, it was not until mid 2013 that I even bothered to give it a try, despite having walked passed crowded Oculus booths a number of times in my travels to events around globe. &nbsp;Like so many technologies in the 3D/CG field I&rsquo;ve seen over the last 21 years, I chalked the DK1 up to yet another soon to fail technology - right there next to 3D televisions. What I am witnessing in our own field has really taken me a bit by surprise and it seems this is a technology that is not going away any time soon. Its path is certainly not paved in gold, but I think it actually stands a chance this time!

</p> <p>Architecture is generally one of the most technology laggard fields around, so when I started seeing around 50% of the architectural firms and visualization studios purchasing DK1&rsquo;s, I was a bit taken aback. &nbsp;What was it this time that made this not only a seemingly viable technology, but a technology that even the most technology averse companies were wanting to purchase and put into practice? 

</p> <p>Throughout 2014 and into mid 2015 I slowly watched more and more companies experimenting behind the scenes. Many not even knowing how it would be used in production. By late 2015 a critical mass of new technology companies jumping behind the VR movement, coupled with actual internal and external client projects successfully being developed within our own field, appears to have been a recipe for success. &nbsp;I&rsquo;ve even spoken to one company who told me the revenue they are currently generating on the VR side of the business is surpassing their bread and butter imagery work in terms of profitability.</p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0936.jpg" target="_blank"><br /><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0936_sm.jpg" width="630" height="382" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0936.jpg" target="_blank"></a><em>NVIDIA VR Experience Pods at GTC</em><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0946.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0946_sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0946.jpg" target="_blank"></a><em>NVIDIA VR Experience Pods at GTC - line ups for hours.&nbsp;</em></p> <p></p> <p><strong>Why VR, Why Now?</strong></p> <p>Unless you&rsquo;ve tried VR it&rsquo;s really hard to put into words why it has so many people excited and why it feels so amazing. Two words that I think describe its usefulness in architecture are: Scale and Presence. &nbsp;Two things that also neatly sum up what we feel when we experience architecture in the real world. &nbsp;This ability to experience a space we can&rsquo;t visit, or one that does not yet exist, is the basis of nearly everything professionals in the field of architectural visualization do on a daily basis, so really VR is quite complementary and takes what we do to another level.</p> <p>So why is VR having a resurgence now and why might it be here to stay this time? &nbsp;Quite simply the technology required for us to start to developing near reality experiences did not exist until very recently. &nbsp;Even as recently as ten years ago we did not have a 1080p display small enough to fit an HMD. We can thank the mobile phone market for pushing that forward. &nbsp;Another big catalyst for VR has been the advancements of real-time computer graphics compute power.</p> <p>Both NVIDIA and AMD have announced video cards that are orders of magnitude faster than their predecessors. &nbsp;Companies like Oculus, HTC, Microsoft, and dozens more are simply packaging an ecosystem and hardware in a way that can leverage these advancements in a way that supports VR experiences. &nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0330.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0330_sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a></p> <p><em>Oculus DK2 at the End User Event</em></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/IMG_6323.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/IMG_6323_sm.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></a></p> <p><em>Microsoft Hololens at the End User Event</em></p> <p><strong>Challenges Ahead</strong></p> <p>While the business cases and initial successes with VR in architecture are positive, there remains many outside forces that will dictate whether VR will stay. &nbsp;AR (Augmented Reality) HMDs have a long and successful presence in the industrial/commercial space, but VR, for now, is primarily being targeted to the consumer space, and it&rsquo;s a bit of a chicken or the egg scenario at the moment. &nbsp;People don&rsquo;t buy HMDs en-masse unless there are titles, and game developers don&rsquo;t develop big titles unless there is a large enough market to support it. &nbsp;Which brings us to the number one issue I see with VR HMDs in the consumer space - price. &nbsp;

</p> <p>By far the best VR experience is currently the HTC Vive, but at $800 that is far from affordable at the consumer level, and that&rsquo;s just the HMD. &nbsp;You are going to spend at least another $2,000 for a PC capable of driving a VR experience, which puts this out of reach to all but the most avid gamers and professionals. &nbsp; NVIDIA recently estimated that less than 1% of all PCs on the market in 2016, will be able to run a VR experience. &nbsp;So the question now becomes, how long are these VR hardware developers willing to wait for an audience and how big does that audience need to be for it to be profitable? &nbsp;And more importantly, will the commercial side of the industry factor into their equations? &nbsp;HTC just recently announced a <a href="https://www.htcvive.com/us/enterprise/" target="_blank">Vive Business Edition</a>, so it&rsquo;s clear they understand the market exists, but is it enough? &nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/IMG_6279.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/IMG_6279_sm.jpg" width="630" height="473" /></a></p> <p><em>Leap Motion gesture control in VR</em></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0846.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/DSCF0846_sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a></p> <p><em>Autodesk <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/campaigns/livedesign" target="_blank">Stingray</a></em></p> <p>From a form factor point of view, size, weight, and untethered experience are all high on the list of improvements that need to happen, in addition to increased screen resolution. &nbsp;

</p> <p>From a technology stand point of view, all of the pieces of the puzzle are there, but the business model and hardware refinements are far from resolved. I think the next 24-36 months will be very telling. &nbsp;Gartners, an industry analysis company that plots new technology trends, places VR just exiting the Trough of Disillusionment with a 5-10 year horizon to reach the Plateau of Productively. &nbsp;I had a chance to speak to one of the analysts who helps determine where these technologies fall on the graph and I commented how I was surprised not to find it at the top of the hype curve. &nbsp;He said, they debated if they should &ldquo;reset the clock&rdquo; and place it there, however the current position reflects the decades of work that came before, even though the industry was literally in a holding pattern for 20 years. &nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_07/gartner2015emergtechhypecycle.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/gartner2015emergtechhypecycle_sm.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a></p> <p><em>Gartners Emerging Technology <a href="http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/3114217" target="_blank">Hype Cycle 2015</a></em></p> <p></p> <p><strong>How is it being used now?</strong><br /><br />

It&rsquo;s still very early days, but I am seeing new companies popping up almost daily announcing they are working with VR on client projects. &nbsp;Architectural firms like Gensler are using it to gain buy-in on design proposals from their clients and to help internal design discussions. &nbsp;Some visualization companies are taking existing projects and porting them to VR and to help developers better understand their spaces. &nbsp; <br /><br />Over the coming months, our plan is to develop an entire series of articles around the use of VR/AR/MR in architectural visualization, including in depth discussions about what it means from a business perspective and what opportunities exist, and how this technology might impact our field.

</p> <p>In the interim, we&rsquo;d love to know what you think, what you&rsquo;d like to see, and to tell us what your plans are for VR/AR/MR in your business in 2016 and 2017. &nbsp;</p> <p>We&rsquo;ve put together a very quick survey below and will be publishing the results as soon as we get a good number of results. &nbsp;Hopefully within the next few weeks. &nbsp;Only takes 1-5 minutes to complete.</p> <p></p> <p><a href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8KV2F9C" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_07/survey.jpg" width="630" height="300" /></a></p>Tue, 05 Jul 2016 13:46:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/07/127357.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/07/virtual-reality-in-arch-viz---hype-or-reality3ds max | 3d Data visualisation |3d images | vrayJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/04/3ds-max--3d-data-visualisation-3d-images--vray"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/04/124383.jpg" /></a></p><p>Photoshop post production tutorial</p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; 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font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><span style="border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;"><b>Digital Frontier</b></span></span></p> <p><a href="/2015/09/competition12"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2015/09/117193/Form4inc_Jeju_Airport_final09B_medium.jpg" width="630" height="745" /></a><span color="#646464" face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" style="color: #646464; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><span style="border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;"><b>Tomek Miksa</b></span></span></p> <p><a href="/2015/09/exterior--housing--night-urban-development"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2015/09/117022/2015_04_R24_-_Architectural_visualization_rendering_exterior_night_snow_winter_housing_urban_development_medium.jpg" width="630" height="369" /></a><span color="#646464" face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" style="color: #646464; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><span style="border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;"><b>Vlad Vernica</b></span></span></p> <p><a href="/2015/08/cashman-battery"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2015/08/116287/Aerial_view_01_medium.jpg" width="630" height="356" /></a><span color="#646464" face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" style="color: #646464; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><span style="border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;"><b>Cubic Meter</b></span></span></p> <p><a href="/2016/02/the-whole-picture" target="_self"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2016/02/123019/Beauty_and_The_Bit_Dyrvik_Kabelgata_01_medium.jpg" width="630" height="420" /></a>Victor Bonafonte</p>Tue, 22 Mar 2016 23:40:00 MDThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2013/11/89402.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/03/inspiration-aerials-vol-1SketchFX for SketchUpElijah Bell<iframe width="630" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/FAWhjFJpJDc?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><p>Visualization extension for SketchUp that rivals Piranesi at a fraction of the cost! Check it out!</p><p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/03/sketchfx-for-sketchup"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/123103.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) -->Wed, 02 Mar 2016 09:08:30 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/123103.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/03/sketchfx-for-sketchup2016 the Year of VR: Stingray and LIVE DesignJeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/2016-the-year-of-vr-stingray-and-live-design"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/02/122706.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFCity-FullView_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFCity-FullView_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a></p> <p></p> <p>Just before the new year over 10,000 people descended on Las Vegas for the 22nd annual Autodesk University (AU) conference. &nbsp;CGarchitect has been attending AU for quite a few years, but was fortunate this year to be heavily involved in the inaugural <a href="http://design-viz-live.cgarchitect.com" target="_blank">Design Visualization LIVE event</a>. &nbsp;The first annual gathering of the best and brightest people in the Design Visualization industry. For those of you who were not able to attend, many of the sessions were recorded and can be viewed <a href="http://design-viz-live.cgarchitect.com/#video" target="_blank">online here</a>. &nbsp;This massively successful event-within-an-event drew professional visualization artists, architects and designers from all around the world.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>Autodesk LIVE Design was also debuted during the event - it is a vision for the future of connected software making it possible to understand every design digitally before anything is <a href="http://aecmag.com/comment-mainmenu-36/997-sponsored-content-the-future-of-visualisation" target="_blank">built physically</a>.</p> <p>Part of that future for Autodesk now includes brand new software called Stingray. &nbsp;An application CGarchitect was able to get a hands on <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/stingray/overview" target="_blank">preview</a> of Stingray being used with <a href="https://www.htcvive.com/us/" target="_blank">HTC Vive</a>&nbsp;in what we think is one of the best and most immersive VR experiences we&rsquo;ve tried yet - and we&rsquo;ve tried almost all of them. &nbsp;

<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentInterior-Veranda_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentInterior-Veranda_sm.jpg" width="630" height="356" /></a><br /><br />Stingray is Autodesk&rsquo;s foray into 3D gaming engines and real-time rendering software, made possible through the 2014 <a href="http://news.autodesk.com/press-release/corporate-sustainability/autodesk-acquires-bitsquid" target="_blank">acquisition</a> of Stockholm-based Bitsquid AB. &nbsp;Stingray is integrated with 3ds Max, Maya, and Maya LT software and allows both novice and advanced artists to create visually stunning real-time experiences.

 On the AU exhibition floor, the constantly packed LIVE Design booth, featured two experiential pods that could only be described as the next best thing to a Star Trek holodeck. &nbsp; <br /><br />Within the 10 x 10 space, ceiling mounted sensors track the HTC Vive headset and the Vive controller, allowing users to not only experience the architectural space, by moving their head around, but also by walking around the space and pointing to interact with the environment. &nbsp;

<br /><br /><strong><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156468949" width="630" height="473" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> 

</strong><br /><br />The AU experience enabled users to explore a penthouse apartment, large balcony, and pool area using Stingray&rsquo;s real-time engine to render the scene in stereo to the headset. &nbsp; Obviously within the confines of a 10x10 space, one runs out of walking room rather quickly, but a clever real-time implementation fades in a transparent wireframe wall into your view before you physically walk into the booth wall. You can then use the Vive controller to point to a new location within the space which teleports you there. The experience also showcases the power of VR as being more than just seeing the space, but being able to experience and make decisions in that space. &nbsp;Things like changing furniture configurations, opening doors, finishes etc. &nbsp; The one drawback of writing about VR is that you can never fully describe what it&rsquo;s like to feel scale, which I think is what makes this particular implementation so powerful. &nbsp;<br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-ApartmentInterior-Dining_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-ApartmentInterior-Dining_sm.jpg" width="630" height="356" /></a><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-ApartmentInterior-LivingRoom_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-ApartmentInterior-LivingRoom_sm.jpg" width="630" height="356" /></a><br /><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentExterior-PoolScene1_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentExterior-PoolScene1_sm.jpg" width="630" /></a><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentInterior-WallPeelBackTechView_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentInterior-WallPeelBackTechView_sm.jpg" width="630" height="354" /></a><br /><br /><a href="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentInterior-WallPeelBackFinished_med.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/posts/features/2016_02/AU2015/AutodeskStingray-SFApartmentInterior-WallPeelBackFinished_sm.jpg" width="630" height="355" /></a><br /><br />From the videos included in this article, one could arguably critique the visual fidelity, however I was surprised at how little that played once you are actually immersed in the space. &nbsp;You really do need to experience Autodesk Stingray in VR to really appreciate the power of this new tool.

<br /><br /><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156462517" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <br /><br /><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156468504" width="630" height="473" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p>The experiential component obviously plays a large part of the power of this tool, however you don&rsquo;t get there without the upfront work of getting the model into Stringray, building the interactions and of course the finishes and lighting. &nbsp;That is really where Stingray shines. Most of the game engine tools&nbsp;we have come to know within the architectural space were born out of the gaming industry. &nbsp;As a result the workflows and paradigms are very foreign to what we have become accustomed to. &nbsp;Autodesk&rsquo;s goal with Stringray is to drastically improve upon this and build integrated workflows with the tools we use most, like 3ds Max and Revit.

<br /><br /><br /><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156462512" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <br /><br />
<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156462514" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p>Syncing with the subscription based structure that Autodesk has now fully moved to, <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/stingray/overview" target="_blank">Stringray</a> can be accessed for only $240 USD/yr or $30 USD/mo.</p> <p>Everything I&rsquo;ve seen, experienced and read suggests 2016 could very well be the year of VR and Real-Time so I&rsquo;m really excited to see what artists and designers accomplish with <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/stingray/overview" target="_blank">Stingray</a> over the next year.

<br /><br /><br /><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156462513" width="630" height="354" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p></p> <p>Click <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/stingray/free-trial" target="_blank">here</a> to try a 30 day free trial of <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/stingray/overview" target="_blank">Stringray</a>&nbsp; And <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/3ds-max/overview-dts" target="_blank">here</a> to subscribe to <a href="http://www.autodesk.com/products/3ds-max/overview-dts" target="_blank">3ds Max</a> for as little as $123 USD/mo<br /><br />&nbsp;</p>Wed, 24 Feb 2016 22:08:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/02/122706.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/2016-the-year-of-vr-stingray-and-live-designProject Soane Rendering Competition - Launched!Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/project-soane-rendering-competition---launched"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/02/122645.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><img src="/content/posts/2016_02/CGA-Newsletter-Header-v1a.jpg" width="600" height="350" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p></p> <p>Nearly a century ago Sir John Soane&rsquo;s treasured Bank of England was destroyed &ndash; described by some as the greatest architectural crime of the 20th century. It was his life&rsquo;s work. Soane&rsquo;s spectacular use of natural light and mesmerizing effects of scale not only revolutionized the architecture world but his work also culminated in him being knighted by King William IV.</p> <p>We invite you to join the mission to recreate this lost masterpiece and reinvent the way the world can experience history. Participants in this historic rendering competition will have the <strong>chance to win almost $30,000 of great prizes,</strong> including a fully-loaded HP Z840 Workstation with NVIDIA Quadro M6000 professional graphics.<br /><br />Now these models are available to you, to transform into detailed still, animated, and real-time renderings, and enable the world to better understand and experience the works of Sir John Soane.&nbsp;<br /><br /></p> <center> <h1><strong><a href="http://projectsoane.com/" target="_blank">Register and Download the Models Now</a></strong></h1> </center>Wed, 17 Feb 2016 11:31:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/02/122645.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/project-soane-rendering-competition---launchedInspiration - Wood Vol. 3Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/inspiration---wood-vol-3"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2013/11/89401.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } if (browName!='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); document.write('</'+'scr'+'ipt>'); } // --> </script> <noscript>    <a href="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Click&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" target="_blank">    <img src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=62&amp;Task=Get&amp;Mode=HTML&amp;SiteID=1&amp;PageID=43049" width="300" height="125" border="0"  alt=""></a> </noscript> <!-- End -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --><p><a href="/2013/11/chapel-of-votum-aleksa-in-poland"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2013/11/88861/kaplica_resize_medium.jpg" height="1008" width="630" /><br /></a><a href="/members/view/gregorybuca">Gregory Buca</a><a href="/2013/11/chapel-of-votum-aleksa-in-poland"></a></p> <p><a href="/2013/06/temporary-bar"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2013/06/80720/2013-06-19_002702-1_medium.jpg" height="630" width="630" /><br /></a><a href="/members/view/lotoinfographistes">LOTO infographistes</a></p> <p><a href="/2013/10/modern-sitting-room"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2013/10/86642/hal_design4_medium.jpg" height="458" width="630" /><br /></a><a href="/members/view/saeedjoshan1">saeed joshan</a><a href="/2013/10/modern-sitting-room"><br /></a></p> <p><a href="/2014/01/svartlamoen2"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2014/01/92420/Svartlamoen2_medium.jpg" height="717" width="630" /><br /></a><a href="/members/view/mohamedsabry">Mohamed Sabry</a></p> <p><a href="/members/view/mohamedsabry"></a><a href="/2015/09/guna-house"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2015/09/116823/niuanse-pezo-von-ellrichshausen_medium.jpg" width="630" height="630" /></a><a href="/members/view/niuansestudio" style="border: 0px; 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border-image-outset: initial; border-image-repeat: initial;"><b>&nbsp;<br /><br /><a href="/2016/02/when-the-music-stops"><img src="/content/portfolioitems/2016/02/122189/Loft_Final_Artur_Saljukov1_medium.jpg" width="630" height="945" /><br /></a></b></span></span></p> <p><span color="#646464" face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" style="color: #646464; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;"><b>Artur Saljukov - </b></span></span><span color="#646464" face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" style="color: #646464; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;"><b>Artur Saljukov Visuals</b></span></span><b style="color: #646464; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;">&nbsp;</b></p>Fri, 12 Feb 2016 11:21:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2013/11/89401.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/inspiration---wood-vol-32015 Architectural VisualizationIndustry Survey - Infographic Volume 5Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/02/2015-architectural-visualizationindustry-survey---infographic-volume-5"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/02/122480.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; 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New features in <strong>3ds Max</strong> animation and modeling software help you to:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Extend 3ds Max with new geometric objects and modifiers</strong> by creating graphs in a visual environment similar to the Slate material editor. Max Creation Graph, a new node-based tool creation environment, lets you create new node types by saving graphs called compounds, or choose from several hundred different node types (operators) that can be connected together to create new tools and visual effects. New tools can be packaged and shared with other users.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Collaborate easier across teams and throughout the production pipeline</strong> with new support for non-destructive animation workflows in XRef and improved stability. Externally reference objects to your scene and animate them or edit material on the XRef object in the source file, without having to merge the objects into the scene. Changes made in the source file will be inherited in your local scene. Publish and organize animatable parameters on your desired node, making it easier for other users to externally reference content to populate their scenes.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Represent subdivision surfaces in 3ds Max using the OpenSubdiv libraries open-sourced by Pixar.</strong> Experience faster in-viewport performance for meshes with high subdivision levels with libraries that incorporate technology from Microsoft Research, and are designed to help take advantage of both parallel CPU and GPU architectures.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Create complex topology with more consistent appearances</strong> in less time using the crease modeling workflows in CreaseSet modifier and Crease Explorer. Using FBX asset exchange technology, they allow for easier transfer of models to and from certain other packages that support OpenSubdiv.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Experience improved speed and quality</strong> while you edit or pose models with OpenSubdiv features that include support for adaptive subdivision in the viewports and at render time.&nbsp;<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Access object placement, lighting, rendering, modeling and texturing tools&nbsp;</strong>more easily with new Design Workspace features that follow a task-based logical system to improve workflow. Create high-quality stills and animation more easily with new, faster design data importing capabilities.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Accelerate the scene creation process with new on-demand templates</strong> that provide standardized start-up configurations. Easily import, export, and share templates across teams, and create or modify existing ones to tailor them to your workflow.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Experience greater creative flexibility and control with the new Camera Sequencer</strong>, which allows you tocut between multiple cameras, trim, and reorder animated clips nondestructively&mdash;leaving the original animation data unchanged.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Reduce undesirable deformation artifacts more easily using Dual Quaternion Skinning.</strong> This new method of smooth skinning is built specifically to avoid &ldquo;bow tie&rdquo; or &ldquo;candy wrapper&rdquo; effects, most common in a character&rsquo;s shoulders or wrists, where the mesh loses volume when deformers are twisted or pivoted.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Create more precise textures with using the new Dual Quaternion skin modifier</strong>, which lets you paint the amount of influence skinning will have on a surface, so you can use it where you need it and taper off to linear skin weighting where you don&rsquo;t.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Help reduce rendering time and costs by rendering projects online in the cloud.</strong> Autodesk A360 Rendering Support helps you create impressive high-resolution images without having to tie up the desktop or requiring specialized rendering hardware. Available to customers on Maintenance and Desktop Subscription, A360 also helps you create and share solar study renderings, interactive panoramas, illuminance simulations, and re-render images from previously uploaded files.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Simulate real-life camera settings, such as Shutter Speed, Aperture, Depth of Field, and Exposure</strong> using the new Physical Camera co-developed with Chaos Group, the makers of V-Ray. Creating more photorealistic images and animations more easily with enhanced controls and additional in-viewport feedback.<br /><br /><br /><a href="http://cgar.ch/1nSP87v" target="_blank">CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION&nbsp;</a></li> </ul>Sun, 31 Jan 2016 23:05:00 MSThttp://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2016/01/122062.jpghttp://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/01/autodesk-3ds-max---subscriptionInspiration - Composition Vol. 1Jeff Mottle<p><a href="http://www.cgarchitect.com/2016/01/inspiration---composition-vol-1"><img src="http://www.cgarchitect.com/content/thumbnails/2014/01/92386.jpg" /></a></p><!-- Begin -  Site: CGarchitect.com Zone: Small Rectangle (RSS) --> <script language="javascript"  type="text/javascript"> <!-- var browName = navigator.appName; var SiteID = 1; var ZoneID = 62; var browDateTime = (new Date()).getTime(); if (browName=='Netscape') { document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://icescrew.cgarchitect.com/a.aspx?ZoneID=' + ZoneID + '&amp;Task=Get&amp;IFR=False&amp;Browser=NETSCAPE4&amp;PageID=43049&amp;SiteID=' + SiteID + '&amp;Random=' + browDateTime  + '">'); 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